Broadband Access Over Cable Networks

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Presentation on Multimedia Conference, 1999.

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Broadband Access Over Cable Networks

  1. 1. Broadband Access Over Cable Networks Xiaolin Lu Multimedia 1999 AT&T LabsXL 9/15/99
  2. 2. What is this?  An invited speech on Multimedia 1999  A historical review of the cable technology evolution, and why it is what it is todayXL 9/15/99
  3. 3. ACCESS ENVIRONMENT LEC Wire line Cable Voice Video  Communication  Entertainment  Narrowband  Broadband  Circuit Switch  Broadcast DBS/LMDS Cellular Wireless /MMDSXL 9/15/99
  4. 4. IN THE PAST ... Voice = Communication Video = Entertainment LEC Cable  Twist Pair Star  Coax Tree-and-Branch  Feature rich POTS  Broadcast video  $84B “toll collection”  $24B “$1 buffet”  Monopoly  Voice-oriented  DLC, ISDN  FTTHXL 9/15/99
  5. 5. CHANGING PERSPECTIVES LEC- LEC-Centric Mosaic Network  RF Modem  Mix of access options  DSP Performance  Wired  Utilize existing plants  SCM Lightwave  Switched  Evolution & revolution Applications  Bandwidth  Broadband access  Internet network  Feature- Feature-rich  Multimedia Voice  Router performance  IP based  Stationary  LAN extension  Mobility/tetherless Business  Telecom Reform  Market maturity &  Competition  Monopoly growthXL 9/15/99
  6. 6. OPTIONS LEC  Narrowband  Switched  DLC  Rebuild Wireless  Mobility FTTH  Broadband Cable  Network Upgrade Deep Fiber  Broadband  Broadcast  Cable modem PenetrationXL 9/15/99
  7. 7. XL 9/15/99
  8. 8. CABLE DATA REVENUE PROJECTION (US) 1000 800 Revenue ($M) 600 Kagan 400 Forrester 200 0 96 97 98 99 2000XL 9/15/99
  9. 9. ASSET AND LIABILITY  Broadband (1GHz) ? Quality and Reliability  Low- Low-cost Connection ? Upstream  Ubiquity ? Maintenance  Coverage (95% US HHP) ? Reputation  Acceptance (TV) ? Scale  Evolution in The New EnvironmentXL 9/15/99
  10. 10. TECHNOLOGY EVOLUTION Network  Scalable architecture  Lightwave and RF  Interconnect Terminal Operation  Low cost  Powering  User friendly  MaintenanceXL 9/15/99
  11. 11. NETWORK UPGRADE  DWDM  Segmentation COAX HFC  Digitization  Deep fiber penetrationXL 9/15/99
  12. 12. COAX TO HFC HEXL 9/15/99
  13. 13. COAX TO HFC FN FN HE FN  Increase transport capability  Improve quality and reliabilityXL 9/15/99
  14. 14. CHALLENGES HE FN HE FN HE FN Analog Emerging TV Services 5 50 500 750 1G  Bandwidth Capacity: 5-40MHz/1000s HHP upstream  Transport Integrity: Ingress noise, dynamic range  103-to-1 Architecture: Upstream MAC to-XL 9/15/99
  15. 15. SOLUTIONS Bandwidth  FiberNode Capacity Network Segmentation  DWDM Trunk  New Platform Transport Integrity  DOCSIS  High level Modem modulation  Centrally- Centrally- 103-to-1 mediated MAC  Simple Protocol ArchitectureXL 9/15/99
  16. 16. HFC IN THE MAKING SH FN Primary SH Hub FN SH  Segmentation  FSS  DWDM  Node Splitting  DWDM  SONET  Ring-In-Ring  dbr DOCSIS ModemXL 9/15/99
  17. 17. MORE CHALLENGES  Bandwidth Demands  Take rate and multiple lines  New services (streaming)  User behavior (always-on, SOHO)  Operation Savings Network  Sweep Evolution  Maintenance  Powering  Performance  Reliability  QoSXL 9/15/99
  18. 18. FIBER OPTICS ? Node 2,000+HP 1,200HP 600HP 200HP 100HP Size HOW Deep ? HOW To ?XL 9/15/99
  19. 19. ARCHITECTURES Tree-and-Branch  Broadcast FN  Cascaded ??? Cell-Based  Narrowcast RN  ClusteredXL 9/15/99
  20. 20. TM LightWire HUB MuxNode mFN mFN Existing/reduced New fiber along coax branch  Passive coax between mFN and subscribers  Reduced actives, power consumption, and maintenance  MuxNode to reduce cost of deep fiber penetration  Multi-dimension Multiplexing/demultiplexingXL 9/15/99
  21. 21. TM LightWire HUB MuxNode DiPr RF SCM Distributed DiPr DiPr Processing Analog & TSD Digital TV Today 10 50 550 750 1G  Increased bandwidth and flexibility for current services  Simultaneously support current and future systemsXL 9/15/99
  22. 22. ADVANTAGES  Operation Savings  61% reduction in active components  Reduced power consumption  Simplification of maintenance  Improved Performance  Reduced ingress noise funneling (10-48MHz operation)  Increased RF bandwidth  Improved reliability  Future Proof  Flexibility between current track and future opportunities  Improved QoS and further cost reductionXL 9/15/99
  23. 23. OPERATION SAVINGS  Current Network: 5.5 actives/mileXL 9/15/99
  24. 24. OPERATION SAVINGS  61% reduction in active components  21+% improvement in reliabilityXL 9/15/99
  25. 25. FIELD TRIAL  Objective:  Support planned upgrade: bandwidth expansion  Test technology, verify cost & operation saving  Trial Scope:  520 miles (66,619 HHP) in Salt Lake Metro  Phased development and implementation  Schedule:  Service launching: October, 1999  Data collection: January, 2000XL 9/15/99
  26. 26. INTEGRATED SERVICE DELIVERY Entertainment & Communications Communications Subscribers Subscribers TV Broadband Advanced Digital Communications Interface HFC Set-Top Box Packet Headend Network Video Router / Proxy PSTN 26 Sources ServerXL 9/15/99
  27. 27. EVOLUTION Broadband Full Service Platform DOCSIS Open Cable Packet Cable  High speed  Universal set  End-to- End-to-end IP cable modem top box platform UPGRADE  DWDM  Capacity  RF  Quality  DSP  ReliabilityXL 9/15/99

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