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The Battle of Gallipoli
1915-1916
The Battle of Çanakkale
1915-1916
The Battle of Gallipoli/The Battle of Çanakkale “which proved to be an
allied fiasco and savage defeat in World War I neve...
The Six Great Powers before 1914
British Empire (Great Britain)- France - Russia (Empire) - Germany - Austria-Hungary - Ot...
What is the Turkish word for Gallipoli?
Geilibolu.
The original place called Gelibolu is a little fishing village, by the ...
What does the acronym ANZAC stand for?
Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.
The force was put together in Egypt where th...
So what of Lone Pine?
Much may have been forgotten about the ‘fame’ of Gallipoli but two locations are still well
known:
•...
What other troops fought alongside the ANZACS at Gallipoli?
What were the casualties?
Apart from the New Zealanders and Au...
What two (2) strange firearms were invented at Gallipoli?
• The Periscope Rifle – to shoot from concealment in the trenche...
What nearby Greek Islands became the operations base for the
ANZAC Offensive?
The islands of:
• Lemnos: 80 kms from Gallip...
What significant Gallipoli Landmark was given a name associated
with Egypt?
The Sphinx.
An outcrop on the Sari Bair range,...
How many Victoria Crosses were awarded for the Gallipoli
Campaign?
The first ANZAC area Victoria Cross did not go to an AN...
So what is a ‘Victoria Cross’?
The Victoria Cross was created by Queen Victoria in 1856 and made retrospective to 1854 to
...
Apart from the red poppies, what other plant can be worn on
ANZAC Day?
Rosemary.
Rosemary has been used as a symbol or Rem...
Who was the first lord of the Admiralty who planned the
disastrous Gallipoli Campaign?
Winston Churchill.
He later rose to...
Who was the war hero who became known as ‘The Man with the
Donkey’?
John Simpson or more correctly John Simpson Kirkpatric...
Simpson and his Donkey
David Smith White
(1st two stanzas)
On the beaches of Gallipoli,
in the Straits of the Dardanelles....
On the memorial at ANZAC Cove there is an inscription.
Who wrote these words?
Kemal Ataturk.
Those heroes that shed their ...
What is the Tomb of the unknown soldier?
‘The Unknown Soldier’ was recovered from Adelaide Cemetery near Villers-Bretonnea...
What was a Maurice Farman Shorthorn?
A plane flown by pilots of the Australian Flying Corps During World War One.
What was...
Did the Royal Australian Air Force take part in World War One?
No. The RAAF was not established till 1921. Uniforms they w...
Bibliography, Webography
& Resources
• ANZAC: Gallipoli: Bravery Awards
• Australian War Memorial: Atatürk (Mustafa Kemal)...
Assembled: A. Ballas
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The Battle of Gallipoli 1915-1916 - The Battle of Çanakkale 1915-1916

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A 'What do you know about ANZAC and the ANZACs?'
Looks briefly at the 'Why?' and the customs of the day.

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As it is to be shown to a class or a group of people; the presenter/speaker needs to prompt the answers manually for each question posed on the PowerPoint - this allows for discussion prior to answer being revealed.

Published in: Education
  • In the interest of precise historical accuracy, let me amend a previous comment: Henry (Harry) Normand MacLaurin was a Colonel when he led the First Infantry Brigade of the AIF and he was killed on the 27th of April 1915 not the 26th as I previously stated. He was 'mentioned in despatches' and became a Brigadier-General, (awarded posthumously) some time after that. David Smith-White, Sydney.
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  • Dear Yaryalitsa: Generally I post my work at a site called PoemHunter under the name David SmithWhite (from 2005-2009) http://www.poemhunter.com/david-smithwhite/poems/ or Dave SmithWhite (from 2010 to the present) http://www.poemhunter.com/dave-smithwhite/. Best Wishes from Sydney, David Smith-White.
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  • @David Smith-white - as to your connect - not ODD but overwhelming and fascinating. Have a great day
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  • @David Smith-white In this ‘fast-track’ world that we now reside in, many young people are scrapping through knowledge and are not enjoying ‘the learning’. As a Humanities/Language/Technology teacher I attempt in a PowerPoint to reach out to all areas of LEARNING and provided that ‘inkling’ to each student that hopefully will entice them to research/read further. Many of my students were quite overwhelmed the story of ‘Simpson and his Donkey’ and some had never come across the story even though the image was familiar. Again a pleasure and an honour.
