Words and Jargons in use


    I. Useful words
           To indicate more information

           •     Besides - Making ...
•     Whereby - As a result of which, By which, "the means whereby we
    achieved our goal"

          To indicate a resu...
•       delineate
          •       represent
          •       demonstrate
          •       constitute - Form or compose...
•       Before
          •       Currently
          •       During
          •       Eventually
          •       Finally...
•      More likely
          •      Possibly
          •      Probably
          •      Dubitable - Open to doubt or suspi...
•        superb
          •        good
          •        fine
          •        great
          •        avid - Emotion...
•       acumen - Shrewdness shown by keen insight
          •       insightful
          •       savvy - The cognitive con...
•      vocalized - Express or state clearly
          •      posited - Put firmly
          •      stated
          •     ...
•      various
                  •      several
                  •      diverse
                  •      umpteen
        ...
at the end of the day

            Based on the frequency with which they use the phrase, it would seem that
            m...
buy-in (n.)

            A cute way of saying "agreement" or "consent." If you hope to get anything done in
            to...
A sequence of events where a slip in any one activity generates a slip in the overall
             schedule. Used extensiv...
disincent

            The third member of the incent-incentivize-disincent axis of evil.

     drill-down (v.)

         ...
Seemingly naughty, this one means "complete, from the front-end (the end that
            faces the customer) to the back-...
helicopter view (n.)

             See "at 30,000 feet".

     high-level (adj.)

             Senior executives, far-sigh...
To get everyone on the same page, singing from the same choir sheet, etc. Why
            neither of these tired, but well...
The noble mission of Web slingers everywhere: figuring out how to make money off
            each page view, visitor (eyeb...
performance management (n.)

            A euphemistic way of saying to micro-manage, berate, motivate, psychologically
  ...
reach out (v.)

             To call or email. For this one, we can blame those old AT&T ads that encouraged
             ...
To set the scope of a product, i.e. to determine what "functionality" will be included.
            After products are "sc...
"raise," as in "raise concerns." For instance: "I think we need to surface those issues
             before the product is...
Wouldn't it be great if you could buy a complex system or piece of software, plug it
            in, flip a switch and be ...
III- Exhaustive list of Management Jargons


           Above-board [adj.]        Honest and open. "I don't think
        ...
your concerns in the upcoming
                              weeks."
                              Submitted by Russel H.

...
meeting this afternoon. It's never a
                             good sign when he's willing to freeze
                  ...
Arrows to fire [exp.]     Points to use in an argument. "Now if
                               you don't have anymore arro...
Bait and switch [v.]     To advertise low priced items that
                              aren't actually available.

    ...
success rate.

     Batting average [n.]   Indicates the percentage of time that
                            someone or so...
go out."
                            Submitted by Crazy Renee.

     Best in breed [adj.]   Alleged or perceived superior
...
Bleed [v.]               Extract a large sum of money from
                              an organization or individual.

 ...
Boiler room [n.]           A sales firm with questionable
                                practices.

     Boiling the fro...
Bouncebackability [n.]    The ability to reverse a losing
                               situation and then succeed.
     ...
that a website is necessary to stay
                                 competitive.

     Bring to the table [exp.]   The co...
Bullish [adj.]          To be in favour of. "I'm feeling
                             bullish about this new product."

  ...
to word-of-mouth advertising.

     Buzzworthy [adj.]   A novel idea or product that has the
                         pote...
Cabinet condom [n.]         Tape applied to the button of a filing
                                 cabinet to prevent it ...
(CLM) [n.]                hinder the future progression of
                               one's career.


     Career suic...
catalyst for improvement. Often
                           involves encouraging the adoption of
                          ...
Chicken shop [n.]       A department or company that
                             produces substandard work. "Their
      ...
parts of the world where cricket
                           lingo and business jargon are equally
                        ...
Comp [adj.]              The cool way to say complimentary.


     Contrarian [n.]          An investor who makes decision...
and activities. Often leveraged.


     Cost containment [n.]   An attempt to reduce expenditures.


     Counterposing [v...
Submitted by Jocelyn S.


     Critical mass [n.]       1) The point reached by a new idea
                              o...
vacation, maternity leave, or the
                              latest round of layoffs.
                              Sub...
Submitted by minorfall.

     Data-point [n.]     An area of factual inquiry.
                         Submitted by Joe O....
Decruit [v.]             A clever euphemism for firing senior
                              employees. "The board is pushi...
desk to unplug equipment or fetch a
                               dropped item. Often accompanied by
                    ...
surpassed by his resistance to
                            change.
                            Submitted by Aaron D.

    ...
company.

     Dog and pony show [n.]   A presentation that's insultingly
                              simplistic.

     ...
Dovetail [v.]             To expand upon a fellow employee's
                               idea. Claiming it as your own ...
dub-dub dot..."
                             Submitted by Chandra C.

     Duck shove [AUS-n.]     The act of passing an u...
has been well procrastinated. "Just
                            eat the frog and get on with it!"
                        ...
enthuse the new hires."
                             Submitted indirectly by Andy P.

     EPON [n.]               Endless...
F2F [exp.]           A really cute way of saying face-to-
                          face.

     Face time [n.]       1) Th...
Featherbedding [v.]       Keeping jobs that aren't needed in
                               order to please the union.

  ...
something -- anything -- wrong.
                                Submitted by Vic P.

     Fit for purpose [adj.]     Any g...
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
Useful english words and jargons
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Useful english words and jargons

