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  • XV. Knowledge Development Presentation Four A. Thinking Like a Trimix Diver IV Learning Objectives: By the end of this section, you should be able to answer these questions: 1. What are the limits of trimix diving? 2. What are the limits of your training in the Tec Trimix Diver course? 3. How do you extend your limits as a Tec Trimix Diver? 4. What are your responsibilities as a Tec Trimix Diver with respect to the state of the art in trimix diving in particular, and technical diving in general? 5. What is the most important personal quality with respect to extending your limits?
  • 1. The Limits of Trimix Diving a. To review what you learned in Knowledge Development Presentation One: Typical range for new, beginning trimix divers is to 75 metres/245 feet, or the maximum depth experienced during training. Experienced trimix divers venture as deep as 90 metres/300 feet. Dives between 90 metres/300 feet and 120 metres/400 feet are not unusual for highly experienced exploratory divers – beyond accepted range for beginning trimix divers As you know, the maximum depth for this course is 75 metres/245 feet. b. By its nature, tec diving pushes limits. The limits of trimix diving in general, trimix diving with open circuit scuba and trimix diving with closed circuit scuba are still being explored.
  • 2. Your Limits a. Your immediate limit for open water trimix diving after completing this course is 75 metres/245 feet or the maximum depth you reached in training (whichever is less) in conditions comparable to those in which you trained. these conditions include visibility, temperature, fresh or salt water, etc. also consider water motion – waves, surge and current consider anything that affects equipment configuration and/or procedures as new conditions
  • b. To extend your limits and the conditions in which you trimix dive, you need to give yourself time and experience. Make your first several dives after certification well within the limits of your training. As necessary and according to your risk tolerance and interest, extend your limits gradually by making dives progressively deeper or in more challenging conditions in small steps. Avoid pushing both environmental and depth limits together. Work deeper in environments and conditions that you know well and handle easily. When challenged by a new environment, master it on shallow dives first. Team up with more experienced divers. c. Your limits will expand over time if that’s your interest.
  • [!]3. Your Responsibilities as a Tec Trimix Diver a. It is your responsibility to accept the risks of trimix diving, tec diving and the mounting risks that accompany expanding your limits. b. It is your responsibility to stay informed with respect to the state of the art in tec diving in general, and trimix diving in particular. Technology and procedures continue to change based on experiences and accidents. Decompression theory continues to evolve with respect to decompression diving. Read periodicals, attend seminars, etc. to stay up to date.
  • c. It is your responsibility to temporarily or permanently quit tec diving if the risk becomes intolerable or your physical condition makes the risk unacceptable. d. It is your responsibility to keep your skills and knowledge fresh and current, and to refresh both after a period of inactivity before resuming.
  • 4. The most important personal quality you can have with respect to extending your limits and staying current for tec diving is patience . a. Don’t be in a hurry to push limits; gain experience slowly and carefully. b. It takes time to stay current; invest the time to do so and/or refresh and practice as necessary. c. Don’t let anyone talk you into a dive you’re not ready for. Saying “no” is not only the safe, smart thing to do, but will earn you respect and a reputation as a diver who knows and stays within personal limits.
  • B. Equipment III – Crush Depth Learning Objectives: By the end of this section, you should be able to answer these questions: 1. What is “crush depth” for a piece of equipment? 2. Why is crush depth an issue for trimix diving? 3. How do you determine a piece of equipment’s depth rating? 4. What is the safest course with respect to avoiding crush depth? 5. What risks do you face by exceeding equipment’s depth rating? 6. What other depth-related equipment issues might you encounter as a trimix diver? 7. What should you look for with respect to equipment rated to deep depths?
  • 1. As a trimix diver, you have to concern yourself with crush depth , which is the depth at which equipment can fail due to water pressure. a. primarily a concern for sealed, air filled equipment like dive lights, camera housings, strobes, watches, SPGs, electronic communications equipment may also be a concern with respect to anything made of a compressible material like Styrofoam or neoprene
  • 2. Crush depth is an issue for trimix diving because much dive equipment was designed for recreational diving to 40 metres/130 feet. a. Tec diving to 50 metres/165 feet is generally not an issue because this is within the design specs for most gear. b. As you go deeper, this becomes more of a concern, especially below 60 metres/200 feet.
  • 3. You normally determine the depth rating for equipment by consulting the manufacturer’s literature, or contacting the manufacturer. a. In some cases, it may be wise to test equipment by taking it to the desired depth, either to confirm manufacturer specs or because they’re not available. b. However, pressure stress can be cumulative – equipment may fail after several deep dives.
  • c. The lowest failure risk is to use equipment specifically designed for the desired depth.
  • 4. Diving to or beyond a piece of equipment’s rated depth (to crush depth) poses several possible risks. a. Catastrophic failure, in which the item implodes forcefully (hence the name “crush depth”) relatively rare, but possible some risk of injury with a large item sudden negative buoyancy can create a hazard, such as if clipped to a DPV that implodes b. Seal failure, cracking – water pressure causes seal to fail totally, water seeps in past the seals, or pressure cracks housing allowing water to seep in likely result with camera housings, strobes, DPVs and other devices with multiple intricate controls through the housing cracking more likely with lights and air filled gauges unit floods, with internal damage (depends on the device) and buoyancy loss c. Non catastrophic crush – pressure distorts the equipment affecting it internally SPG is a common example – gauge face bends in and presses on mechanism so it can’t move housings/electronics – water pressure depresses and/or freezes controls electronics – water pressure squeezes circuit boards together causing short circuits and failure lights – may crush batteries internally equipment held by snug fit with neoprene or Styrofoam may come loose due to material compression
  • 5. Other depth-related effects a. Most electronic gauges/computers have depth limits – commonly 100 metres/330 feet for air/EANx computers (or less for some models, and deeper for trimix models) consult manufacturer literature failure to stay within your gauge’s range can leave you without depth/time information if instrument enters error or out-of-range mode some air/EANx computers function as computers to 100 metres/330 feet, but can be set for gauge-only function to much deeper depths b. BCD/dry suit inflation As you go deeper, increased gas density slows speed at which your BCD and/or dry suit inflate. Noticeable as shallow as 30 metres/100 feet, but becomes very noticeable as you approach 60 metres/200 feet. Make a habit of inflating often to maintain buoyancy. Avoid long, drawn out bursts that can cause regulator freeze, especially in cold water. Some divers prefer high volume inflation system to help counter this. c. Wet suits Will insulate far less effectively at extreme depth due to neoprene compression. Some types of neoprene crush permanently when taken to trimix depths, resulting in permanent insulation and buoyancy loss.
