New Media and New 
    Challenges 

            Sanjana Ha2otuwa 
  Senior Researcher, Centre for Policy Alterna>ves 
Context 
•  IGP believes mobiles can capture rape 
•  Mobile phones can host porn 
•  Protec>ng children from pornography ...
Four points
                                 
•  Ci>zen journalists need protec>on 

•  Mainstream media ethics needs to r...
Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists
                               
Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists
                                   
•  The dis>nc>on between new and old media will disapp...
Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists
                               
Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists
                                  

•  “According
to
the
views
of
a
democra3c
society
all
...
Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists
                                  

•  “…
ïn
saying
that
the
only
journalists
the
Minister...
Mainstream media ethics and UGC 
Mainstream media ethics and UGC: The

                 Island

•  June 13: My ar>cle was sent by email to groundviews.org ...
Mainstream media ethics and UGC: 
           The
Island 
1st July 2007

Dear Sir,

I wish to bring to your attention an ar...
Mainstream media ethics and UGC: 
           The
Island 
•  The
Island
of 5 July 2007 reproduced ar>cle in full with the 
...
Mainstream media ethics and UGC: 
           Lakbima  
•  “Perhaps
the
paper
think
I
ought
to
be
flaLered.
For
their
inform...
Mainstream media ethics and UGC: 
          Daily
Mirror
                      
•  Regularly republishes ar>cles from Grou...
Mainstream media ethics and UGC 
•  Ineffec>veness and lethargy of the Press Complaints Commission (PCC) as 
   it is curre...
Mainstream media ethics and UGC 
•  Need to formalise the interface between tradi>onal forms of 
   news and the flurry of ...
ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors
                                 
ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors
                                 
•  In Sri Lanka, telcos do not ques>on the Rajapakse r...
Limits of free speech online? 
ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors
                                 
•  En>re product lines have been discon>nued unofficiall...
ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors 
•  Bloggers and ci>zen journalists are hunted down, tortured and imprisoned 
   by repr...
ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors
                                 
•  FOE on the web and internet as important as FOE in ...
ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors
                                 
•  Companies will express support for human rights but...
ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors
                                 

•  Naming and shaming such ISPs and telcos that 
   e...
Rise of the nanny state. Or worse.
                                  
Rise of the nanny state. Or worse. 

•  Child pornography on mobiles and 
   pornography on the web. What is the 
   techn...
Slight technicali>es… 
Slight technicali>es… 
RSF and OSCE recommenda>ons
                             
1.  Any law about the flow of informa>on online must be 
    anch...
RSF and OSCE recommenda>ons
                              
3.  Any requirement to register
websites
with
governmental
auth...
RSF and OSCE recommenda>ons
                                
6.  The Internet combines various types of media, and new 
  ...
Thank you 
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

New Media and Colombo Declaration on Media Freedom

1,568 views

Published on

New Media and Colombo Declaration on Media Freedom

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,568
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
55
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

New Media and Colombo Declaration on Media Freedom

  1. 1. New Media and New  Challenges  Sanjana Ha2otuwa  Senior Researcher, Centre for Policy Alterna>ves 
  2. 2. Context  •  IGP believes mobiles can capture rape  •  Mobile phones can host porn  •  Protec>ng children from pornography on the web can be best  addressed by crea>ng paid accounts for parents  •  Mobile phone sharing prohibited  •  CDMA phones limited to fixed loca>ons  •  Environment can be saved by taxing mobile phone usage  •  No GPS in Sri Lanka  •  An Execu>ve that does not understand, use or has any  experience with new media 
  3. 3. Four points   •  Ci>zen journalists need protec>on  •  Mainstream media ethics needs to recognise User Generated  Content (USG) in the same manner as tradi>onal sources   •  ISPs are the new gatekeepers and censors  •  The rise of the Nanny State must be resisted 
  4. 4. Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists  
  5. 5. Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists   •  The dis>nc>on between new and old media will disappear  •  The prac>ce of journalism will con>nue to be dis>nct from  casual blogging  •  Ci>zens already bear witness to process and events  •  They will increasingly record,
transmit
and
talk
about
such  processes and events amongst themselves  •  They will be increasingly at risk  
  6. 6. Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists  
  7. 7. Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists   •  “According
to
the
views
of
a
democra3c
society
all
 those
in
print
and
electronic
media
as
well
as
those
 who
are
professionally
engaged
in
collec3ng
 informa3on
and
distribu3ng
it
to
the
public
are
 considered
journalists.
Even
those
who
maintain
 poli3cal
and
social
blogs
are
considered
journalists.”
 •  Statement by 5 media organisa>ons, 22 December  2007  http://ict4peace.wordpress.com/2007/12/22/key-media-organisations-and-trade-unions-in-sri-lanka-recognise-bloggers-as-journalists/
  8. 8. Protec>on of Ci>zen Journalists   •  “…
ïn
saying
that
the
only
journalists
the
Minister
 recognises
are
those
with
ID
cards
issued
by
the
 Media
Ministry,
the
Government
of
Sri
Lanka
 conveniently
ignores
the
vital
social
and
poli3cal
 critques
of
bloggers
in
Sri
Lanka.
From
Myanmar
to
 China
to
Iraq,
the
world
today
gets
news
and
 informa3on
through
bloggers.”
 •  Sunanda Deshapriya, Free Media Movement (FMM),  December 2007  http://www.vikalpa.org/archives/350
  9. 9. Mainstream media ethics and UGC 
  10. 10. Mainstream media ethics and UGC: The
 Island
 •  June 13: My ar>cle was sent by email to groundviews.org and to The  Island Newspaper.  •  June 13: Groundviews publishes my ar>cle in the original form.  •  June 16: The Island publishes my ar>cle in a form that is dras>cally  changed from the original.  •  June 16: I write by email complaining to the Editor of the Island and ask for  remedy.  •  June 19: I write by email to the Press Complaints Commission of Sri Lanka  and ask if they can entertain this sort of complaint.  •  June 30: No reply yet from the editor of the Island, nor the Press  Complaints Commission.  •  Full case study with all documenta>on at h2p://www.groundviews.org/ 2007/07/01/the‐pretense‐of‐professionalism‐the‐flipside‐of‐media‐ freedom‐in‐sri‐lanka/  
  11. 11. Mainstream media ethics and UGC:  The
Island  1st July 2007 Dear Sir, I wish to bring to your attention an article titled The pretense of professionalism - the flipside of media freedom in Sri Lanka (http://www.groundviews.org/2007/07/01/the- pretense-of-professionalism-the-flipside-of-media-freedom-in-sri-lanka/) regarding an article submitted by Nishan de Mel published in The Island on 16th June 2007. The facts of the case as they are presented in the article strongly suggest a gross and indefensible misuse of Editorial freedom. I would welcome your response that can be sent in via email to me or entered on the website directly. Best, Sanjana Hattotuwa
  12. 12. Mainstream media ethics and UGC:  The
Island  •  The
Island
of 5 July 2007 reproduced ar>cle in full with the  following note from the Editor:  