  1. 1. Words and Jargons in use I. Useful words To indicate more information • Besides - Making an additional point; anyway • Furthermore • In addition • Moreover • Likewise • Indeed – In truth • In fact • Also • As well • Foremost - Ranking above all others; Preceding all others in spatial position • First, Second, Third, Finally • Firstly, Secondly, Thirdly To indicate an example • For example • For instance • In particular • Particularly - Specifically or especially distinguished from others • Specifically • To illustrate • To demonstrate To indicate a cause or reason • Since • Because • Because of • Due to • For • For the reason that • As • Inasmuch as - Since 1
  2. 2. • Whereby - As a result of which, By which, "the means whereby we achieved our goal" To indicate a result or an effect • Accordingly - because of the reason given • Consequently • Hence • So • Therefore • Thus • Thusly - In the way indicated • Thence - From that fact or reason or as a result • Therefrom - From that circumstance or source • Thereof - Of or concerning this or that, From that circumstance or source • Corollary - A practical consequence that follows naturally, "blind jealousy is a frequent corollary of passionate love" To conclude • For the aforementioned reasons • For the aforementioned reasons, there is no doubt that • To sum up the foregoing, • Given these facts • In conclusion • In closing • To conclude To express an opinion • In all due fairness • With good judgment, (one/we may) To describe or make • vivid • portray • depict • exhibit • illustrate • expose • present • paint a portrait • limn - Trace the shape of, make a portrait of 2
  3. 3. • delineate • represent • demonstrate • constitute - Form or compose • embodied - (adj) Expressed by • embody - (v) Represent or express in tangible form • embodiment To prove • manifest - Provide evidence for; stand as proof of • attest - Provide evidence for • testify - Provide evidence for • certify - Provide evidence for • endorse, indorse - Give support or one's approval to • shew - Establish the validity of something, as by an example, explanation or experiment • establish • instance - (v) Clarify by giving an example of • exemplify - (v) Clarify by giving an example of To compare or contrast • Whereas • In comparison • In contrast • However • Although • On the other hand • Likewise • Similarly • But • Yet • Withal - Despite anything to the contrary (usually following a concession) • Withal - Together with this • Nevertheless - Despite anything to the contrary • Nonetheless - Despite anything to the contrary • Notwithstanding - Despite anything to the contrary • Even so - Despite anything to the contrary • All the same - Despite anything to the contrary To indicate time • After 3
  4. 4. • Before • Currently • During • Eventually • Finally • First, Second, etc. • Formerly • Immediately • Initially • Lastly • Later • Meanwhile • Next • Once • Previously • Simultaneously • Soon • Subsequently • Subsequent - Following in time and order • Hitherto, Heretofore - Used in negative statement to describe a situation that has existed up to this point or up to the present time, “The sun hasn’t rose hitherto.” • In due time • Henceforth To indicate certainty • Truly • Sincerely • Genuinely • Surely • Rightfully • Absolutely • Indubitably • Certainly • Without doubt • Needless to say To indicate doubt • Most likely 4
  5. 5. • More likely • Possibly • Probably • Dubitable - Open to doubt or suspicion • Dubious - Distressed with uncertainty or doubt To summarize • Overall • To summarize • In summary • To sum up • Paraphrased • Briefly • In brief • Summing up • To put it briefly • précis - A sketchy summary, Make a summary (of) • synopsis - A sketchy summary • apercu - A short synopsis To provide a condition • provision, proviso - A stipulated condition • stipulate - Specify as a condition or requirement in a contract • given • if • whether • whenever • when • while To express positive words • magnificent • grandeur - The quality of being magnificent or splendid or grand, the quality of being exalted in character or ideals or conduct • magnanimous - The quality of being exalted in character or ideals or conduct • fantastic • fantastical • phenomenal • wonderful • extraordinary • marvelous 5
  6. 6. • superb • good • fine • great • avid - Emotionally desirable • avid ambition to succeed • excellent • spectacular • prodigious • grand • brilliant • glorious - Bringing great happiness and thankfulness • illustrious - Widely known and esteemed • notable - Worthy of notice • respected • impressive • splendid • splendiferous - Having great beauty and splendor • resplendent - Having great beauty and splendor, Richly and brilliantly colorful • flamboyant - Elaborately or excessively ornamented, Richly and brilliantly colorful • redoubtable - Having or worthy of pride • formidable - Extremely impressive in strength or excellence • prowess • superior • terrific • tremendous • wondrous - Extraordinarily good • wonderful • sublime - Inspiring awe, Lifted up or set high • flair - natural talent • knack - A special way of doing something • outshine - Attract more attention and praise than others • paramount - Having superior power and influence • predominant • preponderating • prevailing To show intelligence • profound • shrewd – hardheaded (practical experience and observation) intelligence • astute 6
  7. 7. • acumen - Shrewdness shown by keen insight • insightful • savvy - The cognitive condition of someone who understands • cognition - The psychological result of perception, learning and reasoning • genius • smart • sharp • keen • mastermind • Einstein - Someone who has exceptional intellectual ability and originality • work of art • fine art • maven - Someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field • mavin - Someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field • adept - Someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field • whiz - Someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field • wizard - Someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field To intensify • incredibly • exceedingly • toppingly - extremely well • extremely • extraordinarily • truly • really • very • utterly - Completely and without qualification; used informally as intensifiers, With sublimity; in a sublime manner • absolutely • perfectly • sublimely • dramatically • sheer - (adj.) Complete and without restriction or qualification; sometimes used informally as an intensifier; (adv.) Directly "he fell sheer into the water" Said • enounced, enunciated - Speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way • pronounced - Speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way • articulated - Express or state clearly 7
  8. 8. • vocalized - Express or state clearly • posited - Put firmly • stated • expressed • reported • alleged - Declared but not proved • averred - Report or maintain, To declare or affirm in a grave manner and formally as true • affirmed, asserted • wrote • composed • indited - Produce a literary work • penned - Produce a literary work • spelt - Indicate or signify • voiced, sounded - Give voice to • demean - Reduce in worth or character, usually verbally Noted (said) • remarked • denoted - Be a sign or indication of, "Her smile denoted that she agreed" • observed • commented • mentioned • referred • announced • noticed Precisely • explicitly • accurately • expressly • exactly • incisively Numerous • innumerable • many 8
  9. 9. • various • several • diverse • umpteen • umteen • myriad (noun and adj.) Praise • extol - (v) Praise, glorify, or honor • exalt • glorify • laud • proclaim • revere • idolize • worship • venerate Call Forth • evoke - Call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses) • arouse - Call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses) • elicit - Call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses) • enkindle - Call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses) • provoke - Call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses) • inflame - Arouse or excite feelings and passions • awake - Stop sleeping • conjure - Evoke or call forth, with or as if by magic • invoke - Evoke or call forth, with or as if by magic • summon - Gather or bring together • instill - deposit gradually Source-http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~mfp27/improveyourwritingability/ II. Management Jargons actionable (adj.) Capable of being acted on or completed in the near future. "Which items on our list are actionable in the next quarter?" I recommend showering after using this one. Note: "actionable" has a long-standing legal meaning different from the above. 9
