CoMo@uum11

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Presentation at the Ubiquitous User Modeling Workshop, May 16-17, 2011, Haifa, Israel
http://www.cri.haifa.ac.il/events/2011/UbiqModelWorkshop/Home.html

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CoMo@uum11

  1. 1.   CoMo: Supporting collaborative group work using mobile phones in Veterinary Training<br />Yishay Mor<br />1<br />
  2. 2. The CoMo project<br />PI: Niall Winters, London Knowledge Lab<br />2007-2008, collaboration with Kim Whittlestone, Royal Veterinary College, <br />funded by Centre for Distance Education, University of London<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />2<br />
  3. 3. Context: The RVC rotations<br />
  4. 4. Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modeling Workshop , Haifa, May 2011<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Methodology<br />Observe: ethnographic study of the particular context of learning. Following learners through their daily routine, recording their actions with video and stills, interviewing students and tutors inaction. <br />=> identify the existing ecology of resources, common practices and needs.<br />Identify: gaps in existing practice, which can be addressed by new technology.<br />Blend: how will the new technology, & new practices derived from it, fit in with the existing ecology.<br />Sketch: draw visual scenarios of specific activities in which the new technology plays a part.<br />Poll: present these sketches to as wide an audience as possible, collect feedback and adjust the design.<br />Enhance: deploy the technology, guide learners in using it to improve their learning experience.<br />Perturb: challenge learners and teachers with new possibilities emerging from the technology as they have adopted it.<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />5<br />
  6. 6. Stage I: Teacher Interviews<br />Collect narratives of current practices<br />Construct thick descriptions of learning contexts (user stories)<br />Identify teacher ( & learner) concerns<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />6<br />
  7. 7. Example: teacher input<br />Year 4 and 5 students spend most of their 2nd term on rotations, in groups of 5-6. Each week each group joins one hospital department or get distributed between vets in the field, and participate in clinical work.<br />During hospital rotations students have tutorials, where they meet with their academic tutor and discuss the cases they saw.<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Example: User Story<br />Elizabeth is out on EMS and is being driven by her supervising vet to a farm where they have a cow which they suspect may be pregnant.  Whilst in the car Elizabeth uses her phone to log into her myPad and searches for Haptic.  She locates an entry see made whilst she was in the 4th year about her experiences of using the Haptic cow to feel a pregnant cow.  She discusses her findings with her supervising Vet. <br />The Vet raises some interesting points regarding feeling for pregnancy and so Elizabeth sends an SMS noting the points to her myPad. <br />Later on Elizabeth logs onto myPad from a full browser and locates the Haptic entry she was viewing earlier whilst in the car on the way to the farm.  She edits the entry and adds the note that she sent into her myThoughts area earlier.  She uses the formatting options to quote the points the supervising vet made to her and comments on her feelings towards them. <br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Student Concerns<br /><ul><li>Highly motivated and dedicated to the profession. Seeking ways to improve their learning.
  10. 10. Concerned about the responsibility they will face as novice clinicians.
  11. 11. Need to master detailed procedural knowledge for a very broad spectrum of situations.
  12. 12. Not confident in their knowledge and their peers. Seek authority.
  13. 13. High study load. Very little free time during rotations (but a lot of dead time).</li></ul>Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />9<br />
  14. 14. Teacher Concerns<br /><ul><li>More concerned about students' meta-skills:
  15. 15. observation, diagnosis, analysis
  16. 16. Want to promote reflective practice and collaborative learning.
  17. 17. Keeping in touch with students on rotation is a challenge</li></ul>Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />10<br />
  18. 18. Stage II: Ethnographic Observations<br />11<br />
  19. 19. What’s in your pocket?<br />12<br />
  20. 20. Current Practice<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />13<br />Taking Notes<br />Tutorial<br />
  21. 21. Stage III: Scenario-based Interview<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />14<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />
  22. 22. The Cafeteria Procedure<br />Distributed scenarios to groups of students with the instructions:<br /><ul><li>Go through the scenario, "put yourself in the picture".
  23. 23. Ask for clarifications where they are needed (if you don't understand something - it's our fault!)
  24. 24. Add your comments on the side.
  25. 25. Add your details on the top if you wish to be contacted / participate in the experiment.</li></ul>Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />15<br />
  26. 26. The Como scenario<br /><ul><li>Snap
  27. 27. Tag
  28. 28. Blog
  29. 29. Revisit
  30. 30. Review
  31. 31. Co-Reflect</li></ul>Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />
  32. 32. Snap!<br />During clinical session, one student uses the camera phone to take visual notes, while the others  use the clipboards as usual.<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />
  33. 33. Tag!<br />Tags: dog, cat scan, epilepsyDescription: notice the twitching leg.<br />The same student quickly tags and uploads the visual note<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />
  34. 34. Blog!<br />Notes are collated on group blog, to serve as anchors for subsequent reflections.<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />
  35. 35. Revist<br />Students use "dead time" to add questions and observations from their notes as comments.<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />
  36. 36. Review<br />Question: ....?Observation:..Observation:..Question: ....?Question: ....?<br />Tutor reviews students contributions in preparation for tutorial session.<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />
  37. 37. Co-Reflect (tutorial)<br />Using remote conferencing, and referring to the blog, tutor addresses issues which emerge from this week's experiences.<br />
  38. 38. Stage IV: design & deploy<br />Collated student feedback to scenarios.<br />Collected teacher responses to student feedback.<br />Updated scenario & implemented:<br />N70 phones + ShoZu + Flickr<br />Short induction period for each student group<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />23<br />
  39. 39. CoMo<br />24<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />
  40. 40. Student use<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />25<br />Social: social relationships between student are an important support framework<br />Memory jog: snapshots of key incidents facilitated group reflection<br />Clinical subjects and procedures were documented for discussion<br />Temporal analysis: students documented case progression over time<br />
  41. 41. Note taking<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />26<br />
  42. 42. Documenting Procedures<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />27<br />
  43. 43. Documenting Procedures<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />28<br />
  44. 44. Tracking a Case<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modeling Workshop , Haifa, May 2011<br />29<br />
  45. 45. Capturing Data<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />30<br />
  46. 46. The New Tutorial<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />31<br />
  47. 47. Social<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />32<br />
  48. 48. Learning Gains<br />Allowed tutors and students to discuss “the case presentations”<br />Gave teachers a “window on what the students’ attention was” <br />“I took a picture of something I didn't think would be that interesting, something we do everyday . . . it reminded [student A] of a point in rounds she wanted to bring up”<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />33<br />
  49. 49. Questions<br />What can we do now that we couldn’t do then?<br />What do existing off the shelf technologies offer in terms of learner modelling, and how can LM augment learning?<br />Is the methodology relevant for you?<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />34<br />
  50. 50. Acknowledgements<br />Niall Winters, CoMo PI<br />Natasha Lackovic, researcher<br />Kim Whittlestone, Senior Lecturer in Independent Learning<br />Dr. Matthew Pead, Senior Lecturer in Orthopaedic Surgery and Head of the Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Group<br />Arthur House, European Specialist in Small Animal Surgery and Lecturer in Small Animal Surgery<br />Richard Coe, European Veterinary Specialist in Surgery and Temporary Lecturer in Small Animal Surgery<br />All our student participants<br />Yishay Mor - CoMo – Ubiquitous User Modelling Workshop, Haifa, May 2011<br />35<br />

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