“An
edited
version
of
this
leLer
first
appeared
in
The
Island
 on
June
16.
The
original
leLer
is
published
in
full
today
as
 the
writer
has
taken
issue
with
us
over
the
changes
 effected
to
it
for
clarity
and
brevity.
However,
our
decision
 to
reproduce
it
has
nothing
to
do
with
the
complaint
he
has 
 made
to
the
Press
Complaints
Commission,
which
we
came
 to
know
only
at
the
eleventh
hour.
We
reproduce
it
on
our
 own
as
we
previously
made
the
mistake
of
edi3ng
and
 publishing
it
without
returning
it
to
the
sender.”

  13. 13. Mainstream media ethics and UGC:  Lakbima   •  “Perhaps
the
paper
think
I
ought
to
be
flaLered.
For
their
informa3on
(FTI),
I’m
not.
 Yet
oddly,
I’m
not
angry
about
this
(its
really
not
worth
the
3me
and
effort).
It
just
 doesn’t
feel
“right”.
Has
the
bad
smell
of
something
unethical.”
 •  Cerno, h2p://cerno.wordpress.com/2007/07/09/lakbima‐prints‐cernos‐post‐ without‐asking  •  “As
some
one
who
always
been
a
heavy
cri3cizer
of
Sanjana
and
Groundviews,
this
 is
a
point
where
I
whole
heartedly
ready
to
align
with
Sanjana.”
 •  A Voice in Colombo, h2p://www.groundviews.org/2007/07/12/rajpal‐abeynaike‐ editor‐of‐lakbima‐offers‐excep>onal‐responses‐to‐story‐on‐groundviews/ #comment‐1780  
  14. 14. Mainstream media ethics and UGC:  Daily
Mirror   •  Regularly republishes ar>cles from Groundviews  •  Arbitrary and exceedingly bad edits. En>re paragraphs are deleted,  paragraphs are shuffled around and mysteriously put into text boxes  •  Ar>cles truncated and published as Le2ers to the Editor  •  Repeatedly published with no a2ribu>on to Groundviews. Only once has  URL been given.
Renown authors have chosen publica>on on Groundviews
 over Daily Mirror  •  “I
am
pleased
that
Groundviews
provides
DM
with
material
for
publica3on
 and
perhaps,
inspira3on.
The
least
you
could
do
is
to
acknowledge
it.”

