Up in Smoke
By : Darrin Wyszomirski
Table of Content
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Smoking and Ethnic Background
Youth Prevalence
Peer Pressure
Health Risks of Smo...
Smoking and Ethnic Backgrounds
Campaign For Tobacco Free Kids
• Smoking does not discriminate and affects all ethnic backg...
Smoking and Ethnic Backgrounds
Con’t
• American Indian and Alaskan Native adults
have the highest tobacco use rate of all
...
Youth Prevalence
• Nationwide 18.1% of all high school
students are current smokers 19.9% are
males and 16.1 females.
Peer Pressure: Don’t be a
Follower
• Teens are more likely to get hooked on cigarettes if their
friends smoke.
• Teens who...
Chemical in Cigarette Smoke
• Harmful Effects of Tobacco Smoke
• Cigarettes and more specifically tobacco
smoke are full o...
Chemicals
• Benzene (petrol additive)
A colorless cyclic hydrocarbon obtained from coal
and petroleum, used as a solvent i...
Chemicals
• Formaldehyde (embalming fluid)
A colorless liquid, highly poisonous, used
to preserve dead bodies - also found...
Chemicals
• Acetone (nail polish remover)
Fragrant volatile liquid ketone, used as a solvent,
for example, nail polish rem...
Chemicals in Cigarette Smoke
• Nicotine (insecticide/addictive drug)
One of the most addictive substances known to man, a
...
Chemicals in Cigarette Smoke
• Arsenic (rat poison), Hydrogen Cyanide
(gas chamber poison)
Effects of Tobacco Smoke
• Smoking KILLS
• Every year hundreds of thousands of people
around the world die from diseases c...
Effects of Tobacco Smoke
• The mixture of nicotine and carbon monoxide in
each cigarette you smoke temporarily increases
y...
Effects of Tobacco Smoke
• Carbon monoxide robs your muscles, brain and
body tissue of oxygen, making your whole body
and ...
Effects of Tobacco Smoke
• Lung cancer from smoking is caused by the
tar in tobacco smoke. Men who smoke are
ten times mor...
Effects of Tobacco Smoke
• Smoking causes fat deposits to narrow and
block blood vessels which leads to heart
attack.
• Sm...
Hurting Others
• Smoking harms not just the smoker, but
also family members, coworkers and others
who breathe the smoker's...
Hurting Others
• Among infants to 18 months of age,
secondhand smoke is associated with as
many as 300,000 cases of bronch...
Hurting Others
• Secondhand smoke from a parent's cigarette
increases a child's chances for middle ear
problems, causes co...
Smoking Aimed at Youth and
Minorities
• Higher levels of nicotine theoretically could
make new smokers more easily addicte...
Nicotine Up Sharply In Many Cigarettes
Some Brands More Than 30% Stronger
• The amount of nicotine in most cigarettes
rose...
Smoking Aimed at Youth and
Minorities
• The nicotine in Marlboro products,
preferred by two-thirds of high school
smokers,...
Smoking Aimed at Youth and
Minorities
• In 1998, Newport 100s and unfiltered
Camels were tied for highest nicotine yield
a...
Menthol and nicotine
• Menthol may directly promote nicotine
craving because it binds to a specific
nicotine receptor.
• I...
Menthol and nicotine
• Studies suggest that menthol in cigarettes is
likely associated with greater addiction.
Menthol smo...
Why Quit?
• Quitting smoking cuts the risk of lung cancer, many other
cancers, heart disease, stroke, other lung diseases,...
Why Quit?
• Benefits of Quitting:
It only takes 20 minutes after you've
smoked your last cigarette for your body to
begin ...
Why Quit?
• 20 minutes:
Blood pressure drops to normal; pulse rate
drops to normal; increased circulation in
hands
Why Quit?
• 8 hours:
Oxygen level in your blood increases to
normal; carbon monoxide level in your
blood drops
• 24 hours:...
Why Quit?
• 48 hours:
Your ability to smell and taste is already
improved; walking is becoming easier.
• 2 weeks to 3 mont...
Why Quit?
• 1 month to 9 months:
You'll notice that coughing, sinus
congestion and shortness of breath have
decreased dram...
Why Quit?
• 1 year:
Your risk of coronary heart disease is cut in
half.
• 5 years:
Risk of stroke reduced to that of a
non...