  • d. Regulators Some regulators, especially less costly, lower performance models, may have noticeable delivery problems at trimix depths. This is why high performance regulators are the best choice for trimix (reliable, lower end regulators may be fine for shallow use on decompression cylinders). e. Decompression model Some anecdotal reports suggest that current deco modeling methodologies become less reliable below 100 metres/330 feet. Anecdotal reports suggest higher DCS incidence rate and the need for more conservatism at these depths. This is largely theoretical and a question of what’s not known more than what is known.
  • 6. Choosing depth rated equipment a. Check the manufacturer rating and select equipment that’s rated deeper than your intended use depth (if possible). b. Liquid filled gauges resist pressure far better than air-filled (but they cost more).
  • c. Multigas trimix computers are generally rated much deeper than other computers. Be sure your backup depth and time instruments are rated to the same depths, though. d. Large items like light canisters and DPVs tolerate pressure far better with internal bulkheads. e. Pay close attention to camera housing depth ratings. Relatively few have ratings deeper than 75 metres/245 feet, they tend to leak easily if taken too deep, and the consequences can be very expensive.
  • XVI. Practical Application Four Practical Application Four has the primary purpose of turning dive planning over to students (in teams) almost entirely, with you/staff available to provide assistance. To successfully complete this Practical Application, the student will be able to: 1. Working as a team and using desktop deco software, plan two trimix dives, both with deep stops. The plans must include gas consumption, oxygen exposure, decompression schedules, turn pressures and contingency decompression schedules for each team member. 2. Working as a team, plan a team-chosen mission studying pressure effects on an object, to be accomplished within the second of the two dives, accounting for time required, specific tasks, individual team member duties and the effects on general dive planning. The mission must be integrated into the effect, time and logistics of the over all dive plan. A. Dive Planning 1. Divide students into teams . Ideally, these should be the teams that will dive together in Training Dives Five and Six, so teams of two, or three with a certified assistant, are recommended. 2. Assign students two dives to plan. They are to entirely plan the dives, within the following limits and restrictions that you provide: a. These dives may be the actual dive plans and schedules teams use for Training Dives Five and Six. b. The depth range for the dives is 45 metres/150 feet to 67 metres/220 feet. You may specify a narrow range within this range if necessary for logistical/environmental purposes. You may specify time ranges for logistical purposes as well. c. The bottom trimix must have 16 percent or higher oxygen. You may specify a range, but there should be choices. d. The dives may have two to four deco gases. You may specify a range of gases, but there should be choices. You may also limit the deco gases to two or three if necessary for logistical/environmental reasons and these will be the plans for the actual dives. e. Both dive plans must include deep stops . If the software doesn’t generate them, then student divers enter them manually as waypoints. gas supply requirements for each diver based on personal SAC rates. bottom time and decompression schedule with runtime turn pressures contingency (bail out) decompression schedules oxygen exposure (OTUs and “CNS clock”) 3. Assign teams missions to plan for completion during Training Dives Five and Six. a. Each team develops and plans its own mission (with your approval) for Dive Five. Allow anything that the team wants to accomplish provided it doesn’t violate the dive limits or create an undue hazard. The purpose is to allow teams to learn to gauge what they want to accomplish and what they can accomplish. Note that teams must also allow time for the required dive skills (See Dive Five details) within the planned bottom time. b. The way to accomplish the mission for Dive Six is to be created and chosen by each team, but must involve measurably documenting pressure-related effects on one or more object. The team should plan to provide specific measurements, photos, etc. of the object(s) before, during and after the dive. You may provide suggestions based on the environment and local variables. The purpose is to allow teams to adapt to a mission they didn’t choose, but must create the methodology. Note: The mission must document the pressure in a way that’s visible to someone who didn’t make the dive. c. Remind student divers that completing the mission is not the priority; completing the dive safely as planned is the priority. Emphasis should be that the mission is important (or why make the dive), but that safety is the priority. Students should remember that the point of practicing missions is so that their trimix dives will have a useful purpose. d. Teams should present their plans to you and include these elements: estimated time requirements individual roles predive preparation for the mission effect on general dive planning (gas selection, etc.) mission (goal and method for Dive Five, and how the pressure effect will be measured and documented for Dive Six). d. The plan should show how the mission will be accomplished within the dive plan for Training Dive Eight. If you are having students plan example dives well ahead of the actual training dives, have teams replan mission integration when they plan the actual Training Dive Eight. e. Provide comments, suggestions and/or changes to both dive plans as appropriate.
