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2016 Workshop in Denmark: Laudato Si!, UN SDGs and the spirit of Assisi

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“The spirit of Assisi, the Un SDG’s
and our invitation to become inspired
Instruments of Peace and all Good”
19-20th
Novem...

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Contents of Session
1. From Corporate Shell to Inspired (Servant)
Leadership;
2. UN Sustainable Development Goals and
Pari...

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Prof. Jeffrey Sachs- Earth Institute:
The Age of Sustainable Development
11/25/16
Clickable Video Presentation

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2016 Workshop in Denmark: Laudato Si!, UN SDGs and the spirit of Assisi

  1. 1. “The spirit of Assisi, the Un SDG’s and our invitation to become inspired Instruments of Peace and all Good” 19-20th November. With Assisi Mission in Denmark Adriaan Kamp Energy For One World
  2. 2. Contents of Session 1. From Corporate Shell to Inspired (Servant) Leadership; 2. UN Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Climate Change Agreement 3. The invitation to become an Inspired Instrument of Peace and All Good (Light & Love ) - The spirit of Assisi, UN SDGs and Laudato Si!
  3. 3. Prof. Jeffrey Sachs- Earth Institute: The Age of Sustainable Development 11/25/16 Clickable Video Presentation
  4. 4. Clickable Presentation
  5. 5. Living Planet Reports
  6. 6. Pope Francis and Laudato Si!
  7. 7. NASA Latest -September 2016
  8. 8. 25.11.16 Geopolitical shifts and re-alignments • Economic and finance system change and fundamentals • A new technological era: 4th Industrial Revolution. • Global production systems & the rise of new (multinational) corporations • Social Changes (network economies), and the quest for wealth justice • Planetary boundaries/ Resource Scarcities • Demographic change and migration/ Changing labour markets Global Change
  9. 9. 10 2014 2030-2050 7 Billion People 9 Billion People 90 trillion USD economy 180-210 trillion USD 225 million oil eq/day 500- 750 million oil eq/day 400 ppm CO2 and Carbon Budget consumed for 2 degrees/ 21st century ??? ppm CO2 and Climate Change Effects
  10. 10. 2/1/2012 Energy For One World- All Rights Reserved
  11. 11. 2016 Year of Organization for Change on Energy, Climate Change Agreement and the Sustainable Development post-2015 Agenda
  12. 12. UN FCCC COP21 Paris Two weeks Global Conference and Actions 11/25/16
  13. 13. UN FCCC COP21 Paris (2)
  14. 14. UN FCCC COP21 Paris (3) Paris Agreement Adaptation capacity-building climate finance Compliance intended nationally determined contributio loss and damage Mitigation national reporting Paris Outcome REDD/REDD+ Technology technology mechanism
  15. 15. UN FCCC COP21 Paris (3) Paris Agreement
  16. 16. UN FCCC COP21 Paris (3) COP 21 Conclusion
  17. 17. Clickable Access to Report
  18. 18. Transbiblica
  19. 19. Transbiblica
  20. 20. End Poverty in all its forms Everywhere Transbiblica
  21. 21. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture Transbiblica
  22. 22. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages Transbiblica
  23. 23. Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning Transbiblica
  24. 24. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls Transbiblica
  25. 25. Ensure access to water and sanitation for all Transbiblica
  26. 26. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for allTransbiblica
  27. 27. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for allTransbiblica
  28. 28. Build resilient infrastructure, promote sustainable industrialization and foster innovationTransbiblica
  29. 29. Reduce inequality within and among countriesTransbiblica
  30. 30. Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainableTransbiblica
  31. 31. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns Transbiblica
  32. 32. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts Transbiblica
  33. 33. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources Transbiblica
  34. 34. Sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, halt biodiversity loss Transbiblica
  35. 35. Promote just, peaceful and inclusive societiesTransbiblica
  36. 36. Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development Transbiblica
  37. 37. UN Regional Blocks Countries Cities Communities Companies and Institutes Co-alitions of the Willing
  38. 38. Sustainable Community Building
  39. 39. The Rise of a new middle-class ( 3 Billion) – in MegaCities and more people live in Greater Tokyo (35m) than in all of Canada The top 10 cities by population: 1. Tokyo, (34 million) 2. Seoul (24.4 million) 3. Guangzhou (24.2 million) 4. Mexico City (23.4 million) 5. Delhi (23.2 million) 6. Mumbai (22.8 million) 7. New York (22.2 million) 8. Sao Paolo (20.9 million) 9. Manila (19.6 million) 10.Shanghai (19.4 million) All above fit comfortably into the list Of Top-50 nations by population