  10. 10. at the end of the day Based on the frequency with which they use the phrase, it would seem that members of senior management are required by law to begin every third sentence with "at the end of the day," a phrase similar in meaning to "when all is said and done." For instance, your favorite CEO might say, "At the end of the day, it's our people that make the difference." Insert platitude here. bandwidth (n.) Plan your work well lest ye run out of "bandwidth," or physical, mental or emotional capacity. Spake our friend Frank B. Kern, Internet Guru, "....I just don't have the bandwidth to handle this at the minute," meaning "I don't have the manpower or ability to handle this at the minute." best of breed (n. and adj.) The finest specimen or example to be found in a particular industry or market. Like Papillons preening for the judges, companies position themselves as best-of-breed. In truth, however, few ever make it through the qualifiers. best practices (n.) Another widely used term promulgated by the arch-demons of business - management consultants - "best practices" is used to describe the "best" techniques or methods in use in a company, field, or industry. Unfortunately, companies often confuse latest or trendiest with best, and the best practices of one era are soon superseded by the ever-more-ludicrous fads of the next. boil the ocean (v. phrase) Clearly the least efficient way to produce a pile of salt. If a member of the corporate pantheon suggests you are trying to "boil the ocean," he or she thinks you are doing something incredibly inefficiently. It's time to prepare your resume, Einstein. bring to the table (v. phrase) Refers to what one offers or provides, especially in negotiations. Personally, I bring a fork. business model (n.) An amorphous term having to do with identifying the specific ways in which a business creates value, or simply put, how it sells stuff for more than it costs. I'll show you my business plan if you show me yours. 10
  11. 11. buy-in (n.) A cute way of saying "agreement" or "consent." If you hope to get anything done in today's corporation, you'll need management buy-in. centers of excellence Certainly beats centers of failure. Most companies have a nice set of both. circle back around (v.) A very roundabout (pardon the pun) way of saying "Let's regroup later to discuss." circle with (v.) Like its cousin "circle back around," it means "to meet and/or discuss with." Usage example: "Why don't you circle with Robert tomorrow to discuss the Ebbers case?" I can't help but envision two well-dressed exec types holding hands and madly circling around to the delight of everyone in their cubicle farm. c-level (adj.) Those modest, hardworking souls at the top of your org chart: CEO, COO, CFO, CIO, CPO, CTO, Chief Dog Walker, etc. close the loop (v. phrase) To follow up on and/or close out an area of discussion. Closely related to "circle back around" and "loop in." commoditize (v.); commoditized (adj.) A great fear and apprehension in business is having your product or service become "commoditized," or turned into Just Another Mediocre Piece of Junk (JAMPoJ to those in the know), completely undifferentiated from its peers. componentize (v.) Nigh unpronounceable, this gremlin means "to turn into a component." For what purpose will forever remain a mystery. core competencies (n.) Simply put, it means "what the company does best." When a company focuses on its core competencies, it gets back to basics. I recommend leveraging these. critical path (n.) 11
  12. 12. A sequence of events where a slip in any one activity generates a slip in the overall schedule. Used extensively in the exciting world of project management. Not to be confused with "criminal path," which is a sequence of events that leads to jail, a la Andy Fastow of Enron fame. cycles (n.) A reference to computer processing cycles, this one can be used interchangeably with bandwidth. Either way, it's a bad idea comparing yourself or another humanoid to an indefatigable machine. You'll lose. deliverables (n.) Denoting project output or assignments, "deliverables" are often "tasked" (see below), but seldom completed. descope (v.) Please see "scope" on page 2. dial-in (v.) Despite the obvious reference to a telephone, this one means to "include." For example, "We need to dial-in the materials list." dialogue (v.) It's true that Shakespeare used "dialogue" as a verb ("Dost Dialogue with thy shadow?"). But I've got news for ya, buddy: You ain't no Shakespeare. Resist the temptation to use this utterly superfluous verb as a substitute for "talk" or "speak." Usage example: “Let’s dialogue telephonically via land line," meaning "call me at the office." Sigh. disintermediate In the bleak days before the arrival of our savior, the Web, Big Tony used to claim that he had "eliminated the middleman to bring direct savings to you." Big Tony used a shotgun to eliminate ("disintermediate") intermediaries in the supply chain; today's companies use the Internet. disambiguate (v.) This mouthful began life in the exciting field of linguistics only to be co-opted by the high-tech business set. It means to settle on a single interpretation or meaning for a piece of data, or to bring meaning and order to ambiguity. Much like this Web site. 12
  13. 13. disincent The third member of the incent-incentivize-disincent axis of evil. drill-down (v.) To get down to the details. One starts at a "high-level" and "drills down" to the boring details - where exectutives fear to tread. drinking the kool-aid (v. phrase) A rather tasteless reference to the Jonestown massacre of 1978, "drink the kool-aid" means to accept something fully and (oftentimes) blindly. driver (n.) If you think this one has something to do with the people who drive trucks, you're wrong (but I still like you). It refers to the factors or agents that move something forward: "What are the key drivers of organizational change?" eat(ing) your own dog food (v. phrase) NEW! When your company starts using its own products internally and suddenly realizes why the rest of the world hates them so much. ecosystem (n.) NEW! Companies now longer participate in industries; they inhabit vast ecosystems comprised of consumers, partners, innocent bystanders, and, increasingly, competitors. The idea is to be at the center of your ecosystem, so integral to its operations that the actions of all other participants seem to benefit you as much as them (also see Network Effects). But remember to look out for lions. elevator story (n.) A pitch to a corporate executive, or bored janitor, as the elevator goes from floors 1- 10 and you have a captive audience. Also the name of an upcoming Tom Hanks movie. enabler (n.) Like your dysfunctional family, business is full of enablers - things that enable something else, often of a self-destructive nature. For instance, were you aware that "Total Facilities Management is a Core Business Enabler"? Weird, I wasn't either. end-to-end (adj.) 13
  14. 14. Seemingly naughty, this one means "complete, from the front-end (the end that faces the customer) to the back-end (your back office, which no one sees)." Try to avoid this one in mixed company. facetime (n.) A foreign concept to many of us in the Internet world, "facetime"refers to time spent speaking face to face, especially to senior management. For example, “I need to arrange some facetime with you next week.” feature/scope creep (n.) AWESOME! The temptation to add more and more features to a product release until it becomes a confused mass of incongruous elements, twisted and evil. functionality (n.) Simply meaning "functions" or "features," this one has gained widespread currency. gain traction (v.) To gain momentum or acceptance. "Cisco's new routers are gaining traction in the marketplace." going forward (adv.) Meaning "in the future" or "from now on." For instance: "Going forward, we see our gross margins increasing as our new high-margin products gain traction." granular (adj.); granularity (n.) Getting down to the fine details, the nitty-gritty. Busy people might stop you mid- sentence if you get too granular. Like sand through an hourglass, these are the days of our lives. go-live (adj. and v.) A new product or system becomes available to the public on its "go-live" date. Presumably, the same product or system will "go-dead" soon thereafter. heads-up (n. sorta) "This is a heads-up" is a very American way of saying, "I'm telling you this now because xyz item is hurdling in your direction and you're going to need to do something or get out of the way." It's simultaneously a notice and a warning. 14
  15. 15. helicopter view (n.) See "at 30,000 feet". high-level (adj.) Senior executives, far-sighted individual with godlike abilities to see the big picture, want anything brought to their attention to be "high-level", that is, neatly summarized and dumbed down so they can understand all the techno mumbo jumbo. incent (v. tr.) A transitive verb meaning "encourage" or "influence": "The program was set up to incent users to spend more." Also the leading member of the incent-incentivize- disincent axis of evil. incentivize (v. tr) The second member of the incent-incentivize-disincent axis of evil. instantiate (v.) The unholy offspring of "instant" and "substantiate," "instantiate" means to verify or document an instance of a particular behavior or issue. leapfrog (v.) To surpass your competition, usually by engaging in one gigantic, hopelessly ambitious leap of faith that is almost sure to end in ruin and despair. Bring a parachute, golden or other. learnings (n.) Word favored by consultant-types meaning "something learned." Apparently, "lesson" wouldn't do despite 500 years of continuous use in the English language. leverage (v. tr) The grandpappy of nouns turned verbs, "leverage" is used indiscriminately to describe how a resource can be applied to a particular environment or situation. "We intend to leverage our investment in IT infrastructure across our business units to drive profits." level set (v.) 15