  • XIX. Practical Application Five Practical Application Five has the primary purpose of turning dive planning over to students (in teams) almost entirely, with you/staff available to provide assistance. To successfully complete this Practical Application, the student will be able to: 1. Working as a team and using desktop deco software, plan two trimix dives, both with deep stops. The plans must include gas consumption, oxygen exposure, decompression schedules, turn pressures and contingency decompression schedules for each team member. 2. Working as a team, plan a team-chosen mission for each dive. A. Dive Planning 1. Divide students into teams . Ideally, these should be the teams that will dive together in Training Dives Seven and Eight. 2. Assign students two dives to plan. They are to entirely plan the dives, within the following limits and restrictions that you provide: a. These dives may be the actual dive plans and schedules teams use for Training Dives Seven and Eight. b. The depth range for the dives is 55 metres/180 feet to 75 metres/245 feet. You may specify a narrow range within this range if necessary for logistical/environmental purposes. You may specify time ranges for logistical purposes as well. c. The bottom trimix may be any suitable blend with an END of 40 metres/130 feet or shallower. You may specify a range, but there should be choices. d. The dives may have two to four deco gases. You may specify a range of gases, but there should be choices. You may have them generate plans with more deco gases and/or different deco gases than they’ll actually use on Training Dives Seven and/or Eight, then regenerate the plans with the actual gases they’ll use for comparison. e. Both dive plans must include deep stops . If the software doesn’t generate them, then students enter them manually as waypoints. gas supply requirements for each diver based on personal SAC rates. bottom time and decompression schedule with runtime turn pressures contingency (bail out) decompression schedules oxygen exposure (OTUs and “CNS clock”) 3. Assign teams to plan missions to complete during Training Dives Seven and Eight. a. These dives are the final and deepest dives of the course. The emphasis should be on executing well planned dives according to the plan, so encourage reasonable missions. The missions may be subtasks for an overall mission completed over both dives and/or by multiple teams. Be ready to suggest a mission or missions if teams cannot (may be an issue due to relative unfamiliarity with the dive site). b. Remind student divers that completing the mission is not the priority; completing the dive safely as planned is the priority. c. Team should present their plans to you verbally or in writing and include these elements: estimated time requirements individual roles predive preparation for the mission effect on general dive planning (gas selection, etc.) d. Provide comments, suggestions and/or changes to both dive plans as appropriate.
  • B. Tec Trimix Diver Exam Administer the Tec Trimix Diver Exam. After completing the exam, review questions missed with students individually. Eighty percent is the minimum score without retaking the exam; however, students must demonstrate mastery on all items missed.
  • XVII. Training Dive Five To successfully complete this training dive, the student will be able to: 1. Working within the student’s assigned team, rig gear, including stage/deco cylinders, and plan the dive following the A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live procedure, and perform predive checks following the Being Wary Reduces All Failures procedures. 2. Working in a team, plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive using a table and/or multigas computer and using air, enriched air, low helium/high oxygen trimix and/or oxygen for decompression gases. 3.On the bottom, respond correctly to a simulated regulator freeflow or manifold failure. 4.On the bottom, respond correctly to a simulated runaway inflator (primary BCD or backup inflation system). 5. Working as a team, reasonably attempt to accomplish a mission they’ve chosen together. 6. As a team, deploy a lift bag from the bottom. 7. As a team, send a second lift bag up the line of the previously deployed lift bag. 8. While decompressing, respond to an ascent emergency scenario presented by the instructor by writing the correction action, including any modified stop times, on a slate. 9. Demonstrate time, depth and gas supply awareness by recording depth, SPG pressure and time at intervals set before the dive by the instructor. Training Dive Five allows students to practice previously mastered emergency skills assigned while at depth. A. Training Dive Five Standards 1. Training Dive Five is conducted in open water as a trimix decompression dive. The minimum depth is 45 metres/150 feet and the maximum depth is 67 metres/220 feet. 2. Ratios – 2 students to 1 instructor, with 1 more student permitted with a certified assistant to a maximum of 3 . (See Section Two for specific requirements necessary to qualify as a certified assistant in this course.) These are maximums – reduce ratios as necessary to accommodate student diver characteristics and environmental/logistical considerations. 3. Students and instructor must be equipped as described in the Tec Deep Diver course, with accommodation for environmental needs. This includes but is not limited to: a. Manifolded double cylinders with dual, independent regulator posts. b. Technical diving BCD, redundant buoyancy device (double bladder BCD, or dry suit if appropriate for weight of gear worn) and harness as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. c. Two or three stage/decompression cylinders configured as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. 4. Gas requirements. Students and staff may use air, enriched air, oxygen, low helium/high oxygen trimix for decompression. These may be any appropriate blends such as air, EANx 32, 36, 50, 80, TMx32/10, TMx50/10, etc. Back gas should be a trimix with 21 to 16 percent oxygen and with sufficient helium for an END equal to or less than 40 metres/130 feet at the planned depth. It is recommended that you have students simulate starting the dive using one of the deco gases as a travel gas, figuring the gas consumption into their dive plans. 