Non-Communicable Disease and Its Economic Burden

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Non-Communicable Disease and Its Economic Burden

  1. 1. NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Definition and burden. By: Ahmad Abid bin Abas (2) Ahmad Asyraf bin Mohamed (3)
  2. 2. Defining NCDs• Diseases of long duration, generally slow progression and they are the major cause of adult mortality and morbidity worldwide.(WHO 2005)• 4 major NCDs contributing most of NCDs deaths: – CVD, Cancer, Chronic respiratory disease, DM
  3. 3. Global burden of NCDs
  4. 4. • Of the 57 million global deaths in 2008, 36 million or 63% were due to NCDs.• Annual NCD deaths are projected to rise to 52 million by 2030, accounting for 75% of all deaths• Reference : WHO publications, Regional Office for South East Asia.
  5. 5. ECONOMIC BURDEN
  6. 6. How to Calculate the Econ. Burden of Health Problems?1) The cost of illness approach (COI) (most common method used)- medical cost, on-medical cost and income losses.2) The economic growth approach (value of lost output)3) The value of statistical life approach (VSL)
  7. 7. E.g. - Economic Growth Approach,(impact on NCDs mortality to GDP
  8. 8. Demonstrating the Economic Burden of NCDs
  9. 9. Demonstrating the Economic Burden of NCDs
  10. 10. Disease Economy
  11. 11. Disease Economy• General Perspective : - Deprive individual’s health and productive potential - Challenges household’s income and savings - Compete investment’s activities• Countries’ Perspective : - Reduce life expectancy and economy downturn - Depleting country’s labour force - Lower GDP and GNI
  12. 12. References• WHO working paper : An estimation of economic impact of chronic NCDs in selected countries. (2006)• A report from World Economic Forum and the Harvard School of Public Health. (September 2011)

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