Why Quit?
• 15 years:
Congratulations! Your risk for coronary
heart disease and stroke is the same as for a
lifelong nonsm...
Fill in the blank and sentence completion
• Which ethnic background has the highest
rate of smokers?
• Tobacco smoke conta...
Fill in the blank and sentence completion
• _______ and ________ are addictive
substances that make it harder for
establis...
Closing
• Can anyone tell me about some of the topics
on cigarette smoking discussed in this
presentation?
References
• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 31
Jan. 2014. Web. 13...
References
• "Getting Help to Quit Smoking - American Lung
Association." American Lung Association. N.p.,
n.d. Web. 13 Feb...
References
• Rhode Island Tobacco Control Program. Retrieved
February 8, 2014, from Rhode Island Dept of
Health Web site:
...
References
• Brown , David Nicotine Up Sharply In Many
Cigarettes. (2014, February 8). Washington Post,
p. Health.
• Natio...
References
• "Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking." Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for
Disease Contro...
References
• "Tobacco Use." American Lung Association State
of Lung Disease in Diverse Communities 2010.
Centers for Disea...
References
• "Carcinogen." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation,
02 Dec. 2014. Web. 13 Feb. 2014.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki...
References
• "Peer Pressure Biggest Influence on Teen
Smokers: Study." CBC News Canada. N.p., 12
Aug. 2002. Web. 10 Feb. 2...
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Up in smoke power point

  1. 1. Up in Smoke By : Darrin Wyszomirski
  2. 2. Table of Content • • • • • • • • • • • • Smoking and Ethnic Background Youth Prevalence Peer Pressure Health Risks of Smoking Chemicals in Cigarette Smoke Effects of Tobacco Smoke Hurting Others Smoking Aimed at Youth and Minorities Menthol and Nicotine Why Quit? Web Sites for Smoking Cessation help References
  3. 3. Smoking and Ethnic Backgrounds Campaign For Tobacco Free Kids • Smoking does not discriminate and affects all ethnic backgrounds…. • Adult Prevalence 21.6% of men and 16.5% of women smoke in the US • African American Adults 24.2% of men and 15.5% of women (75 % of all African American smokers smoke menthol cigarettes, compared to 23% of all Caucasian smokers. • 12.9% of Hispanic adults 17% of men and 8.6% of women are current smokers however, certain Hispanic subgroups have very high percentages of smoking. • Cuban men and women born in the United States have the highest rate of smoking out of Hispanic subgroups 29.8% and 30.0% • Puerto Rican men and women are the second highest 26.1 and 14.1 • Mexicans men 22% and women 8.9
  4. 4. Smoking and Ethnic Backgrounds Con’t • American Indian and Alaskan Native adults have the highest tobacco use rate of all major racial/ethnic groups in America 34.4% of men and 29.1% of women • Asian Americans have the lowest smoking rate of all major American racial/ethnic groups men 14.9% and women 5.5%
  5. 5. Youth Prevalence • Nationwide 18.1% of all high school students are current smokers 19.9% are males and 16.1 females.
  6. 6. Peer Pressure: Don’t be a Follower • Teens are more likely to get hooked on cigarettes if their friends smoke. • Teens who had at least two friends who smoked were more than six times as likely to become intermittent smokers than those whose friends didn't smoke. • These teens were also 10 times more likely than others to go from intermittent smoking to daily smoking.
  7. 7. Chemical in Cigarette Smoke • Harmful Effects of Tobacco Smoke • Cigarettes and more specifically tobacco smoke are full of chemicals and poisons. • Tobacco smoke contains over 4,000 chemicals, many of which make smoking harmful.
  8. 8. Chemicals • Benzene (petrol additive) A colorless cyclic hydrocarbon obtained from coal and petroleum, used as a solvent in fuel and in chemical manufacture - and contained in cigarette smoke. It is a known carcinogen and is associated with leukemia. • A carcinogen is any substance, radionuclide, or radiation that is an agent directly involved in causing cancer.
  9. 9. Chemicals • Formaldehyde (embalming fluid) A colorless liquid, highly poisonous, used to preserve dead bodies - also found in cigarette smoke. Known to cause cancer, respiratory, skin and gastrointestinal problems.