  16. 16. To get everyone on the same page, singing from the same choir sheet, etc. Why neither of these tired, but well-understood perennials is good enough is beyond me. I guess "level set" just has that I-am-slightly-smarter-than-you-all ring to it. long-pole item (n.) Those of you who enjoy the occasional camping trip may recognize the provenance of this one: The long pole holds up the center of the tent and is therefore the most essential structural item. Likewise, a "long-pole item" is the most essential element of a system or plan, upon which all other elements depend. A linchpin, as it were. loop in (v.); keep in the loop (v. phrase) Used by loopy people who mean to say, "to keep apprised." low-hanging fruit (n.) The easy pickings, the obvious steps that an organization should take to improve its performance or take advantage of new opportunities. mindshare (n.) Sorta like "marketshare," but without the revenue and sounding a whole lot creepier. Don't use this one around Vulcans. mission-critical (adj.) Meaning "critical to the functioning or success of a business or project," this one is generally used in reference in insanely expensive computer hardware that should be bulletproof, but, alas, is not. modularize (v.) To turn into a training module. Say, you start off with a simple piece of information that anyone with a 6th grade education and a quartet of functioning brain cells would instantly grasp. To justify your position as a highly paid corporate trainer, you might try to veil this information in a cloak of incomprehensibility, rendering the straightforward a smelly pile of jargonous bile. Indeed, the information has been modularized. monetize (v.) 16
  17. 17. The noble mission of Web slingers everywhere: figuring out how to make money off each page view, visitor (eyeballs), or anything else. If you work at an Internet company, you've used this term... don't lie. Hell, even I've used this term. next steps (n.) "Next steps" are the tasks delegated to attendees at the close of a meeting. Next steps often result in deliverables. I believe "next steps" and "action items" are synonymous. Do humanity a favor and avoid both. net-net (n.) The end result, the bottom line, etc. ad infinitum, ad nauseam. "Net-net, we're still ahead." network effects (n.) A wonderfully prosaic term from economics describing how some products or services become more useful as the number of users rises. Online auctions (eBay), operating systems (Windows), and social networks (Facebook) are three oft-used examples. offline (adv.) "Let's discuss this offline." Euphemism frequently uttered in long office meetings meaning: "Let's discuss this later in private because you're way off topic again, idiot." operationalize (v.) A horribly polysyllabic way of saying "carry out" or (gasp) "do." Oh, the humanity! out of pocket (adj.) Out of touch or out of the office for a few days. paradigm [shift] (n.) Paradigm is an extra fancy word for "model." A paradigm shift means moving from one model to a new one, generally in a grand, expensive, and ultimately disastrous manner. If I had a pair of dimes for every time I've heard this one... peel the onion (v. phrase) To conduct a layer-by-layer analysis of a complex problem and in the process, reduce yourself to tears. 17
  18. 18. performance management (n.) A euphemistic way of saying to micro-manage, berate, motivate, psychologically manipulate, threaten, and then fire someone. ping (v.) A "repurposed" UNIX command meaning to send a message to another computer and wait for acknowledgment, ping means to follow up with someone via email on an urgent, but arcane matter and wait interminably for a reply. "I'll ping Henry on the Ewok matter." proactive (adj.) The modern-day antonym of "reactive." Rumor has it that this gem was created in the 1970s out of the parts of lesser words. productize (v.) An fugly word meaning "turn into a product." Why should software vendors offer free technical support when desperate users will pay $3 a minute for help? programmatically (adv.) If your people are too daft to do something correctly, maybe you should look to software programs to automate the task. If you follow this approach, you are completing the task "programmatically." Ugh. pushback (n.) If you have a lot of sound, logical ideas, you're bound to run into a lot of resistance in today's surreal corporations. This resistance, often polite but always absurd, is euphemistically called "pushback." Try not to take it personally: you're dealing with the insane. quick win (n.) Everyone in business is always looking for "quick wins," small steps or initiatives that will produce immediate, positive results. ramp up (v.); ramp-up ( n.) To increase over time. "We intend to ramp up production in anticipation of holiday demand." Just try not to cramp up. 18
  19. 19. reach out (v.) To call or email. For this one, we can blame those old AT&T ads that encouraged folks to "reach out and touch someone." Obviously, you can't actually reach out and TOUCH anyone due to your company's stringent sexual-harrassent policy. But you can "reach out" (but, again, no touching) to a co-worker for information, support, or to start one of those crucial conversations. But keep any interaction to a phone call or email just to be on the safe side. real-time (adj.) Everyone probably has an intuitive understanding of what is meant by "real-time," but that hasn't stopped many companies and consultants from using the term to describe a quixotic concept whereby a company's data is always up-to-date and available to whomever needs it, whenever they need it. repurpose (v.) To take a process or system designed for one task and use it for another -- usually in way unforeseen by its creators. In the fast-moving Internet economy, repurposing has become a viable substitute for true innovation. robust (adj.) Typically used in reference to software, this classic means "not buggy and not a huge waste of resources." Or more precisely, something that works well even under extreme conditions. roll out (v.); roll-out (n.) Companies are constantly introducing new products and services that you don't want or need. The elaborate process of introducing something new is a "roll-out." The verb form is used thusly: "We rolled this piece of crap out to the curbside." rough order of magnitude (n.) Fancy way of saying "to make a wild (ass) guess." scalable (adj.) Describes how flexible a system is in response to increases in scale (number of users, hits, etc.). It might also have something to do with mountain climbing. scope (v.) 19
  20. 20. To set the scope of a product, i.e. to determine what "functionality" will be included. After products are "scoped," they are invariably "descoped" as reality reasserts itself. seamless (adj.) The holy grail with ERP and other complex systems is to produce a "seamless end- to-end solution." The seams are the bottomless pits of hell into which your data falls when transferred from one end of the solution to the other. See also the entries for "end-to-end" and "solution." skip-level (n.) A meeting where big-shot execs ignore the normal corporate hierarchy, jump down a level or two, and slum it with the plebs. socialize (v.) To share a document or plan within an organization, in the vain hope of getting actionable feedback from your "peers." Also, the act of taking Fido to the park to get him used to other dogs. solution (n.) Companies no longer sell products or services; they sell "solutions," which are products or services, but more expensive. soup to nuts (adj.) To build every aspect of something from beginning to end. An integrated approach. Oh, the hubris of it all. space (n.) The final frontier? Are you daft? No, just the niche or market segment your company currently inhabits or hopes to enter. Or, as your CEO might put it, "How can we leverage our core competencies to enter the web-services space?" special sauce / secret sauce (n.) We can thank McDonald's for this one. It's used to refer to anything proprietary. surface (v.) While many of our more jargon-illiterate readers might envision submarines upon first hearing this word, it is used by management professionals as a synonym of 20