5. The decompression schedule should include deep stops, either generated by desktop deco software automatically or determined manually and inserted as waypoints. B. Predive Planning, Briefing and Preparation – suggested sequence 1. Predive briefing a. Group in teams, students set up their rigs, analyze gases, but do not yet don exposure suits. Encourage teamwork. Inspect each rig for correct setup, ample gas supply, etc. Pay particular attention to proper cylinder markings written and placed so team can read them while worn. b. Dive site overview Depth, temperature, entry/exit points, noteworthy features. Facilities – parking, lockers, boat dry and wet areas, where to find emergency equipment, etc. c. Dive overview Depth/time limits It’s recommended that you have students write down the dive overview and notes on a slate for reference during the dive, and to have them do this for each dive. Skill overview – describe each skill, the performance requirement and how you’ll conduct it, including signals, etc. appropriate entry, don stage/deco cylinders (at surface or before entering water) students use travel or appropriate deco gas at surface bubble check descent NO TOX switch to back gas at planned depth ; descent check freeflow regulator/failed manifold drill runaway inflator drill mission team deploys lift bag team deploys second lift bag along first bag’s line follow trimix deco schedule with NO TOX gas switches emergency decompression procedures Time, depth and gas supply awareness – assigned by instructor. May be depths, times, pressures, turn pressures, etc. Goal is to get divers to constantly monitor time, depth and gases. Instructor will not remind divers to do this. Teammates are encouraged to assist each other with this. Students must do this no matter what else is going on, short of a real emergency. Review hand signals, emergency protocols, descent and ascent procedures, final details. Assign each team to complete individual dive plans. Remind divers they are carrying gases that they cannot safely breathe at the bottom depth. d. Teams plan dives and gear up Teams go through A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live and plan dive. Have them plan based on a decompression schedule they generate from a depth, trimix and deco gases. They should generate an entire plan with deco schedule, contingency schedule, gas volume requirements, turn pressures and oxygen exposure for each diver. You may have them do this by hand or use desktop deco software. Practical Application Four may be this planning session. Allow ample time for proper planning, which may take an hour or more. The final plans should include gas volume requirements for all divers and may be presented on the TecRec Dive Planning Slate or on a computer printout. It’s also recommended that you have students laminate copies of their tables to carry on the dive. Teams gear up and finish their checks with Being Wary Reduces All Failures. Students use TecRec Equipment Checklist to confirm each other’s equipment setup. Touch drill while geared up and seated, student divers reach back and touch (grasp) regulator and isolator valves as if to close/open them. Teammates adjust equipment/assist each other as necessary. C. Training Dive Five – suggested sequence 1. Entry – appropriate for environment, deep water entry recommended. a. Divers check their weight if necessary due to environment or gear change. b. Divers don stage/deco cylinders at surface with minimal assistance, or prior to entering water (as appropriate for environment and logistics). c. Divers bubble check teammates. It’s a good idea to have spare o-rings at hand. d. Divers use appropriate deco gas as simulated travel gas at surface. Teammates confirm correct gas use. 2. Descent a. Descend and stop at planned depth for switch to back gas. b. Student divers NO TOX switch to back gas. c. Descent check . d. Stage cylinders at deco levels (if appropriate to environment). e. Continue descent to mission area. 3. Dive skills a. Freeflow regulator or manifold failure Signal to students that either back gas second stage is freeflowing or the manifold has failed. Do not simulate the freeflow by holding in the purge button because this is an actual decompression dive and doing so wastes reserve gas. Use a slate or signal. Diver shuts appropriate valve and switches second stage if appropriate. Confirm valve reopened and breathing from primary second stage after finishing exercise. b. Runaway inflator drill Signal that the diver’s primary or secondary inflator is leaking. Diver disconnects leaking inflator and switches to secondary (backup) buoyancy system. Confirm inflator hose reconnected and operational after concluding exercise. c. Mission – as time allows. Allow ample time for lift bag deployment within planned bottom time. d. Deploy lift bag. e. Failed bag drill – send second bag up first bag’s line. f. Ascent and decompression with NO TOX gas switches Team may ascend and drift under lift bag, ascend another line (anchor or mooring) towing bag, or having bag retrieved by staff at the surface, as appropriate. During decompression, you present emergencies based on those listed on the TecRec Emergency Procedures slate. Example: Write “You’ve just returned to this stop after accidentally ascending to the surface and returning after six minutes with no DCS symptoms. What would you do?” Student responds by writing out the correct action, including stop times on a slate. Emphasize that students will not actually follow the emergency schedule. This is because doing so would consume the students’ reserves, which should be conserved in case a real emergency should arise. Student divers may consult the TecRec Emergency Procedures Slate. Present these problems at depths with more than one or two minutes stop so students can answer without accidentally compromising their deco schedule. 4. Exit water (as appropriate for environment). D. Post Dive 1. Performance review. After giving divers some time to rest, get a drink, etc., but while memories remain fresh, have teams identify what happened, what they learned, what worked and what didn’t, etc. Comment and fill in missing information as necessary, but have students critique themselves constructively while you guide the process. 2. Have divers show you their slates with the recorded times/depths/SPG readings assigned prior to the dive. 3. Debrief divers on their skills and emergencies. 4. Divers disassemble and stow their gear as appropriate. 5. Students log dive for your signature.