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  • @David Smith-white I am honoured that you have commented on my PowerPoint. Unfortunately I have only the two first stanzas which I hope enticed the students to go and read further. How wonderful to have the poet respond – that is mind blowing.
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The Battle of Gallipoli 1915-1916 - The Battle of Çanakkale 1915-1916

  1. 1. The Battle of Gallipoli 1915-1916 The Battle of Çanakkale 1915-1916
  2. 2. The Battle of Gallipoli/The Battle of Çanakkale “which proved to be an allied fiasco and savage defeat in World War I nevertheless was pivotal in bringing the fledgling nation of Australia a sense of National Pride and Unity.” Both Australia and New Zealand commemorate this defeat as ANZAC Day each year on April 25. The Spirit of ANZAC The Spirit of ANZAC was suggested by official war historian C.E.W Bean to have: “stood, and still stands, for reckless valour in a good cause, for enterprise, resourcefulness, fidelity, comradeship and endurance that will never own defeat.” The Spirit was epitomised in the deeds of Simpson with his donkey at Gallipoli – comradeship, courage and sacrifice: others before self. It also encompasses the laughter, the pride and the love of life that is in every Australian.
  3. 3. The Six Great Powers before 1914 British Empire (Great Britain)- France - Russia (Empire) - Germany - Austria-Hungary - Ottoman Empire (Turkey) The Allied Powers (The Allies) Predominantly: British Empire (Great Britain), France, Russia and Italy The Central Powers Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Germany and the Ottoman Empire. The Gallipoli Campaign (Battle of Gallipoli) was one of the Allies great disasters of World War One. The Turks had joined the Central Powers in November 1914 and they were seen by Churchill as being the weak underbelly of those who fought against the Allies. “Churchill’s idea was simple. Creating another front would force the Germans to split their army still further as they would need to support the badly rated Turkish army. When the Germans went to assist the Turks, that would leave their lines weakened in the west or east and lead to greater mobility there as the Allies would have a weakened army to fight against.” His plan was to begin by gaining control of the Gallipoli Peninsula. By seizing the Peninsula the Allies would be able to control the 67 kilometre stretch of the Dardanelles waterway. This would then enable them to invade and occupy Constantinople in the hope that with the downfall of her capital, Turkey would soon follow.
  4. 4. What is the Turkish word for Gallipoli? Geilibolu. The original place called Gelibolu is a little fishing village, by the strait of The Dardanelles. By what name is the Battle of Gallipoli (Gallipoli Campaign) known in Turkey? The Battle of Çanakkale, commemorated because Turks successfully defended their homeland against a large invasion force. Where is Gallipoli? Gallipoli is a peninsula of land in western Turkey separating the Aegean Sea and the Dardanelles.
  5. 5. What does the acronym ANZAC stand for? Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The force was put together in Egypt where the men were being trained together. It largely comprised soldiers from: • The First Australian Imperial Forces and • The First New Zealand Expeditionary Force. It was apparently to be named the Australasian Army Force, but the New Zealanders objected to this seemingly biased name. In what year did the ANZACs first land at Gallipoli? 1915. 4.28am on Sunday 25th April, 1915 When did the ANZACs leave Gallipoli? 1915. Monday 20th December, 1915.
  6. 6. So what of Lone Pine? Much may have been forgotten about the ‘fame’ of Gallipoli but two locations are still well known: • ANZAC Cove the beach where most of the ANZACS landed on 25th of April, 1915; • LONE PINE where between the 6th and 9th of August 1915 there took place one of the most hard-fought actions in Australian military history – The Battle of Lone Pine. Seven Victoria Crosses were awarded to Australians for their courage at Lone Pine - five of them for actions on one day alone – the 9th of August 1915, an unprecedented event in Australian military history. Today six of those Victoria Crosses are on display in a Lone Pine exhibition in the Australian War Memorial’s Hall of Valour. North Beach ANZAC Panoramic Photo: H.J. Lowe and G. Downes
  7. 7. What other troops fought alongside the ANZACS at Gallipoli? What were the casualties? Apart from the New Zealanders and Australians, the Gallipoli landing force included large contingents from: • France and Britain, • And Indian regiment, • The Zion Mule Corps raised in Egypt and • Troops from Nepal and • Newfoundland, Canada. The casualties at Gallipoli were: • France 9,798 • Britain 21,255 • India 1,358 • Newfoundland 49 • Turkey 86,692.