  21. 21. "raise," as in "raise concerns." For instance: "I think we need to surface those issues before the product is launched." synergy (n.); synergize (v.) The (often illusory) value gained by combining two or more companies or divisions. Also known as "economies of scope" and "corporate merger BS." takeaway (n.) The essential points of a presentation, activity, etc. that the author hopes you will "take away." Also has something to do with food in the Queen's English. take to the next level (v. phrase) I used to know a guy with a Level 20 Wizard. But seriously, this means to move a product, service, or organization from its current level of dysfunction to the next level of dysfunction. task (v. tr.) Yet another noun turned verb, this one means "to assign." Now go task someone with some deliverables. 30,000 feet, at A high-level view or explanation. Please keep in mind that oxygen is in short supply at this altitude, so you may experience lightheadedness. touch base (v.) A naughty sounding gem, "to touch base" is simply a request to meet again to discuss the current status of a project or task. "Rebecca, I would like to touch base with you later to discuss the Smith account." You gotta think this one leads to a lot of lawsuits... tps reports (n.) Click here for a thorough explanation of TPS Reports. traction (n.) Something you should be trying to gain right now. See "Gain Traction" turnkey solution (n.) 21
  22. 22. Wouldn't it be great if you could buy a complex system or piece of software, plug it in, flip a switch and be off and running? Oh poor Odysseus, you have once again been beguiled by the IT sirens' song. Keep dreaming. value-add (n.) What's the point? No, really, that's what it means. value chain (n.) As I find it impossible to define "value chain" without sullying myself with the very thing that I abhor most (jargon, for those of you keeping score), I've chosen to "borrow" from another site a definition so preposterous that I just had to include it: "a business methodology that helps companies manage marketplace variability and complexity, and align company strategies with execution processes." Thanks for clarifying! value proposition (n.) The unique set of benefits that you offer to customers to sucker them into buying your product or service. Sometimes shortened to "value prop," as in "What's your value prop?" Word. wet signature (n.) I'm not sure I want to touch this one, but apparently this means a human signature, as opposed to an electronic one. I mean, do you plebs still sign stuff? wetware (n.) You, me, your grandma, everyone (assuming you're a carbon-based life form). That is, a human-based solution, as opposed to a hardware, or silicon-based, solution. win-win It's a win for us; it's a win for them. Everyone's happy and drinking the Kool-Aid. world-class (adj.) Means you're best in class, a benchmark. If your product, service or solution ain't world-class, you might as well close up shop and go home. Luckily, everything at your corporation is either world-class now, or will be by next quarter. Or at least that's what management's been telling everyone. Source- http://www.johnsmurf.com/jargon.htm 22
  23. 23. III- Exhaustive list of Management Jargons Above-board [adj.] Honest and open. "I don't think you're being totally above-board with me." Acluistic [adj.] The state of being completely 'without a clue.' Across the piece [exp.] Affecting an entire project or organization. "We're aiming for improvements in efficiency across the piece." Submitted by Clive N. Action [v.] To undertake a given task; to put into practice. "Don't bother me while I'm actioning my deliverables." Submitted by Ryan. Action item [n.] A short term goal that requires a measure of work to complete. Basically a dynamic, proactive version of the things scribbled on your 'to do' list. Actionable [adj.] Originally a legal word referring to anything that affords grounds for a lawsuit. Business people have perverted it to mean anything on which an action can be taken. Address [v.] Used as a replacement for 'do', 'tackle', or 'complete', this word nicely avoids making a commitment to which the speaker can be held accountable. "I will address all of 23
  24. 24. your concerns in the upcoming weeks." Submitted by Russel H. Adhocracy [n.] A minimally structured business where teams are formed as they are needed to address specific problems. Administrivia [n.] A term that encompasses all the trivial tasks that management is far too qualified to suffer through. Adoption process [n.] The customer's steps along the path from cautious cynic to submissive consumer of your product. Agreeance [n.] A fancier way of saying agreement. "Are we in agreeance?" Air it out [v.] To discuss an issue openly. "I heard you had a problem with some of our business practices. Let's get your team together and air it out this afternoon." Al Desco [adj.] Describes any meal eaten at your desk (you have our sympathies if it's dinner). "I slept in so I'm having breakfast Al Desco." ALAP [adj.] As Late As Possible. Describes meeting a deadline at the last possible moment in order to avoid receiving additional work. "I finished it last week, but I'm going to submit it ALAP." Submitted by JC. All-hands meeting [n.] A mandatory meeting for all employees. "Bob called an all-hands 24
  25. 25. meeting this afternoon. It's never a good sign when he's willing to freeze the whole department for an hour." Let the navy keep the nautical slang. Alpha geek [n.] The head of your company's IT department. Alpha pup [n.] Trendsetting young people. Important targets for marketing to this age group. "Let's get six alpha pups in here for a focus group." Amped [adj.] Having a large amount of excitement and energy. "I'm so amped about this new product line." Anacronym [n.] An acronym that is so old, no one remembers the original phrase. Examples include RADAR, ASCII, and SNAFU. Anecgloat [n.] A story of one's exploits that is intended to impress. May be partly fictional. Anointed [n.] An employee that can't seem to do anything wrong in the eyes of management. Anonymize [v.] To make anonymous. Anticipointment [n.] The feeling that something didn't live up to its hype. Apple polish [v.] To suck-up, flatter. Armchair general [n.] Someone who speaks critically, but has no experience in the field in question. 25
  26. 26. Arrows to fire [exp.] Points to use in an argument. "Now if you don't have anymore arrows to fire, I think we're finished here." Assignment capsule [n.] A clearly defined job description or task. "Stop arguing about objectives and start handing out assignment capsules." Assmosis [v.] The apparent absorption of success that comes from sucking up. At this juncture [exp.] Now. "We're not prepared to go public at this juncture." Availability [n.] A convenient way of separating the individual from the ability to manage her own time. "I'd love to come, but I'm not sure about my availability, grandma." Submitted by Sam K. B-school [n.] Business school. "We were tight back in b-school." Back door [adj.] Unethical or dishonest. Back-of-the- Has been heard describing anything envelope [adj.] completed in a quick, casual manner, although it most often references the informal calculations made by engineering and finance types. Bad paper [n.] A payment made in worthless currency (cash or cheque). Bag of snakes [n.] A business situation with many unexpected problems. 26
  27. 27. Bait and switch [v.] To advertise low priced items that aren't actually available. Baked-in [adj.] Included. "Those options are already baked in with this model." Ballpark [v.] To make an estimate. "Can you ballpark the cost per unit for me?" Thanks to Alden C. for the correction. Band-aid [v.] To apply a trivial solution to a problem. "We'll band-aid the situation for now." Bandwidth [n.] The physical and mental limit of your working ability. "I don't have the bandwidth for another project right now." Let the techies keep this word, seriously. Bang for the buck [n.] The return on invested money. Bangalored [v.] Having been fired after your position was transferred to India. "Last month they bangalored our entire tech support department." Bankroll [v.] To finance. "We can't afford to bankroll another research project in this area." Banner year [n.] The best year in history for a given firm. Most likely, you're not having one of these. Barnburner [n.] An exciting situation. Base-tending [v.] To guard one's assets. Bat a thousand [exp.] A baseball term meaning a 100% 27
  28. 28. success rate. Batting average [n.] Indicates the percentage of time that someone or something is successful. "We need to bring up our batting average in the overseas market." Battle rhythm [n.] A logistical plan. "We're not leaving that conference room until we establish a battle rhythm for this project." Submitted by Dan. Bean-counter [n.] A derogatory term for an accountant. "The bean-counters are coming in for another audit next week." Beat the bushes [v.] Marketing to unconventional or rural areas. Beauty contest [n.] A competitive pitching situation. "Bring in the next firm; I want to wrap up this beauty contest before my 4 o'clock tee off." Submitted by Crazy Renee. Beef up [v.] To make stronger. Behind the eight In a difficult position. ball [exp.] Bell [n.] A phone call. "Give us a bell before you leave work today." Submitted by Vicki D. Bell ringer [n.] A door to door salesman. Belts and Proceeding with an overabundance suspenders [exp.] of caution. "Make sure we're belts and suspenders before those quotes 28