  15. 15. Mainstream media ethics and UGC  •  Ineffec>veness and lethargy of the Press Complaints Commission (PCC) as  it is currently cons>tuted. Uninterested in engaging bloggers, though  bloggers are deeply interested in dialogue  •  Mainstream media does not treat UGC in the same manner as other  sources. UGC is of lesser value – good enough for publica>on, but not for  a2ribu>on.  •  Editors do not understand new media or blogging, much less how to  a2ribute UGC content (URL? Trackback? Pseudonym? Blog name?)  •  The mainstream media's refusal to acknowledge its symbio>c rela>onship  with blogs is not only irresponsible, it's unethical.  
  16. 16. Mainstream media ethics and UGC  •  Need to formalise the interface between tradi>onal forms of  news and the flurry of growth in e‐news and e‐discussions on  current affairs   •  The media overlap that such development ins>gates, requires  debate towards establishing some type of consensus of the  interac>on  •  Common understanding and respect between tradi>onal  forms of media and the possibili>es UGC offers 
  17. 17. ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors  
  18. 18. ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors   •  In Sri Lanka, telcos do not ques>on the Rajapakse regime and  are supinely subservient to the MoD  •  Phones shut off to swathes of people without any warning  •  Phones are tapped   •  Emails are intercepted   •  VoIP (e.g. Skype) thro2led on some networks 
  19. 19. Limits of free speech online? 
  20. 20. ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors   •  En>re product lines have been discon>nued unofficially (Blackberry’s with  GPS and in‐dash naviga>on)  •  Some telcos say that content interroga>ng governance, war and peace  need to be approved by them and the MoD before they can be part of an  ini>a>ve that encourages ci>zens to create such content  •  Now disallowing teleconferencing!  •  Websites are blocked by all ISPs   •  There is no paper trail, no wri2en record of instruc>ons given to ISPs to  block, monitor and restrict access and communica>ons 
  21. 21. ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors  •  Bloggers and ci>zen journalists are hunted down, tortured and imprisoned  by repressive regimes  •  Undermine the work of media and Human Rights advocates  •  Help repressive regimes accurately target individuals and organisa>ons,  esp. NGOs  •  For greater market share and ROI, will turn a blind eye towards issues such  as human rights  •  May take a page from the UK, Australia or US 
  22. 22. ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors   •  FOE on the web and internet as important as FOE in electronic and print media  •  ISPs and telcos need to be accountable and open to their customers on how they  manage network traffic  •  ISPS must catalog and record efforts by governments to censor or monitor the  produc>on, dissemina>on or archival of informa>on  •  A well defined legal process for Government to ask for user informa>on from ISPs  •  Public Interest Li>ga>on that flags egregious cases of ISPs undermining human  rights  •  Crea>on of a watch dog, on the lines of Electronic Fron>er Founda>on (EFF)  
  23. 23. ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors   •  Companies will express support for human rights but also ask  the public to basically trust them to do the right thing  •  A fundamental problem is that companies will be very  resistant to the idea of independent monitoring, in par>cular  to a system that would allow for an independent third party  to assess:   1.  whether companies have put policies into place that demonstrate a  respect for freedom of expression and user privacy;   2.  that those polices are diligently implemented; and  3.  that their implementa>on is effec>ve in curtailing these human  rights problems. 
  24. 24. ISPs: New gatekeepers and censors   •  Naming and shaming such ISPs and telcos that  encourage policies and prac>ces inimical to  human rights, privacy and the freedom of  expression  •  Promising (and delivering!) the future today  may be hugely problema>c if we are heading  towards an Orwellian State 
  25. 25. Rise of the nanny state. Or worse.  
  26. 26. Rise of the nanny state. Or worse.  •  Child pornography on mobiles and  pornography on the web. What is the  technology used to block it?  •  Porn today. Democra>c dissent, human rights  concerns tomorrow?  •  Transparency needed. The Execu>ve’s  paternalism covers a mul>tude of sins. 
  27. 27. Slight technicali>es… 
  28. 28. Slight technicali>es… 
  29. 29. RSF and OSCE recommenda>ons   1.  Any law about the flow of informa>on online must be  anchored in the right
to
freedom
of
expression
as defined in  Ar>cle 19 of the Universal Declara>on of Human Rights.  2.  In
a
democra3c
and
open
society
it
is
up
to
the
ci3zens
to
 decide
what
they
wish
to
access
and
view
on
the
Internet.
 Filtering or ra>ng of online content by governments is  unacceptable. Filters should only be installed by Internet  users themselves. Any policy of filtering, be it at a na>onal or  local level, conflicts with the principle of free flow of  informa>on. 
  30. 30. RSF and OSCE recommenda>ons   3.  Any requirement to register
websites
with
governmental
authori9es
is
 not
acceptable.   4.  … A
decision
on
whether
a
website
is
legal
or
illegal
can
only
be
taken
 by
a
judge,
not
by
a
service
provider.
Such proceedings should guarantee  transparency, accountability and the right to appeal.  5.  All Internet
content
should
be
subject
to
the
legisla9on
of
the
country
 of
its
origin
(quot;upload rulequot;) and not to the legisla>on of the country  where it is downloaded. 
  31. 31. RSF and OSCE recommenda>ons   6.  The Internet combines various types of media, and new  publishing tools such as blogging are developing. Internet
 writers
and
online
journalists
should
be
legally
protected
 under
the
basic
principle
of
the
right
to
freedom
of
 expression
and
the
complementary
rights
of
privacy
and
 protec9on
of
sources.
 •  See h2p://www.rsf.org/ar>cle.php3?id_ar>cle=14136  
  32. 32. Thank you 

×