Brick 2, 3, 4

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Brick 2, 3, 4

  1. 1. Group 4EDTC 6320Part CBrick 2: The Learning SeatBrick 3: The Performance PlaceBrick 4: Instructional Objectives
  2. 2. Brick 2: the Learning seatThe locale and situation that the learnerswill access the information.
  3. 3. Brick 2
  4. 4. Brick 2
  5. 5. Brick 2
  6. 6. Brick 3: Performance place
  7. 7. Brick 3
  8. 8. Brick 4: instructional objectives(6) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The studentcompares and classifies two- and three-dimensionalfigures using geometric vocabulary and properties.The student is expected to: (A) use angle measurements to classify pairs of angles as complementary or supplementary; (B) use properties to classify triangles and quadrilaterals; (C) use properties to classify three-dimensional figures, including pyramids, cones, prisms, and cylinders; and (D) use critical attributes to define similarity.
  9. 9. EXAMPLEUse properties to classify three-dimensionalfigures, includingpyramids, cones, prisms, and cylinders
  10. 10. Brick 4: instructional objectives(7) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The studentuses coordinate geometry to describe location on aplane. The student is expected to: (A) locate and name points on a coordinate plane using ordered pairs of integers; and (B) graph reflections across the horizontal or vertical axis and graph translations on a coordinate plane.
  11. 11. EXAMPLELocate and name points on a coordinateplane using ordered pairs of integers.
  12. 12. Brick 4: instructional objectives(8) Geometry and spatial reasoning. Thestudent uses geometry to model and describethe physical world. The student is expected to: (A) sketch three-dimensional figures when given the top, side, and front views; (B) make a net (two-dimensional model) of the surface area of a three-dimensional figure; and (C) use geometric concepts and properties to solve problems in fields such as art and architecture.
  13. 13. EXAMPLEUse geometric concepts and properties tosolve problems in fields such as art andarchitecture
  14. 14. ReferencesAlamy, M. (Photographer). (2012) Standardized testing [Photograph], Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/29/school- testing_n_2214362.html?utm_hp_ref=standardized-testingAlamy, M. (Photographer). (2012) Standardized testing [Photograph], Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/26/alexandra-karlson-new- york_n_2363072.html?utm_hp_ref=standardized-testingArnold, K. (Photographer). (2013) Math Students [Photograph], Retrieved February 27, 2013, from http://www.manorisd.netBennett, J. (2007). Holt mathematics. Orlando, Fla: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Blackboard. (2013). Retrieved March 3, 2013, from https://myutbtsc.blackboard.comChapter 111. Texas essential knowledge and skills for mathematics subchapter B. middle school. (September, 2012 09). Retrieved from http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter111/ch111b.htmlCK-12 Foundation. (2012). Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://www.ck12.org/user:amRvdXRoYXRAd2lja2VuYnVyZy5rMTIuYXoudXM./se ction/Volume-of-Prisms-and-Cylinders/Microsoft PowerPoint (14.2.2) [Computer Software]. Redmond, WA.

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