  29. 29. go out." Submitted by Crazy Renee. Best in breed [adj.] Alleged or perceived superior quality among similar products offered by competing companies. Generally used as an excuse to explain a noticeable price difference. “We’ve always specialized in bringing products to the market that are best in breed.” Best practices [n.] Procedures and policies that have shown to be the most effective. Betamaxed [adj.] When a product has been overtaken by an inferior, but well marketed alternative. Big enchilada [n.] An important person within an organization. Big learn [n.] The process of gaining skills that are difficult to master. "We know things didn't go very well, but you have to remember that it's been a big learn for us all." Submitted by Russell H. Birdtable [v.] To meet and discuss an issue before assigning tasks. "We'll birdtable the new schedule tomorrow." Submitted by Steve S. Black box [n.] New and unfamiliar technology about which uninformed decisions are often made. Blamestorming [v.] Meeting to discuss a failure and find a scapegoat. 29
  30. 30. Bleed [v.] Extract a large sum of money from an organization or individual. Bleeding-edge [adj.] Something even more current than the 'cutting-edge'. Reserved for only the most novel (read: hyped) technologies. Bloatation [v.] Filling non-essential positions instead of core staff. Usually occurs just before bankruptcy. Blow by blow [exp.] To cover all the details. Blow hot and cold [v.] To frequently change one's mind. Blow-in [n.] Advertising materials inserted between the pages of a magazine that you'll spend 10 minutes removing before it's readable. Blue hairs [exp.] A derogatory term for a female seniors. Blue money [n.] Funds spent quickly and recklessly. Submitted by Yuri Blue ocean [n.] A metaphor for the wider, deeper potential of market space that is not yet explored. "I look at the sales opportunities in front of you clowns, and all I see is blue, blue ocean." Suggested by Indranil. Blue-sky thinking [n.] A thought exercise where any possibility is considered. Sumbitted by Patti BOHICA [exp.] Bend Over Here It Comes Again. 30
  31. 31. Boiler room [n.] A sales firm with questionable practices. Boiling the frog [v.] The art of managing change so smoothly that it goes unnoticed. From the overused, possibly bogus cliché claiming that frogs will jump directly out of boiling water, but will happily perish when heated slowly. Submitted by Jeff I. Boiling the ocean [v.] Attempting to do something with too broad a scope. This is generally in reference to a project or initiative to avoid. "The client is living a pipe dream; when are they going to stop trying to boil the ocean?" Submitted by w3. Book the goods [v.] A really slick way of saying 'place an order.' "Make sure you book the goods before you take off this afternoon." Boondoggle [n.] An unethical use of public money. Boot camp [n.] A company training program. Boot strap business [n.] A company started with very little capital. Bottom fishing [v.] Purchasing stocks that have a very low value. Bottom line it [exp.] To summarize. "I don't have time to read your progress report. Can you bottom line it for me?" Submitted by Linda Bounce [v.] To be removed forcefully, fired. 31
  32. 32. Bouncebackability [n.] The ability to reverse a losing situation and then succeed. Submitted by Paul G. Bow wave [n.] The initial effects caused by upper management changes. "The bow wave might hit them a little hard, but they'll get over it." Submitted by Guy from Melbourne. Brain dump [v.] To extract the knowledge of an expert employee for the benefit of others. Brandatories [n.] All of the branding elements that must be included in a given ad or campaign. "Make sure the brandatories are in place before the shoot begins." Submitted by Andy B. Brass tacks [n.] 1) Fundamental business information or practices. "We need to scale back R & D and get back to brass tacks." 2) The raw material required for a company's core products. Submitted by Pulkit B. Break your To harm or insult another person. "I crayons [exp.] don't mean to break your crayons, but your performance has been terrible lately." Brick and mortar [adj.] A business with a physical location and building, as opposed to the basements and garages that most online retailers ship from. Bricks-to-clicks [exp.] When a traditional company realizes 32
  33. 33. that a website is necessary to stay competitive. Bring to the table [exp.] The contribution (or lack thereof) that one makes to a group. "What do you feel you would bring to the table if you were hired for this position?" Bronx cheer [n.] A loud sound expressing dislike, made by sticking out your tongue and blowing; a raspberry. Thanks to Rod for the correction. Brown-bag [v.] To discuss a topic at a later time, over lunch. "Let's brown-bag your idea and get this meeting back on track." Submitted by Ben. Bubble it up [v.] To send an issue to the next-higher level of management. "I've noted your concern and I'll bubble it up before the end of the week." Submitted by Charley O. Bucket shop [n.] A place where questionable deals occur. Bucketize [v.] To organize information into logical groups. "Let's take a moment to bucketize our ideas." Horrendous. Submitted by Mo. Build [n.] Borrowed from software types, this term has been heard referencing a revision or addition to a piece of text. "Still working on that report? Make sure I have the latest build by this afternoon." Submitted by Q. 33
  34. 34. Bullish [adj.] To be in favour of. "I'm feeling bullish about this new product." Burn rate [n.] The speed at which a resource (usually cash) is being used up in a given company or project. "We need to get our burn rate under control, so we're letting a few of you go." Bush league [adj.] A baseball reference describing anything amateurish or unprofessional. "That bush league secretary hung up on our biggest client while putting him on hold." Thanks to Ed L. for the correction. Business-end [n.] The part of an object that performs an action. "I looked up from my desk and found myself staring down the business-end of a 9 millimeter." Business-macho [adj.] Describes a male office worker with his shirt opened too far at the neck -- at least one button beyond what could be considered business casual. Often accented with tufts of chest hair and/or gold chains. Submitted by David R. Business- Work attire that is sexy to the point provocative [adj.] of being inappropriate. "I see Kim has decided that the dress code for today is business-provocative." Buy-in [exp.] To agree with a particular position. "How can we obtain management buy-in on this idea?" Buzz [n.] Excited discussion in the media and between individuals. Closely linked 34
  35. 35. to word-of-mouth advertising. Buzzworthy [adj.] A novel idea or product that has the potential to generate public interest in its own right. "These proposals are all terrible. Why can't you morons come up with something buzzworthy?" C-level [adj.] Describes the people at the top of a company that get fancy 'C' titles such as C.E.O., C.F.O., C.O.O. 35
  36. 36. Cabinet condom [n.] Tape applied to the button of a filing cabinet to prevent it from being locked (since the key has long since disappeared.) Cafeteria plan [n.] A package of benefits that allows the employee to make choices. Calendar tickler [n.] A calendar entry with a reminder alarm. Usually sent as an Outlook meeting request. "Put a tickler on my calendar so I won't forget to join the call." Submitted by Erika S. Call on the carpet [v.] To discipline. Can I stir fry an idea in Could I have your opinion on this your think-wok? [exp.] issue? Credited to David A. Cannibalize [v.] To launch a new product that takes market share away from one's own established products. Thanks to Dwayne S. for the correction. Capsizing [v.] Laying-off employees (downsizing) to the point where an organization can no longer function. Career Limiting Move An action or comment that could 36
  37. 37. (CLM) [n.] hinder the future progression of one's career. Career suicide [n.] An action that causes you to lose both your current job, and any chance you'll find another one in your field. "If you blow the whistle on this operation, it'll be career suicide." Carpool tunnel The semi-conscious state that is the syndrome [n.] result of repeated early morning ride sharing. Carrots and sticks [n.] Incentives. "If we're going to make this sale, we need a few more carrots and sticks." Carte blanche [exp.] The freedom to make any and all decisions. CFO [n.] Chief Finagle Officer. The person who's responsible for manipulating a company's finances to avoid legal penalties. Chainsaw An individual brought in to do consultant [n.] management's dirty work at lay-off time. Change agent [n.] A clever title for a consultant (or employee) who sees himself as a 37
  38. 38. catalyst for improvement. Often involves encouraging the adoption of new technologies. Change The act of guiding a company management [v.] through internal or external changes. Submitted by Clive N. Charm school [n.] A derogatory term for new manager training. "After the harassment case, my boss was shipped off to charm school." Chartists [n.] Market analysts who have made a career of graphing financial data. Chasing down Placing sales calls to industrial smokestacks [exp.] companies. Checked Eskimo [v.] When a clearly unqualified individual lands a job or promotion they should have had no chance at getting, that person must have "Checked Eskimo" on the application. Submitted by David. Cheese chew [v.] Performing an unwelcome chore to please another. Submitted by Rob T. 38