  10. 10. Chemicals • Acetone (nail polish remover) Fragrant volatile liquid ketone, used as a solvent, for example, nail polish remover - found in cigarette smoke. • Tar Particulate matter drawn into lungs when you inhale on a lighted cigarette. Once inhaled, smoke condenses and about 70 per cent of the tar in the smoke is deposited in the smoker's lungs.
  11. 11. Chemicals in Cigarette Smoke • Nicotine (insecticide/addictive drug) One of the most addictive substances known to man, a powerful and fast-acting medical and non-medical poison. This is the chemical which causes addiction. • Carbon Monoxide (CO) (car exhaust fumes) An odorless, tasteless and poisonous gas, rapidly fatal in large amounts - it's the same gas that comes out of car exhausts and is the main gas in cigarette smoke, formed when the cigarette is lit.
  12. 12. Chemicals in Cigarette Smoke • Arsenic (rat poison), Hydrogen Cyanide (gas chamber poison)
  13. 13. Effects of Tobacco Smoke • Smoking KILLS • Every year hundreds of thousands of people around the world die from diseases caused by smoking.
  14. 14. Effects of Tobacco Smoke • The mixture of nicotine and carbon monoxide in each cigarette you smoke temporarily increases your heart rate and blood pressure, straining your heart and blood vessels. • This can cause heart attacks and stroke. It slows your blood flow, cutting off oxygen to your feet and hands. Some smokers end up having their limbs amputated.
  15. 15. Effects of Tobacco Smoke • Carbon monoxide robs your muscles, brain and body tissue of oxygen, making your whole body and especially your heart work harder. Over time, your airways swell up and let less air into your lungs. • Smoking often causes years of suffering. Emphysema is an illness that slowly rots your lungs. People with emphysema often get bronchitis again and again, and suffer lung and heart failure.
  16. 16. Effects of Tobacco Smoke • Lung cancer from smoking is caused by the tar in tobacco smoke. Men who smoke are ten times more likely to die from lung cancer than non-smokers.
  17. 17. Effects of Tobacco Smoke • Smoking causes fat deposits to narrow and block blood vessels which leads to heart attack. • Smoking causes around one in five deaths from heart disease.
  18. 18. Hurting Others • Smoking harms not just the smoker, but also family members, coworkers and others who breathe the smoker's cigarette smoke, called secondhand smoke.
  19. 19. Hurting Others • Among infants to 18 months of age, secondhand smoke is associated with as many as 300,000 cases of bronchitis and pneumonia each year.
  20. 20. Hurting Others • Secondhand smoke from a parent's cigarette increases a child's chances for middle ear problems, causes coughing and wheezing, and worsens asthma conditions. If both parents smoke, a teenager is more than twice as likely to smoke than a young person whose parents are both non-smokers. In households where only one parent smokes, young people are also more likely to start smoking.
  21. 21. Smoking Aimed at Youth and Minorities • Higher levels of nicotine theoretically could make new smokers more easily addicted and make it harder for established smokers to quit. • This is the reason it is so important to speak to youth groups before they begin to smoke.
  22. 22. Nicotine Up Sharply In Many Cigarettes Some Brands More Than 30% Stronger • The amount of nicotine in most cigarettes rose an average of almost 10 percent from 1.72mg in 1998 to 1.98 mg in 2004, with brands most popular with young people and minorities registering the biggest increases and highest nicotine content, according to a new study. The Washington Post
  23. 23. Smoking Aimed at Youth and Minorities • The nicotine in Marlboro products, preferred by two-thirds of high school smokers, increased 12 percent. Kool lights increased 30 percent. 75 percent of African American smokers use menthol brands.
  24. 24. Smoking Aimed at Youth and Minorities • In 1998, Newport 100s and unfiltered Camels were tied for highest nicotine yield at 2.9 milligrams. In 2004, Newport had risen to 3.2 milligrams, and five other brands measured 3 milligrams or higher.
  25. 25. Menthol and nicotine • Menthol may directly promote nicotine craving because it binds to a specific nicotine receptor. • It is found that the substance menthol can initialize a long-term effect by triggering areas of the brain that process pleasure, reward and addiction.
  26. 26. Menthol and nicotine • Studies suggest that menthol in cigarettes is likely associated with greater addiction. Menthol smokers show greater signs of nicotine dependence and are less likely to successfully quit smoking.