  8. 8. What two (2) strange firearms were invented at Gallipoli? • The Periscope Rifle – to shoot from concealment in the trenches and • The Self-Firing Rifle. Both were set up to work automatically, so that there was a pretence that troops were still actively fighting when in fact they were being evacuated.
  9. 9. What nearby Greek Islands became the operations base for the ANZAC Offensive? The islands of: • Lemnos: 80 kms from Gallipoli and • Imbros: 24 kms from Gallipoli.
  10. 10. What significant Gallipoli Landmark was given a name associated with Egypt? The Sphinx. An outcrop on the Sari Bair range, which according to the Australian Government ANZAC website, was known to the Turks as Yusuk Tepe (High Hill).
  11. 11. How many Victoria Crosses were awarded for the Gallipoli Campaign? The first ANZAC area Victoria Cross did not go to an ANZAC. Lance-Corporal Walter Parker, Portsmouth Battalion, Royal Naval Division. He is not part of Australia’s ‘ANZAC Legend’ but his courage under fire between 30th April and 2nd May at ANZAC when, as a stretcher bearer, he looked after dozens of his wounded comrades despite his own wounds, earned him the Victoria Cross. • Lance Corporal Albert Jacka, 14th Battalion AIF. Victoria Cross for bravery at Lone Pine, Gallipoli, 6-9 August 1915: • Corporal Alexander Burton Dunstan, 7th Battalion • Corporal William Dunstan, 7th Battalion • Lieutenant Frederick Tubb, 7th Battalion • Lieutenant William Symons, 7th Battalion • Private John Hamilton, 3rd Battalion • Lance-Corporal Leonard Keysor, 1st Battalion • Captain Alfred Shout, 1st Battalion • Captain Hugo Throssell for his leadership and bravery at Hill 60, between 21st and 29th of August 1915. • Corporal Cyril Bassett, NZ Engineers Divisional Signals (the only New Zealander) Eleven in all – Ten without Lance-Corporal Walter Parker.
  12. 12. So what is a ‘Victoria Cross’? The Victoria Cross was created by Queen Victoria in 1856 and made retrospective to 1854 to include the Crimean War. The Victoria Cross was created in the wake of the carnage of the Crimean War to recognise gallantry in action by all ranks of the services. It is the highest British Commonwealth award for the most conspicuous bravery in the presence of the enemy. The first Australian to be awarded a Victoria Cross was Captain Sir Neville Howse, VC, KCMG, CB, KStJ, during the Boer War (1900). Australians have been awarded the Victoria Cross in the following conflicts: • 6 in the Boer War 1899–1902 • 64 in World War I 1914–1918 • 2 in North Russia 1919 • 20 in World War II 1939–1945 • 4 in Vietnam 1962–1972 • 4 in Afghanistan 2001–
  13. 13. Apart from the red poppies, what other plant can be worn on ANZAC Day? Rosemary. Rosemary has been used as a symbol or Remembrance since ancient days. It has particular significance for Australians because it grows wild at Gallipoli. In Australia, single poppies are not usually worn on ANZAC Day – the poppy belongs to Remembrance Day, 11 November 1918. However wreaths of poppies are traditionally placed at memorials and honour boards on ANZAC Day.
  14. 14. Who was the first lord of the Admiralty who planned the disastrous Gallipoli Campaign? Winston Churchill. He later rose to prominence in the Second World War as Prime Minister of Great Britain. Who was the much-loved Turkish war leader who later became the first president of the new Republic of Turkey? Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. He courageously led his troops to a bitter victory. (some 300,000 Turkish casualties.)
