JISC eContent Funding Calls 11/10 and 16/10

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Alastair Dunning's Presentation from the JISC Digital Content Partnerships event (28 October 2010), looking at Strand A of Grant call 11/10 on Enriching via Collaboration, and grant call 16/10 on Rapid Digitisation

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  • Importance of digital resources having clear, identifiable name and avoiding remaining for niche audiences

    Finding different audiences within the sector, differetn subejcts, sifferent levels of students, different way of delivering content.
  • JISC eContent Funding Calls 11/10 and 16/10

    1. 1. Details of JISC eContent Funding Calls Enriching via Collaboration (11/10 Strand A) Rapid Digitisation (16/10) Alastair Dunning JISC Programme Manager 0203 006 6065 a.dunning@jisc.ac.uk http://digitisation.jiscinvolve.org/ October 2010 1
    2. 2. Enriching via Collaboration (11/10 Strand A) “This strand wishes to explore clustering digital resources around themes relevant to research and teaching, or enhancing digital content by improving functionality and interfaces. It is also concerned with how existing audiences can be expanded and new ones discovered. The outputs should have a clear purpose within HE or FE teaching and research, but can also be of interest to a broader community.” 2
    3. 3. Enriching via Collaboration (11/10 Strand A) • Funding – £400k, 4-5 projects, £50k-£100k per project • Timescales – Submitting Bids – 12 noon, 10 December 2010 – 10 sheets of A4 to digitisation-bids@jisc.ac.uk – Projects Start by : 1 March 2011 – Projects End by : 30 September 2011 – Therefore, 7 months maximum 3
    4. 4. Enriching: Partnerships • Single university in UK, and some FE institutions • Must have partner either from HE or outside • Partner(s) cannot have more funds than lead institutions • Eligible - University of X receives £60k, Partner 1 receives £30k • Ineligible – University of Y receives £40k, Partner 1 receives £30k, Partner 2 receives £20k • JISC sets no fEC levels; institutional contributions show value for money 4
    5. 5. Enriching: Why Partnerships? • Increased importance in economic climate • Stressed by meeting of Digital Content Taskforce, July 2010 • Possibilities for new content, new audiences, new methodologies, new platforms 5
    6. 6. Enriching: Examples • The partner organisations working together to repackage or cluster existing digital content for both current and new audiences. – For example, taking multiple existing resources and creating one single product with a more marketable theme • Exposing digitised content currently utilised by a limited HE or FE audience to an expanded number of users and audiences – For example, exposing content via new web platforms and devices, or improving the quality and relevance of an existing resource • Exposing the content from the partner organisation to an HE and FE audience – For example, exposing the content from a museum, society or business to HE audiences 6
    7. 7. Enriching: Examples • The partner organisations working together to repackage or cluster existing digital content for both current and new audiences. – King’s College’s Anglo-Saxon Cluster, http://www.ascluster.org/, brought together three separate resources on Anglo Saxon history • Exposing digitised content currently utilised by a limited HE or FE audience to an expanded number of users and audiences – Victoria Climbié Inquiry Data Corpus Online, http://www.jisc- content.ac.uk/collections/victoria-climbie-inquiry-data-corpus-online • Exposing the content from the partner organisation to an HE and FE audience – National Archives Cabinet Papers - http://www.jisc- content.ac.uk/collections/cabinet-papers-1915-1978 • Other existing examples – see http://www.jisc-content.ac.uk/ 7
    8. 8. Rapid Digitisation (16/10) • Funding – £400k, 5-7 projects, £50k-£100k per project • Timescales – Submitting Bids – 12 noon, 10 December 2010 – 10 sheets of A4 to digitisation-bids@jisc.ac.uk – Projects Start by : 1 March 2011 – Projects End by : 31 July 2011 – Therefore, 5 months maximum 8
    9. 9. Rapid Digi: Partnerships • Single university in England, and some FE institutions • Can have partner either from HE, FE or outside • Partner(s) cannot have more funds than lead institutions • Eligible - Uni of X receives £60k, Partner 1 receives £30k • Ineligible – Uni of Y receives £40k, Partner 1 receives £30k, Partner 2 receives £20k • JISC sets no fEC levels; institutional contributions show value for money 9
    10. 10. Rapid Digi: Scope • Addition of new digitised content to existing digital resources; the value and potential impact of adding any new content should be demonstrated. • Digitisation of small collections; as with above, the value, and the relationship to existing digital collections, should be articulated. • Pilot digitisation work to test the viability and value of digitising a larger collection. • Undertaking digitisation with new technologies (e.g. 3D scanning). 10
    11. 11. Rapid Digi: Examples • Addition of new digitised content to existing digital resources; – Historical Hansards adding to existing Stormont Papers • Digitisation of small collections; – Serving Solider – First World War archive • Pilot digitisation work to test the viability and value of digitising a larger collection – 19th Century Pamphlets Scoping Study • Undertaking digitisation with new technologies (e.g. 3D scanning). – University of Birmingham Eton Myers Collection of Egyptian Artefacts 11
    12. 12. Both Calls: IPR and Licensing • Projects with complex IPR clearance unlikely to get funding • Outputs must be freely available for use and re-use for 5 years within HE and FE • Desirable to have open access – Advertise terms and conditions! Use suitable licence! 12
    13. 13. Both Calls: Priorities • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Medicine) • Special Collections / Primary sources • It is likely that some, *but not all*, projects will be funded from either both or either of these categories 13
    14. 14. Both Calls: Define Users • End point of digital content should be in teaching and research • Show who your users will be. Get evidence that there is demand • Build in capability for assessing value and impact • What will the value and impact of digital content be? • Existing programme on Impact and Embedding of Digitised Resources • Oxford University Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources • Expose your content - advice via Strategic Content Alliance • Findings from Log Analysis in Arts and Humanities, UCL 14
    15. 15. Both Calls: Reducing Costs • JISC recognise sums do not allow for advanced projects • Usage of existing infrastructures whether institutional or third-party are welcome • Lightweight solutions for both creating and processing digital content and related metadata favoured. 15
    16. 16. Final points on both calls • Project Management • Communications and Dissemination • Risk Analysis • IPR and licensing position • Users and evaluation 16 • Digital Lifecycle • Selection – capture – description – delivery- sustainability and preservation • Innovation Within ten pages ?!! Tackle key points, skim over easier ones
    17. 17. Further assistance • JISC staff are not in a position to read individual draft proposals • JISC staff can speak about individual projects at the meeting today. • For further advice on individual applications email a.dunning@jisc.ac.uk (Slots available on 29 Oct and 8 Nov) 17
    18. 18. Images • At the Front, Designed by Earnest Ibbotson http://www.vads.ac.uk/large.php?uid=26879&sos=1 • Stained Glass from Merton College, Cambridge http://www.cvma.ac.uk/jsp/record.do?photodataKey=6058&mode=CVMA _INV_NO&recordView=DETAIL • Women of Britain say “Go”, Kealey, E V http://www.vads.ac.uk/large.php?uid=26186&sos=5 18

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