  39. 39. Chicken shop [n.] A department or company that produces substandard work. "Their parts had a 20% scrap rate last quarter. I'm never dealing with that chicken shop again." Submitted by Rod SW. Chinese wall [exp.] Procedures to guard information. Circle-back [v.] Revisiting an issue after it has been addressed. Using this one habitually could lead you to say something like, "I'm heading to lunch now, but we'll circle-back later." Submitted by Randi. Circular file [n.] The garbage can. "Toss that company newsletter in the circular file for me." Cleans up well [adj.] Describes a technician or software developer who can actually speak with the customer without embarrassing the company. Clocksucker [n.] A completely unproductive employee; a waste of company money. Submitted by Lee. Close of play [n.] The deadline for the submission of an order or application, as spoken in 39
  40. 40. parts of the world where cricket lingo and business jargon are equally familiar. Suggested by Bill F. COB [n.] Close Of Business. That magic moment that comes but once each day -- quitting time. Submitted by our spies at a Fortune 100. Column-shaking [v.] Threatening to uproot the traditions (or bad habits) of a company, usually with new and unconventional ideas. Come to Jesus A term of southern American origin meeting [n.] that refers to a serious meeting with an individual or team. These meetings often involve ultimatums for performance improvement. Submitted by aclassicgirl. Commonplate [v.] To present a topic for consideration, so that all members of a group have the same information (ostensibly, as if everyone were eating from a 'common plate'). "Now that I've commonplated the issue, can we come to a reasonable decision?" Community The shared assets of a married property [n.] couple. 40
  41. 41. Comp [adj.] The cool way to say complimentary. Contrarian [n.] An investor who makes decisions in opposition to mainstream ideas. Cook the books [v.] A fraudulent attempt to falsify company records. Cookie-cutter [adj.] A generic person, product or approach. "I'm so tired of these cookie-cutter business grads. When are we going to find someone with a brain in their head?" Cooperative A classic management oxymoron competition [n.] presumably referring to mutual benefits experienced by two competing firms. Coopetition [n.] The ruthless struggle between an organization's departments for limited budget dollars, staff and equipment, despite the fact that everyone involved should be supporting the overall mission. Symptoms include the hoarding of copy paper, conference room time- slots, and the IT guy. Suggested by Aidan. Core competencies [n.] A company's most successful skills 41
  42. 42. and activities. Often leveraged. Cost containment [n.] An attempt to reduce expenditures. Counterposing [v.] When ground-level staff outwit management by using more jargon, more pointless questions, and more vague commitments than their superiors. Submitted by Captn Freedom. Covered-off [adj.] Describes something that has been completed or otherwise taken care of. "Let's make sure those requirements are covered-off." Submitted by Garry. Cowboy [n.] A worker that is difficult to supervise. CPB [v.] Conducting Personal Business. Using company resources and time for things that aren't work-related (there's a good chance you're doing it right now). CPS [n.] Cheap Plastic S***. Promotional items (often made of plastic) distributed through advertising, corporate gifts, trade shows, or other give-away programs. 42
  43. 43. Submitted by Jocelyn S. Critical mass [n.] 1) The point reached by a new idea or product just prior to explosive market growth. 2) The point when an issue can no longer be avoided and must be addressed immediately. Criticality [n.] An extreme level of importance. Whatever your colleague meant, there's a good chance she's not talking about a nuclear accident. "I cannot emphasize the criticality of this issue enough." Submitted by Shane H. Cronyism [n.] Playing favourites among close associates. Cross sabers [v.] To have a conflict. Cross-pollination [n.] The generation of ideas that can occur when individuals from diverse backgrounds are brought together. "By removing your cubicle walls, we hope to cultivate the opportunity for cross-pollination." Cross-training [v.] Learning a colleague's job so you can perform it, in addition to your own, when they disappear during 43
  44. 44. vacation, maternity leave, or the latest round of layoffs. Submitted by Isabella. Cubicle vultures [n.] Those who gather office supplies from the desk of a fired co-woker. Cut the mustard [exp.] To perform adequately. CYA [v.] Cover Your Ass. To exercise caution to avoid blame. "You better CYA on this one. We can't afford the bad press." Cybernate [v.] To control via a computer. Cyberslacking [v.] Wasting company time by casually browsing the Internet or instant messaging. Submitted by Mike. Cycle [n.] An employee's time, broken down into sections. "I'll have to check if she has any available cycles for this task." Submitted by Renee. D-PAD [v.] Downloading Porn All Day. When an employee has nothing to do. "Now that the project is finished, I'm looking forward to a little D-PAD." 44
  45. 45. Submitted by minorfall. Data-point [n.] An area of factual inquiry. Submitted by Joe O. De-integrate [v.] To disassemble. "We're going to have to de-integrate the entire assembly and start from scratch." De-layering [v.] An excuse to fire every other link in the chain without reducing the total workload. (see also, Empowerment) Submitted by Jane W. De-tune [v.] To minimize in style or message. Synonym: tone-down. "You really need to de-tune those hideous slides." Submitted by Natalie R. Dead stick [adj.] Describes a project that has lost momentum. This is an aviation term used when a plane is on the verge of losing control. Submitted by Derrick. Dead wood [n.] An employee that no longer contributes anything meaningful to an organization. Deceptionist [n.] A receptionist whose job is actually to delay or block potential visitors. Ruthless with a polite, perfect smile. Deck [n.] A PowerPoint slide presentation. "Clean up those slides before you even think about running that deck again." Submitted by Gomo. 45
  46. 46. Decruit [v.] A clever euphemism for firing senior employees. "The board is pushing for decruitment." Submitted by Amanda G. Deep dive [n.] An in-depth study. Deep pockets [n.] Rich investors. "We need to get a few more deep pockets involved in this venture." Deep six [exp.] A military term meaning 'to dispose of.' Deferred success [n.] A term used to postpone the declaration of failure, as if a positive result is guaranteed (just not right now). "The project was a deferred success; we're confident that things will pick up in the next quarter." Submitted by Aidan. Dehire [v.] To fire. Deja moo [exp.] The nagging feeling that you've heard this BS before. Delagatorship [n.] A business entity run by someone incapable of decision-making. Submitted by Matt F. Deliver the goods [v.] To come through on an agreement. Deselect [v.] To fire or let go. "We need to deselect 5 people from your department to meet our cost targets for the year." Submitted by Don. Desk dive [n.] The painful crawl underneath your 46
  47. 47. desk to unplug equipment or fetch a dropped item. Often accompanied by a few grunts if one is overweight. Submitted by Jessica. Desk jockey [exp.] An office worker. If you're enjoying yourself here, this might be a good name for you. Deskfast [n.] Breakfast eaten at your desk. Dial and smile [n.] Phone calls intended to recruit new customers. Dial-in [v.] A simply terrible way to say 'include'. "I'd like to dial-in the marketing department on this one." Dialogue [v.] To have a conversation. Another innocent noun turned into a painful verb, "Let's dialogue later about the Miller account." Dialogue marketing [n.] A marketing strategy that intends to create a rapport with the customer. Different breed [adj.] Something unusual. It is often used as a derogatory reference to a person. Digerati [n.] An elite group of people that know more about computers than you ever will. Dime store [n.] A business selling very cheap items. DINK [n.] Double Income, No Kids. Dinosaur [n.] A long-term company employee whose extensive experience is only 47