  • XVIII. Training Dive Six To successfully complete this training dive, the student will be able to: 1. Working within the student’s assigned team, rig gear, including stage/deco cylinders, and plan the dive following the A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live procedure, and perform predive checks following the Being Wary Reduces All Failures procedures. 2. Working in a team, plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive using a table and/or multigas computer and using air, enriched air, low helium/high oxygen trimix and/or oxygen for decompression gases. 3. As a team within the dive plan limits, execute a mission to study and document in a measurable method the effects of pressure on one or more objects. 4. While decompressing, respond to an ascent emergency scenario presented by the instructor by writing the correction action, including any modified stop times, on a slate. 5. Demonstrate time, depth and gas supply awareness by recording depth, SPG pressure and time at intervals set before the dive by the instructor. Training Dive Six allows students to put into practice a dive plan integrated with a mission that they’ve developed as a team, with you and/or instructional staff providing primarily only guidance. A. Training Dive Six Standards 1. Training Dive Six is conducted in open water as a trimix decompression dive. The minimum depth is 45 metres/150 feet and the maximum depth is 67 metres/220 feet. 2. Ratios – 2 students to 1 instructor, with 1 more student permitted with a certified assistant to a maximum of 3 . (See Section Two for specific requirements necessary to qualify as a certified assistant in this course.) These are maximums – reduce ratios as necessary to accommodate student characteristics and environmental/logistical considerations. 3. Students and instructor must be equipped as described in the Tec Deep Diver course, with accommodation for environmental needs. This includes but is not limited to: a. Manifolded double cylinders with dual, independent regulator posts. b. Technical diving BCD, redundant buoyancy device (double bladder BCD, or dry suit if appropriate for weight of gear worn) and harness as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. c. Two or three stage/decompression cylinders configured as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. 4. Gas requirements. Students and staff may use air, enriched air, oxygen, low helium/high oxygen trimix for decompression. These may be any appropriate blends such as air, EANx 32, 36, 50, 80, TMx32/10, TMx50/10, etc. Back gas should be a trimix with at least 16 percent oxygen and with sufficient helium for an END equal to or less than 40 metres/130 feet at the planned depth. 5. The decompression schedule should include deep stops, either generated by desktop deco software automatically or determined manually and inserted as waypoints. B. Predive Planning, Briefing and Preparation – suggested sequence 1. Predive briefing a. Group in teams, students set up their rigs, analyze gases, but do not yet don exposure suits. Encourage teamwork. Inspect each rig for correct setup, ample gas supply, etc. Pay particular attention to proper cylinder markings written and placed so team can read them while worn. b. Dive site overview Depth, temperature, entry/exit points, noteworthy features. Facilities – parking, lockers, boat dry and wet areas, where to find emergency equipment, etc. c. Dive overview Depth/time limits It’s recommended that you have student divers write down the dive overview and notes on a slate for reference during the dive, and to have them do this for each dive. Skill overview – describe each skill, the performance requirement and how you’ll conduct it, including signals, etc. appropriate entry, don stage/deco cylinders (at surface or before entering water) bubble check descent descent check pressure effects mission free time to explore (time allowing) emergency decompression procedures Time, depth and gas supply awareness – assigned by instructor. May be depths, times, pressures, turn pressures, etc. Goal is to get divers to constantly monitor time, depth and gases. Instructor will not remind divers to do this. Teammates are encouraged to assist each other with this. Students must do this no matter what else is going on, short of a real emergency. Review hand signals, emergency protocols, descent and ascent procedures, final details. Assign each team to complete individual dive plans. Remind divers they are carrying gases that they cannot safely breathe at the bottom depth. d. Teams plan dives and gear up Teams go through A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live and plan dive. Have them plan based on a decompression schedule they generate from a depth, trimix and deco gases. They should generate an entire plan with deco schedule, contingency schedule, gas volume requirements, turn pressures and oxygen exposure for each diver. You may have them do this by hand or use desktop deco software. Practical Application Four may be this planning session. Allow ample time for proper planning, which may take an hour or more. The final plans should include gas volume requirements for all divers and may be presented on the TecRec Dive Planning Slate or on a computer printout. It’s also recommended that you have students laminate copies of their tables to carry on the dive. Teams gear up and finish their checks with Being Wary Reduces All Failures. Students use TecRec Equipment Checklist to confirm each other’s equipment setup. Touch drill while geared up and seated, students reach back and touch (grasp) regulator and isolator valves as if to close/open them. Teammates adjust equipment/assist each other as necessary. C. Training Dive Six – suggested sequence 1. Entry – appropriate for environment, deep water entry recommended. a. Divers check their weight if necessary due to environment or gear change. b. Divers don stage/deco cylinders at surface with minimal assistance, or prior to entering water (as appropriate for environment and logistics). c. Divers bubble check teammates. It’s a good idea to have spare o-rings at hand. 2. Descent a. Descent check . b. Stage cylinders at deco levels (if appropriate to environment). c. Continue descent to mission area. 3. Dive skills a. Pressure effects mission. b. Free time to explore – as time allows. c. Ascent and decompression with NO TOX gas switches. Team may ascend and drift under a lift bag, or other ascent reference and technique as appropriate to the environment. During decompression, you present emergencies based on those listed on the TecRec Emergency Procedures slate. Example: Write “You’ve just returned to this stop after accidentally ascending to the surface and returning after six minutes with no DCS symptoms. What would you do?” Present a different problem from the one you gave each team in Training Dive Five. Student responds by writing out the correct action, including stop times on a slate. Emphasize that student divers will not actually follow the emergency schedule. This is because doing so would consume the students’ reserve, which should be conserved in case a real emergency should arise. Students may consult the TecRec Emergency Procedures Slate. Present these problems at depths with more than one or two minutes stop so students can answer without accidentally compromising their deco schedule. 4. Exit water (as appropriate for environment). D. Post Dive 1. Performance review. 2. Have divers show you their slates with the recorded times/depths/SPG readings assigned prior to the dive. 3. Debrief divers on the mission and skills practiced. 4. Divers disassemble and stow their gear as appropriate. 5. Student divers log dive for your signature.