  27. 27. Why Quit? • Quitting smoking cuts the risk of lung cancer, many other cancers, heart disease, stroke, other lung diseases, and other respiratory illnesses. Ex-smokers have better health than current smokers. Exsmokers have fewer days of illness, fewer health complaints, and less bronchitis and pneumonia than current smokers. Quitting smoking saves money. A pack-a-day smoker, who pays $4 per pack can, expect to save more than $1400 per year. It appears that the price of cigarettes will continue to rise in coming years, as will the financial rewards of quitting.
  28. 28. Why Quit? • Benefits of Quitting: It only takes 20 minutes after you've smoked your last cigarette for your body to begin a series of beneficial changes. Just 20 minutes and you're already on your way to better health.
  29. 29. Why Quit? • 20 minutes: Blood pressure drops to normal; pulse rate drops to normal; increased circulation in hands
  30. 30. Why Quit? • 8 hours: Oxygen level in your blood increases to normal; carbon monoxide level in your blood drops • 24 hours: Your chance for a heart attack has already gone down.
  31. 31. Why Quit? • 48 hours: Your ability to smell and taste is already improved; walking is becoming easier. • 2 weeks to 3 months: Your circulation has improved. No more cold hands and cold feet. Your lung function has already increased up to 30%.
  32. 32. Why Quit? • 1 month to 9 months: You'll notice that coughing, sinus congestion and shortness of breath have decreased dramatically. Cilia have re-grown in your lungs increasing your ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs and reduce infection.
  33. 33. Why Quit? • 1 year: Your risk of coronary heart disease is cut in half. • 5 years: Risk of stroke reduced to that of a nonsmoker. Risk of cancers of the mouth, throat and esophagus cut in half. Risk of lung cancer reduced in half compared to a smoker.
  34. 34. Why Quit? • 15 years: Congratulations! Your risk for coronary heart disease and stroke is the same as for a lifelong nonsmoker.
  35. 35. Fill in the blank and sentence completion • Which ethnic background has the highest rate of smokers? • Tobacco smoke contains over ______ chemicals, many of which make smoking harmful. • Car fumes and cigarette smoke produce what type of gas? • _____ percent of African American smokers use menthol brands.
  36. 36. Fill in the blank and sentence completion • _______ and ________ are addictive substances that make it harder for established smokers to quit.
  37. 37. Closing • Can anyone tell me about some of the topics on cigarette smoking discussed in this presentation?
  38. 38. References • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 31 Jan. 2014. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. <http://cdc.gov/tips>. • "New York Smokers Quitline - Main Page." New York Smokers Quitline - Main Page. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. <https://www.nysmokefree.com/>.
  39. 39. References • "Getting Help to Quit Smoking - American Lung Association." American Lung Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. <http://www.lung.org/stop-smoking/how-toquit/getting-help/>.
  40. 40. References • Rhode Island Tobacco Control Program. Retrieved February 8, 2014, from Rhode Island Dept of Health Web site: http://www.health.ri.gov/disease/tobacco/tobaccob enefits.php
  41. 41. References • Brown , David Nicotine Up Sharply In Many Cigarettes. (2014, February 8). Washington Post, p. Health. • National Institute for Health Smoking Facts and Tips for Quitting. Retrieved February 9, 2014, from Facts about Smoking Web site: http://dccps.nci.nih.gov/tcrb/Smoking_Facts/facts. html
  42. 42. References • "Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 06 Feb. 2014. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. <http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_ sheets/health_effects/effects_cig_smoking/>. • Schmidt, Lorna. "Tobacco Use and Ethnicity." Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. N.p., 31 Jan. 2013. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/research/factsheet s/pdf/0005.pdf>.
  43. 43. References • "Tobacco Use." American Lung Association State of Lung Disease in Diverse Communities 2010. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention., n.d. Web. <http://www.lung.org/assets/documents/publicatio ns/solddc-chapters/tobacco.pdf>.
  44. 44. References • "Carcinogen." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 02 Dec. 2014. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carcinogen>. • Medical News Today. MediLexicon International, n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. <http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/2638 50.php>.
  45. 45. References • "Peer Pressure Biggest Influence on Teen Smokers: Study." CBC News Canada. N.p., 12 Aug. 2002. Web. 10 Feb. 2014. <http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/peer-pressurebiggest-influence-on-teen-smokers-study1.342542

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