  40. 40. Levels of Maturity of Change Integration- Transition- Transformation • Level 1 • Level 2 • Level 3 • Level 4 • Change and No Change. Resistance to Change. Policy, Administrative and Derivative Change (CO2 tax, ETS, Accounting). Coal vs. Gas. Continued backroom lobbying • Full Integration of Renewables (clean-tech, energy conservations, smartness, etc.) in the Energy Architecture - but not with a system change. Retained regulations, ownership , revenue, tax and capital control structures • Transition to a New Energy Architecture and Newly shared socio-economic and corporate business models- also in international trade • Transformation of Economies and Societies. Eco-modernity and New human consciousness
  41. 41. A New Business Worthiness Pledge The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals provide a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to end poverty, combat climate change and fight injustice and inequality. By applying innovation, resources and expertise, I will pursue the business opportunities inherent in building greener, more equitable and inclusive societies I am a business leader who knows that business cannot succeed in societies that fail. I will do my utmost to be businessworthy in all my efforts, and true to my business to support the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. I call on my peers to do the same.
  42. 42. A Journey into Assisi To see some new bridges between the lessons from Laudato Si! (Pope Francis) and the spirit of Assisi for our modern days business and government leadership. The invitation we have today is to see and to blend our consciousness and care for deep peace, deep humanity and deep ecology with our more mainstream economics and politics- at play.
  43. 43. St Francis of Assisi
  44. 44. Re-Build My Church
  45. 45. St Francis Prayers and Inspiration • Franciscan Prayer Lord, make me an instrument of your peace, Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy; O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love. For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. • Canticle of Creation O Most High, all-powerful, good Lord God, to you belong praise, glory, honour and all blessing. Be praised, my Lord, for all your creation and especially for our Brother Sun, who brings us the day and the light; he is strong and shines magnificently. O Lord, we think of you when we look at him. Be praised, my Lord, for Sister Moon, and for the stars which you have set shining and lovely in the heavens. Be praised, my Lord, for our Brothers Wind and Air and every kind of weather by which you, Lord, uphold life in all your creatures. Be praised, my Lord, for Sister Water, who is very useful to us, and humble and precious and pure. Be praised, my Lord, for Brother Fire, through whom you give us light in the darkness:
  46. 46. A 800 year holy pilgrim shrine, OFM order and tradition
  47. 47. Pope Francis and Laudato Si!
  48. 48. Pope Francis and his Encyclical – on Poverty, Stewardship and the Environment
  49. 49. Tales of Conversion
  50. 50. (Applied) Servant Leadership • Compassionate love • Authenticity • Humbleness • Empowerment • Provide direction • Stewardship
  51. 51. “In this form of Leadership- we are all students for life” Energy For One World- 2012, All Rights Reserved
  52. 52. Donations At present, we  seek Donations and Sponsorships for our Outreach & Impact programs- and would be very grateful if you see opportunity to gift, donate of support our work   Banking details: Rabo Bank Nr. (in the Netherlands): 0177098694 fao: Energy For One World (Adriaan Kamp Beheer BV) Remark: Campaign for Energy for One World IBAN/SEPA Number: NL53 RABO 01770986 94 BIC Number:RABONL2U Bank Name: Rabo Bank Group We thank you for your continued trust and support in our practice and working methods. AdriaanKamp@energyforoneworld.com Tel nr: 0031-6-20227364
  53. 53. One World. Many Needs. Many Views
  54. 54. Eco- Conscious  Moderated Consumerism  Limits to Growth  Cradle-to-Cradle, Bio-Mimicry  Zero emissions Nature First
  55. 55. Networked Society  Away with traditional country and/or corporate borders : City-Hubs.  Horizontal, cross-border collaborations  Cultural awareness and tolerance Power to the People
  56. 56.  Expansion of wealth, ownership and new growth  Continued Consumerism and Hedonistic life-styles.  Short-termism, Schumpeter, Ayn Rand, Resilience  A world of larger inequalities and divisions:  Rich and poor. Have’s and Have Not’s Money First Shared Capitalis m
  57. 57.  A world of Power , Principles and Politics  Polarisation between Beliefs and/or Power Blocks  The Geo-politics of Emotions Power to the Strongest, First Darwin
  58. 58. Techno Modernity  The world of Prof. Michio Kaku and  Kurz Weill Singularity  Game-changers and Disruptive Innovations  A world of Smart Cities, New Surprises , The Rule of Science & Technology