  15. 15. Who was the war hero who became known as ‘The Man with the Donkey’? John Simpson or more correctly John Simpson Kirkpatrick, an Englishman who enlisted in Australia and made many heroic rescues of the wounded using a donkey for transport before being killed by machine gun fire on 19th of May 1915. He used a number of donkeys, which he called by a variety of names: Murphy, Abdul - even Queen Elizabeth. But his favourite name was Duffy. Jack Simpson Kirkpatrick was born in 1892 at South Shields in the north east of England. He came from a large family, being one of eight children. He deserted ship in Australia when he heard of the war with Germany. Fearing that a deserter might not be accepted into the Australian Army, he dropped Kirkpatrick from his name and enlisted simply as John Simpson. He was to become Australia’s most famous, and best-loved military hero. According to Digger History. “In 1997, the RSPCA presented the Australian War Memorial with the Purple Cross awarded posthumously to Murphy (the donkey) for his services to humans while under constant fire at Gallipoli.”
  16. 16. Simpson and his Donkey David Smith White (1st two stanzas) On the beaches of Gallipoli, in the Straits of the Dardanelles. The cliffs hung like tattered scenery, on a circus carousel. The men rode their rocking ferries, to a dark and hostile shore; from the heights the fire was raking, 'cause that's the luck of war. A man walked with his donkey, across those alleys of fear. A man walked with his donkey, with his burden so dear. A man walked with his donkey, through the deadly leaden hail; a man walking with his donkey, surely would not fail. Simpson and his Donkey: Poem
  17. 17. On the memorial at ANZAC Cove there is an inscription. Who wrote these words? Kemal Ataturk. Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives… you are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore, rest in peace. These is no difference between the Johnnies, and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side, here in this country of ours. You, the mothers, who sent their sons from far away countries… Wipe away your tears. Your sons are now lying n our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land, they have become our sons as well. Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (Founder of Modern Turkey), 1934
  18. 18. What is the Tomb of the unknown soldier? ‘The Unknown Soldier’ was recovered from Adelaide Cemetery near Villers-Bretonneaux in France. His body was brought back to Australia and buried in the Hall of Remembrance at the Australian War Memorial on the 11th of November, 1993. He was interred in the Hall of Memory at the Australian War Memorial on Remembrance Day (not ANZAC day). This marked the 75th anniversary of the end of the First World War. He was killed in France in World War One. His remains were exhumed from a military cemetery in France. He was one of the 23,000 Australian soldiers killed in the war to have no known grave. Except for his nationality, they could not be identified and were buried beneath headstones bearing the words: “An Australian soldier of the Great War, known unto God.”
  19. 19. What was a Maurice Farman Shorthorn? A plane flown by pilots of the Australian Flying Corps During World War One. What was the AE2? The Australian submarine AE2 played a dramatic role in the Gallipoli Campaign penetrating the ‘Narrows’ and sinking an enemy cruiser. What is a ‘Waler’? A ‘Waler’ is a horse. Short for New South Walers, these sturdy stock horses were used by the Australian Light Horsemen in World War One. These horses could travel faster and farther than those favoured by other countries. They drank and ate less, rarely collapsed and recovered quickly. Around 160,000 of these horses were shipped overseas. What is ‘Bully Beef’? ‘Bully Beef’ is the name of a canned meat given to soldiers in the field. In World War One the ANZACs filled the empty can with nails, bits of metal and gunpowder to make ‘Bully Beef Bombs’. When is the Australian Flag flown at half mast? Flags are flown at half mast on ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day as a sign of mourning.
  20. 20. Did the Royal Australian Air Force take part in World War One? No. The RAAF was not established till 1921. Uniforms they wore were the AIF (Australian Imperial Force). What are the words of The ANZAC Ode and who wrote them? The Ode comes from For the Fallen, a poem by the English poet and writer Laurence Binyon and was published in London in the Winnowing Fan; Poems of the Great War in 1914. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; Age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning. We will remember them. Why were Australian soldiers called ‘Diggers’? The nickname ‘Digger’ is attributed to the number of ex- gold diggers in the early army units and to the trench digging activities of the Australian soldiers during World War One.
  21. 21. Bibliography, Webography & Resources • ANZAC: Gallipoli: Bravery Awards • Australian War Memorial: Atatürk (Mustafa Kemal) • Gallipoli and the ANZACs • Gallipoli Campaign Trivia • Not Only A Hero: The Donkey • Poem - Simpson and his Donkey • The Chronicles of our Generation: World War I: The Gallipoli Campaign • The Spirit of ANZAC Explained • The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier • Why did ANZACs land at Gallipoli?
  22. 22. Assembled: A. Ballas

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