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An Architectural Synaesthetic Experience for Children

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Students are required to design an installation that illustrates synaesthetic experience that involves all sensual experiences in space. The installation can be used as part of a future children museum.

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An Architectural Synaesthetic Experience for Children

  1. 1. Qatar UniversityCollege of EngineeringDepartment of Architecture and Urban PlanningARCT211Architectural Design Studio I - 2011-2012Instructor: Dr. Yasser Mahgoub
  2. 2.  Knowledge: To know how to design a space installation that elicits all sensual experiences. Ability: To express and discuss architectural design ideas and concepts. Skill: To design, draw and make models for an architectural idea. Theme: The design should provide an exciting spatial experience for children.
  3. 3.  Students are required to design an installation that illustrates synaesthetic experience that involves all sensual experiences in space. The installation can be used as part of a future children museum. The installation should cover an area between 30m2 and 50m2 with a maximum height of 3 m and a minimum height of 50 cm.
  4. 4.  Team of 3 students are required to develop a model of the installation scale 1:10 using cardboard. Students are also required to present one 100x70 cm drawing board containing concept statement, pictures of model illustrating different experiences, plan and 2 sections scale 1:20 using architectural rendering techniques.
  5. 5.  The due date for the assignment submission is November 1st, 2011.
  6. 6. "Synesthesia is a love story between the senses" —Dr. Hugo Heyrman
  7. 7. RedGreenYellow
  8. 8. 12345
  9. 9. A B C D E
  10. 10.  if yuo can raed tihs, You Msut Be Raelly Smrat. Olny 55 plepoe out of 100 can! it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, olny taht the frist and lsat ltteres are at the rghit pcleas. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm.
  11. 11.  "Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosnt mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteers be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe."Chances are you also understand it. It purports that the order of the letters inside a givenword doesnt matter, as long as the first and last letters of each word are in the rightplace. You can read the words because the human mind reads words as a whole, and notletter-by-letter.
  12. 12.  Arabish is a combination of an Arabic pronunciation, and Latin written characters. Its been widely used lately. In terms of users, many from the Middle Eastern users on the internet can understand and communicate through Arabish.
  13. 13.  How someone with grapheme → color synesthesia might perceive (not "see") certain letters and numbers.
  14. 14.  How someone with grapheme → color synesthesia might perceive (not "see") certain letters and numbers.
  15. 15.  How someone with grapheme → color synesthesia might perceive (not "see") certain letters and numbers.
  16. 16.  How someone with grapheme → color synesthesia might perceive (not "see") certain letters and numbers.
  17. 17.  How someone with grapheme → color synesthesia might perceive (not "see") certain letters and numbers.
  18. 18. Marilyn Monroe Visual Illusion
  19. 19.  Synesthetes are in some sense, people of the future. "Synesthesia is seven times more common among artists, novelists and poets, and creative people in general," says neuroscientist Dr. Ramachandran, "artists often have the ability to link unconnected domains, have the power of metaphor and the capability of blending realities," he says.
  20. 20.  Synesthetic art: a cross-sensory perception evocated by the experience of an artwork Synesthetic images: images that accumulate striking metaphorical resonance Literary synesthesia: a poetic expression or metaphorical articulation of a sensorial correspondence Synesthetic metaphor: a metaphor that exploits a similarity between experiences in different sense modalities Poetic synesthesia: a semantic metaphoric fusion, to create a virtual image
  21. 21.  Kinetic synesthesia: experiencing dance in multimedia scenographiesSynesthetic canvas: an electronic screen Conceptual synesthesia: elicited from time, graph, grapheme, written word, personality, or thought/memory Synesthetic cinema: translating consciousness and perception into sound and moving imagesTele-synesthesia: a synesthetic experience evoked by a telematic use of new media; the travelling senses
  22. 22.  Art is sensuous knowledge Art and synesthesia are both the result of the united senses of the mind The arts offer multisensory forms of knowing and communicating A synesthetical approach to reality is one of the primal sources of art In art one dimension is often evocated by another Art makes new connections between the senses Synesthesia appears in all forms of art
  23. 23.  Works of art are literally pregnant with meaning. The highest form of symbiosis (relationship) between synesthesia and metaphor happens in art, because synergy (functioning together) is the essence of the living present and the essence of art. Basically, science examines and explains how and art provides a vision of why. Art points a direction, and science provides the transportation to get you there.
  24. 24. What do you notice in the picture to the left?
  25. 25. Kiki Bouba 95% to 98% of people choose kiki for the angular shape and bouba for the rounded one  Ramachandran and Hubbard suggest the kiki/bouba effect has implications for the evolution of language, because the naming of objects is not completely arbitrary. The rounded shape may intuitively be named bouba because the mouth makes a more rounded shape to produce that sound, while a more taut, angular mouth shape is needed to articulate kiki. The sound of K is also harder and more forceful than that of B. Experiment first designed by Wolfgang Köhler
  26. 26.  “Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible.” —Paul Klee

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