  • XX. Training Dive Seven To successfully complete this training dive, the student will be able to: 1. Working within the student’s assigned team, rig gear, including stage/deco cylinders, and plan the dive following the A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live procedure, and perform predive checks following the Being Wary Reduces All Failures procedures. 2. Working in a team, plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive using a table and/or multigas computer and using air, enriched air, low helium/high oxygen trimix and/or oxygen for decompression gases. 3. As a team and within the dive plan limits, execute a mission chosen by the team. Training Dive Seven allows students to put into practice basic dive plans and missions that they develop with your/staff guidance only. Given this and the final dives are the deepest dives in the course, the emphasis is on executing the dive as planned. A. Training Dive Seven Standards 1. Training Dive Seven is conducted in open water as a trimix decompression dive. The minimum depth is 55 metres/180 feet and the maximum depth is 75 metres/245 feet. 2. Ratios – 2 students to 1 instructor, with 1 more student permitted with a certified assistant to a maximum of 3 . (See Section Two for specific requirements necessary to qualify as a certified assistant in this course.) These are maximums – reduce ratios as necessary to accommodate student characteristics and environmental/logistical considerations. 3. Students and instructor must be equipped as described in the Tec Deep Diver course, with accommodation for environmental needs. This includes but is not limited to: a. Manifolded double cylinders with dual, independent regulator posts. b. Technical diving BCD, redundant buoyancy device (double bladder BCD, or dry suit if appropriate for weight of gear worn) and harness as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. c. Stage/decompression cylinders as required configured as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. 4. Gas requirements. Students and staff may use air, enriched air, oxygen, low helium/high oxygen trimix for decompression. These may be any appropriate blends such as air, EANx 32, 36, 50, 80, TMx32/10, TMx50/10, etc. Back gas should be a trimix with sufficient helium for an END equal to or less than 40 metres/130 feet at the planned depth, and 16 to 21 percent oxygen. 5. The decompression schedule should include deep stops, either generated by desktop deco software automatically or determined manually and inserted as waypoints. B. Predive Planning, Briefing and Preparation – suggested sequence 1. Predive briefing a. Group in teams, student divers set up their rigs, analyze gases, but do not yet don exposure suits. Encourage teamwork. Inspect each rig for correct setup, ample gas supply, etc. Pay particular attention to proper cylinder markings written and placed so team can read them while worn. b. Dive site overview Depth, temperature, entry/exit points, noteworthy features. Facilities – parking, lockers, boat dry and wet areas, where to find emergency equipment, etc. c. Dive overview Depth/time limits It’s recommended that you have students write down the dive overview and notes on a slate for reference during the dive, and to have them do this for each dive. Skill overview – describe each skill, the performance requirement and how you’ll conduct it, including signals, etc. appropriate entry, don stage/deco cylinders (at surface or before entering water) bubble check descent descent check mission Review hand signals, emergency protocols, descent and ascent procedures, final details. Assign each team to complete individual dive plans. Remind divers they are carrying gases that they cannot safely breathe at the bottom depth. d. Teams plan dives and gear up Teams go through A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live and plan dive. Have them plan based on a decompression schedule they generate from a depth, trimix and deco gases. They should generate an entire plan with deco schedule, contingency schedule, gas volume requirements, turn pressures and oxygen exposure for each diver. You may have them do this by hand or use desktop deco software. Practical Application Five may be this planning session. Allow ample time for proper planning, which may take an hour or more. The final plans should include gas volume requirements for all divers and may be presented on the TecRec Dive Planning Slate or on a computer printout. It’s also recommended that you have student divers laminate copies of their tables to carry on the dive. Teams gear up and finish their checks with Being Wary Reduces All Failures. Students use TecRec Equipment Checklist to confirm each other’s equipment setup. Touch drill while geared up and seated, student divers reach back and touch (grasp) regulator and isolator valves as if to close/open them. Teammates adjust equipment/assist each other as necessary. C. Training Dive Seven – suggested sequence 1. Entry – appropriate for environment, deep water entry recommended. a. Divers check their weight if necessary due to environment or gear change. b. Divers don stage/deco cylinders at surface with minimal assistance, or prior to entering water (as appropriate for environment and logistics). c. Divers bubble check teammates. It’s a good idea to have spare o-rings at hand. 2. Descent a. Descent check . b. Stage cylinders at deco levels (if appropriate to environment). c. Continue descent to mission area. 3. Dive skills a. Mission b. Ascent and decompression with NO TOX gas switches Team may ascend and drift under a lift bag, or other ascent reference and technique as appropriate to the environment. 4. Exit water (as appropriate for environment). D. Post Dive 1. Performance review. 2. Debrief divers on the mission and skills practiced. 3. Divers disassemble and stow their gear as appropriate. 4. Student divers log dive for your signature.
  • XXI. Training Dive Eight To successfully complete this training dive, the student will be able to: 1. Working within the student’s assigned team, rig gear, including stage/deco cylinders, and plan the dive following the A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live procedure, and perform predive checks following the Being Wary Reduces All Failures procedures. 2. Working in a team, plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive using a table and/or multigas computer and using air, enriched air, low helium/high oxygen trimix and/or oxygen for decompression gases. 3. As a team and within the dive plan limits, execute a mission chosen by the team. Training Dive Eight allows students to put into practice basic dive plans and missions that they develop with your/staff guidance only. As the final dives are the deepest dives in the course, the emphasis is on executing the dive as planned. A. Training Dive Eight Standards 1. Training Dive Eight is conducted in open water as a trimix decompression dive. The minimum depth is 55 metres/180 feet and the maximum depth is 75 metres/245 feet. 2. Ratios – 2 students to 1 instructor, with 1 more student permitted with a certified assistant to a maximum of 3 . (See Section Two for specific requirements necessary to qualify as a certified assistant in this course.) These are maximums – reduce ratios as necessary to accommodate student diver characteristics and environmental/logistical considerations. 3. Students and instructor must be equipped as described in the Tec Deep Diver course, with accommodation for environmental needs. This includes but is not limited to: a. Manifolded double cylinders with dual, independent regulator posts. b. Technical diving BCD, redundant buoyancy device (double bladder BCD, or dry suit if appropriate for weight of gear worn) and harness as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. c. Stage/decompression cylinders as required configured as described in the equipment requirement section, and following the rigging philosophies described in the Tec Deep Diver course. 4. Gas requirements. Students and staff may use air, enriched air, oxygen, low helium/high oxygen trimix for decompression. These may be any appropriate blends such as air, EANx 32, 36, 50, 80, TMx32/10, TMx50/10, etc. Back gas should be a trimix with sufficient helium for an END equal to or less than 40 metres/130 feet at the planned depth, and 21 to 16 percent oxygen. 