  48. 48. surpassed by his resistance to change. Submitted by Aaron D. Dirty laundry [n.] Questionable business practices or materials that an organization would prefer to remain undisclosed. Dirty pool [exp.] Unethical practices. "Her lawyers are really playing dirty pool on this one." Disambiguate [v.] An ironic 5-syllable word used in place of 'clarify.' Disconnect [n.] An inconsistency or problem. Yet another example of the business world making a terrible noun out of a perfectly good verb. Disimpress [v.] To reverse a favourable impression with subsequent behaviour. "We liked him after the first interview, but he really disimpressed us in the second round." Submitted by Jason I. Disincentivize [v.] To eliminate the motivation to make a particular choice. Use this one at your own risk. Disintermediate [v.] The process of removing the middle man. Lord help us. Doability [adj.] Used to describe whether an activity can be undertaken. "I need to confirm the doability of that request." Submitted by Beneboy Dog [n.] A badly performing product or 48
  49. 49. company. Dog and pony show [n.] A presentation that's insultingly simplistic. Dogfooding [v.] The practice of forcing developers to use their own product (or 'eat their own dog food') to understand what the customer is subjected to. One step further than product testing, this is often a good cure for engineering arrogance. Submitted by Programmer Type. DOMA [exp.] Die Or Move Away. One way in which to lose customers. DOMO [exp.] DOwnwardly MObile. A young person who changes their priorities and quits a high paying, demanding position. Don't f*** with Blunt advice about avoiding payroll [exp.] romantic or sexual relationships with co-workers. Submitted by Max Don't fight the Don't oppose what the market tape [exp.] dictates. Dopeler effect [exp.] The principle that stupid ideas sound better when they come at you quickly. Double dip [v.] To retire, but then start another career. Double-time [exp.] A military term meaning to act quickly. "Get that invoice out double- time!" 49
  50. 50. Dovetail [v.] To expand upon a fellow employee's idea. Claiming it as your own is optional. Submitted by Johnny P. Down and dirty [adj.] To perform a task quickly without an immediate consideration of quality. Down round [n.] A period in which a company's value is decreasing in the eyes of investors. Downsize [v.] To reduce the size of a workforce. Often begins with requests for voluntary resignations and ends with a series of layoffs. Drill down [v.] To look into thoroughly. "Let's meet this afternoon and drill down on this one." Drink from the To be inundated with information. firehose [v.] Submitted by Crazy Renee. Drink the Kool-aid [v.] To accept company policy without question. Drive beyond the To get ahead of oneself. "Stop me if headlights [v.] I'm driving beyond my headlights here, but I want to share an amazing home-based business with you that could change your life." Submitted by Crazy Renee. Drop-dead date [n.] The REAL deadline. Missing it often means dire consequences. Dub-dub-dub [n.] A quicker (and nerdier) way to refer to the beginning of a website address or the world wide web in general. "You have to check out dub- 50
  51. 51. dub-dub dot..." Submitted by Chandra C. Duck shove [AUS-n.] The act of passing an undesirable job or inquiry to an unsuspecting third party. "I just duck shoved all the paperwork to Jonathon." Duck shuffler [n.] Someone who disrupts your affairs after you've finally gotten all your 'ducks in a row.' Ducks in a row [exp.] To become organized. Due Diligence [n.] The thoroughness required to ensure success in business decision- making. Submitted by Pulkit B. Ear candy [n.] Flattery. Ear job [n.] The act of passing on some juicy company gossip verbally, and in private. "I'm just running into a meeting, but I'll give you an ear job later." Submitted by Randi H. Easy mark [n.] A person that is not difficult to cheat. Eat a reality An 'action' necessary when one's sandwich [exp.] ideas are completely inappropriate for the given situation. "I can't believe your last suggestion. You better eat a reality sandwich before you walk back in that boardroom." Eat the frog [v.] To complete an unpleasant job that 51
  52. 52. has been well procrastinated. "Just eat the frog and get on with it!" Submitted by Emma-Dawn L. Econometrics [n.] Known by consultants to be the act of simply plugging numbers into a pre-made spreadsheet, yet externally marketed (to those will not ask detailed questions) as a highly scientific analytic modeling exercise performed by economists and industry-specific experts. Ego surfing [v.] Searching the web for references to yourself. Come on, you know you've tried it. Eighty-six [v.] To dispose of. "We have to eighty-six these documents or we'll all be crucified." Elephants [n.] Large investment groups that tend to move together. Eleventh hour [exp.] The last moment. Empty suits [n.] Unthinking middle management. Enabler [n.] Something that must be in place before something else can occur. Enail [n.] An email sent for the sole purpose of making a point in writing, usually at another person's expense. Most effective when cc'ed to as many senior people as possible. Submitted by Ian C. Enthuse [v.] To inspire enthusiasm (or attempt to). "I'm still looking for a way to 52
  53. 53. enthuse the new hires." Submitted indirectly by Andy P. EPON [n.] Endless Pit Of Need. A colleague who continually seeks support for their ongoing personal and professional problems. Submitted by M. Schroeder. Evangelize [v.] To promote a product with the enthusiasm of a true believer. "We need distributors to evangelize the new line in the local markets." Submitted by Nicky T. Even dead cats Even worthless things can rise in bounce [exp.] value again. Exploding offer [n.] A job offer that expires after a certain date. Extract the max [v.] To achieve the highest level of productivity possible while directing a group of people. "I hope my management style will extract the max from each and every one of you." Extrapediately [adv.] Faster than ASAP and quicker than STAT, this made-up word is saved for when a task must be accomplished almost instantaneously. Submitted by CM & JC. Extraview [n.] A second interview you feel obliged to hold even though the position has already been filled. Can also be scheduled when the candidate is just so damn hot. 53
  54. 54. F2F [exp.] A really cute way of saying face-to- face. Face time [n.] 1) The opportunity to sit down to discuss an issue in person. "I've been trying to get a little face time with the boss to go over this proposal, but she keeps blowing me off." 2) Unproductive time spent at the office meant to project the image that you're a hardworking employee. Updated by Randi H. Facipulate [v.] An unfortunate mix of 'facilitate' and 'manipulate', this contrived verb refers to influencing the course of a discussion by indirectly promoting particular lines of thought. Submitted by Ed T. Fact pattern [n.] A set of supporting evidence. "Mary keeps calling in sick on the day of the sales presentations. Interesting fact pattern, don't you think?" Submitted by Bob S. Fairy dust [n.] The finishing touches on a project. "Sprinkle the fairy dust on that one for me, will ya?" Submitted by Steve B. Fall guy [n.] A scapegoat. After the buck is passed through the entire organization, it stops at this unfortunate person. Fallen angels [n.] Investments that once performed well but have declined in value. 54
  55. 55. Featherbedding [v.] Keeping jobs that aren't needed in order to please the union. Feature creep [v.] The tendency to continually add more features during the development of a product. Feeding frenzy [n.] Intense buying by consumers. Fenestration [n.] Windows. Please, please just say windows. "This 10th floor rental unit has excellent fenestration." File thirteen [n.] The garbage can. Finger-of-blame [n.] An arbitrary method for selecting the person who will take responsibility for a mistake. Used most accurately when the blame is out of proportion with the actual error. "Uh-oh... the finger-of-blame finds ... YOU!" Submitted by DJ. Fire away [exp.] Proceed whenever you're ready. Fire fighting [v.] Addressing a problem that must be solved immediately. "We've been fire fighting since last quarter's numbers were released." Fish or cut bait [exp.] To be forced to make a decision. "We're getting to the point where we have to either fish or cut bait on this one." Fishbowl [exp.] To be in the public spotlight. Fishing expedition [n.] 1) A fact-finding mission. 2) A concerted effort to find 55
  56. 56. something -- anything -- wrong. Submitted by Vic P. Fit for purpose [adj.] Any good. "We need to evaluate whether this new software is fit for purpose." Submitted by Sue A. Flight risk [n.] An employee that is thought to be considering quitting. Flub [v.] To miss. Fluff it and fly it [v.] To make cosmetic improvements and then sell an item. Flunky [n.] A worker at the bottom of the corporate food chain. Flush [adj.] Possessing a large amount of money. Flying circus [n.] A flight by company management to inspect local operations. Food chain [n.] An organization's hierarchy. "I'm going to send this up the food chain for approval." Submitted by D Ochoa. Foot on the ball Borrowed from football, this is a time [UK-n.] chance to pause and gain control of a situation. "If you don't give me a little more foot on the ball time, I'm going to blow this presentation." Submitted by Sean. Foreseeable future [n.] A conveniently flexible period of upcoming time that is often spoken about by management. 56

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