5. The decompression schedule should include deep stops, either generated by desktop deco software automatically or determined manually and inserted as waypoints. B. Predive Planning, Briefing and Preparation – suggested sequence 1. Predive briefing a. Group in teams, students set up their rigs, analyze gases, but do not yet don exposure suits. Encourage teamwork. Inspect each rig for correct setup, ample gas supply, etc. Pay particular attention to proper cylinder markings written and placed so team can read them while worn. b. Dive site overview Depth, temperature, entry/exit points, noteworthy features. Facilities – parking, lockers, boat dry and wet areas, where to find emergency equipment, etc. c. Dive overview Depth/time limits It’s recommended that you have students write down the dive overview and notes on a slate for reference during the dive, and to have them do this for each dive. Skill overview – describe each skill, the performance requirement and how you’ll conduct it, including signals, etc. appropriate entry, don stage/deco cylinders (at surface or before entering water) bubble check descent descent check mission Review hand signals, emergency protocols, descent and ascent procedures, final details. Assign each team to complete individual dive plans. Remind divers they are carrying gases that they cannot safely breathe at the bottom depth. d. Teams plan dives and gear up Teams go through A Good Diver’s Main Objective Is To Live and plan dive. Have them plan based on a decompression schedule they generate from a depth, trimix and deco gases. They should generate an entire plan with deco schedule, contingency schedule, gas volume requirements, turn pressures and oxygen exposure for each diver. You may have them do this by hand or use desktop deco software. Practical Application Five may be this planning session. Allow ample time for proper planning, which may take an hour or more. The final plans should include gas volume requirements for all divers and may be presented on the TecRec Dive Planning Slate or on a computer printout. It’s also recommended that you have students laminate copies of their tables to carry on the dive. Teams gear up and finish their checks with Being Wary Reduces All Failures. Student divers use TecRec Equipment Checklist to confirm each other’s equipment setup. Touch drill while geared up and seated, students reach back and touch (grasp) regulator and isolator valves as if to close/open them. Teammates adjust equipment/assist each other as necessary. C. Training Dive Eight – suggested sequence 1. Entry – appropriate for environment, deep water entry recommended. a. Divers check their weight if necessary due to environment or gear change. b. Divers don stage/deco cylinders at surface with minimal assistance, or prior to entering water (as appropriate for environment and logistics). c. Divers bubble check teammates. It’s a good idea to have spare o-rings at hand. 2. Descent a. Descent check . b. Stage cylinders at deco levels (if appropriate to environment). c. Continue descent to mission area. 3. Dive skills a. Mission b. Ascent and decompression with NO TOX gas switches Team may ascend and drift under a lift bag, or other ascent reference and technique as appropriate to the environment. 4. Exit water (as appropriate for environment). D. Post Dive 1. Performance review. 2. Debrief divers on the mission and skills practiced. 3. Divers disassemble and stow their gear as appropriate. 4. Students log dive for your signature.
  • E. Graduation Event – hold a social event to celebrate student diver success, recognize their accomplishments and complete the final paperwork for certification as Tec Trimix Divers. Suggested: slide show or video from the course (shot by a staff member), plus slides/videos of upcoming trips/dives suited to Tec Trimix Divers.
  • Trimix4

    1. 1. DSAT Tec Trimix Diver Course Knowledge Development Presentation Four
    2. 2. Presentation Four Overview <ul><li>Thinking Like a Trimix Diver IV </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment III </li></ul>
    3. 3. Thinking Like a Trimix Diver IV <ul><li>Limits of Trimix Diving </li></ul><ul><li>Limits of Training </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Extending Your Limits </li></ul>
    4. 4. Limits of Trimix Diving <ul><li>What are the limits of trimix diving? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The limits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New beginning trimix divers - 75 metres/245 feet, or the maximum depth experienced during training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Experienced trimix divers – as deep as 90 metres/245 feet, or the maximum depth experienced during training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Highly experienced exploratory divers – between 90 metres/300 feet and 120 metres/400 feet </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maximum depth for this course 75 metres/245 feet </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Limits of Training <ul><li>What are the limits of your training in the Tec Trimix Diver course? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Restrict your diving limit after the course to 75 metres/245 feet or to the maximum depth reached in your training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dive under the conditions in which you were trained </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Visibility, temperature, fresh or salt water, etc. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Water motion, waves, surge and current </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Limits of Training <ul><li>How do you extend your limits as a Tec Trimix Diver? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To extend your limits give yourself some time and experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>After certification dive within your means </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Extend your limits gradually </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid pushing environmental and depth limits together </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Team up with more experienced divers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your limits will expand over time if that’s your interest </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Responsibilities <ul><li>What are your responsibilities as a Tec Trimix Diver with respect to the state of the art in trimix diving in particular, and technical diving in general? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Remember your responsibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>To accept the risks of trimix diving, tec diving and risks that accompany expanding your limits </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>To stay informed with tec diving in general, trimix in particular </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Technology and procedures </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Decompression theory </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Responsibilities <ul><li>Responsibilities as a Tec Trimix Diver </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep in mind: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t tec dive if acceptable risk becomes intolerable or your physical condition makes risk unacceptable </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Keep your skills and knowledge fresh and current </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Think of your team’s safety </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Extending Your Limits <ul><li>What is the most important personal quality with respect to extending your limits? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The most important quality is patience </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t be in a hurry to push your limits </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Take time to stay current </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Refresh and practice your skills </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t be afraid to say “no” to a dive you’re not prepared for </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Know and stay within your personal limits </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Equipment III <ul><li>Crush Depth </li></ul><ul><li>Depth Rating for Equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Exceeding Equipment Rated Depths </li></ul><ul><li>Other Depth Related Effects </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing Depth Rated Equipment </li></ul>
    11. 11. Crush Depth <ul><li>What is “crush depth” for a piece of equipment? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Crush depth - the depth at which equipment can fail due to pressure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Primarily concerned with air filled equipment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Also concerns anything made of a compressible material like Styrofoam </li></ul></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Crush Depth <ul><li>Why is crush depth an issue for trimix diving? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Crush depth - an issue for trimix diving as most dive equipment was designed for 40 metres/130 feet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Tec diving to 50 metres/165 within the design specs of most gear </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More of a concern below 60 metres/200 feet </li></ul></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Depth Rating for Equipment <ul><li>How do your determine a piece of equipment’s depth rating? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine the depth rating for equipment by consulting manufacture’s literature or by contacting the manufacture or supplier </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wise to test equipment by taking it the desired depth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pressure stress can be cumulative </li></ul></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Depth Rating for Equipment <ul><li>What is the safest course with respect to avoiding crush depth? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lowest failure risk is to use equipment designed for desired depth </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Exceeding Equipment Rated Depths <ul><li>What risk do you face by exceeding equipment’s depth rating? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diving to or beyond a specific depth rating for a piece of equipment poses risks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Catastrophic failure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sudden negative buoyancy can create a hazard </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Seal failure, and cracking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Most likely with camera housings, strobes and DPVs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Unit floods </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Non catastrophic crush </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pressure distorts the equipment affecting it internally </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Other Depth Related Effects <ul><li>What other depth-related equipment issues might you encounter as a trimix diver? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most electron gauges/computers have depth limits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Failure to stay within your gauge’s limit can leave you without depth/time information </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BCD/dry suit inflation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>As you go deep, increased air density slows speed at which you can inflate BCD/dry suits </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wet suits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Insulate far less effectively at extreme depth due to neoprene compression continued… </li></ul></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Other Depth Related Effects <ul><li>More related risks include </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Regulators </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lower performance models may have noticeable delivery problems at trimix depths </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reliable, lower end regulators may be fine for shallow use on decompression cylinders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decompression model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Anecdotal reports suggest that current deco methodologies become less reliable below 100 metres/300 feet </li></ul></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Choosing Depth Rated Equipment <ul><li>What should you look for with respect to equipment rated to deep depths? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Since the success of the mission depends on it choose your equipment with these considerations in mind </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Select equipment with a manufactures rating rated deeper than your intended use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Liquid filled gauges resist pressure far better than air-filled </li></ul></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Choosing Depth Rated Equipment <ul><li>The success of the mission depends on it </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When choosing equipment consider: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Large items with light canisters and DPVs tolerate pressure better if built with internal bulkheads </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Camera equipment is rarely rated below 75 metres/245 feet, choose wisely or it could be expensive </li></ul></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Practical Application Four - Objectives <ul><li>Working as a team and using desktop deco software </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan two trimix dives, both with deep stops </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plans to include gas consumption, oxygen exposure, decompression schedules, turn pressures and contingency decompression schedules for each team member </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan a team-chosen mission studying pressure effects on an object </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accounting for time required, specific tasks, individual team duties and the effects on general diving </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Practical Application Five - Objectives <ul><li>Working as a team and using desktop deco software, plan two trimix dives, both with deep stops </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The plans to include gas consumption, oxygen exposure, decompression schedules, turn pressures and contingency decompression schedules for each team member. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Working as a team, plan a team-chosen mission for each dive </li></ul>
    22. 22. Tec Trimix Diver Exam <ul><li>Let’s write the exam </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There’s 50 questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple choice, fill in the blank and calculation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hour and a half time limit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May use a pen or pencil, scrap paper and the tables in the Tec Trimix Diver Manual and the Tec Deep Diver Manual and a calculator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80 percent is the minimum score required </li></ul></ul><ul><li>We’ll review any of the questions you may have missed </li></ul>
    23. 23. Presentation Four Review <ul><li>Thinking Like a Trimix Diver IV </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment III </li></ul><ul><li>Practical Application Four – Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Practical Application Five - Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Tec Trimix Diver Exam </li></ul>
    24. 24. Let’s Go Diving <ul><li>Training Dive Five - Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Training Dive Six - Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Training Dive Seven - Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Training Dive Eight - Objectives </li></ul>
    25. 25. Training Dive Five - Objectives <ul><li>Working within a team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rig gear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A G ood D iver’s M ain O bjective I s T o L ive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B eing W ary R educes A ll F ailures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive </li></ul><ul><li>On the bottom respond correctly to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A simulated regulator freeflow or manifold failure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A simulated runaway inflator (BCD or backup) continued… </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Training Dive Five - Objectives <ul><li>Working as a team, attempt to complete the dive mission chosen together </li></ul><ul><li>As a team, deploy a lift bag </li></ul><ul><li>As a team, deploy a second lift bag up the line of the previously deployed lift bag </li></ul><ul><li>While decompressing, respond to an ascent emergency scenario </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate time, depth and gas supply awareness </li></ul>
    27. 27. Training Dive Six - Objectives <ul><li>Working within a team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rig gear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A G ood D iver’s M ain O bjective I s T o L ive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B eing W ary R educes A ll F ailures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive </li></ul><ul><li>Execute a mission to study and document the effects of pressure on an object continued… </li></ul>
    28. 28. Training Dive Six - Objectives <ul><li>While decompressing, respond to an ascent emergency scenario </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate time, depth and gas supply awareness </li></ul>
    29. 29. Training Dive Seven - Objectives <ul><li>Working within a team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rig gear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A G ood D iver’s M ain O bjective I s T o L ive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B eing W ary R educes A ll F ailures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive </li></ul><ul><li>As a team execute a mission chosen by the team </li></ul>
    30. 30. Training Dive Eight - Objectives <ul><li>Working within a team </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rig gear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A G ood D iver’s M ain O bjective I s T o L ive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B eing W ary R educes A ll F ailures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plan and execute a trimix accelerated decompression dive </li></ul><ul><li>As a team execute a mission chosen by the team </li></ul>
    31. 31. Graduation <ul><li>Congratulations – you’re now “at the bottom of the top” </li></ul><ul><li>Respect and follow all the rules and procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Keep informed and dive frequently </li></ul><ul><li>Extend your limits gradually </li></ul><ul><li>There’s a new world out there waiting to be explored! </li></ul>
    32. 32. DSAT Tec Trimix Diver Course Knowledge Development Presentation Four End Show

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