  59. 59.  Conscious Capitalism  The rise of new (global and business) leadership: Gandhi’s and Mandela’s  Neuroscience , psychology and spirituality  Gaia, Oneness and Global Mind-set. Transformative leadership Conscious Humanity
  60. 60. • 836 million people still live in extreme poverty • About one in five persons in developing regions lives on less than $1.25 per day • The overwhelming majority of people living on less than $1.25 a day belong to two regions: Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa • High poverty rates are often found in small, fragile and conflict-affected countries • One in seven children under age five in the world has inadequate height for his or her age • Every day in 2014, 42,000 people had to abandon their homes to seek protection due to conflict Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  61. 61. • By 2030, eradicate extreme poverty for all people everywhere, currently measured as people living on less than $1.25 a day 1.2 • By 2030, reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions • Implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable • By 2030, ensure that all men and women, in particular the poor and the vulnerable, have equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of 13 property, inheritance, natural resources, appropriate new technology and financial services, including microfinance • By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters • Ensure significant mobilization of resources from a variety of sources, including through enhanced development cooperation, in order to provide adequate and predictable means for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, to implement programmes and policies to end poverty in all its dimensions • Create sound policy frameworks at the national, regional and international levels, based on pro- poor and gender-sensitive development strategies, to support accelerated investment in poverty eradication actions Targets Transbiblica
  62. 62. Hunger • Globally, one in nine people in the world today (795 million) are undernourished • The vast majority of the world’s hungry people live in developing countries, where 12.9 per cent of the population is undernourished. • Asia is the continent with the most hungry people – two thirds of the total. The percentage in southern Asia has fallen in recent years but in western Asia it has increased slightly. • Southern Asia faces the greatest hunger burden, with about 281 million undernourished people. In sub-Saharan Africa, projections for the 2014-2016 period indicate a rate of undernourishment of almost 23 per cent. • Poor nutrition causes nearly half (45 per cent) of deaths in children under five – 3.1 million children each year. • One in four of the world’s children suffer stunted growth. In developing countries the proportion can rise to one in three. • 66 million primary school-age children attend classes hungry across the developing world, with 23 million in Africa alone. Food security • Agriculture is the single largest employer in the world, providing livelihoods for 40 per cent of today’s global population. It is the largest source of income and jobs for poor rural households. • 500 million small farms worldwide, most still rainfed, provide up to 80 per cent of food consumed in a large part of the developing world. Investing in smallholder women and men is an important way to increase food security and nutrition for the poorest, as well as food production for local and global markets. • Since the 1900s, some 75 per cent of crop diversity has been lost from farmers’ fields. Better use of agricultural biodiversity can contribute to more nutritious diets, enhanced livelihoods for farming communities and more resilient and sustainable farming systems. • If women farmers had the same access to resources as men, the number of hungry in the world could be reduced by up to 150 million. • 1.4 billion people have no access to electricity worldwide – most of whom live in rural areas of the developing world. Energy poverty in many regions is a fundamental barrier to reducing hunger and ensuring that the world can produce enough food to meet future demand. Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  63. 63. • By 2030, end hunger and ensure access by all people, in particular the poor and people in vulnerable situations, including infants, to safe, nutritious and sufficient food all year round • By 2030, end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving, by 2025, the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under 5 years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women and older persons • By 2030, double the agricultural productivity and incomes of small-scale food producers, in particular women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment • By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality • By 2020, maintain the genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants and farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at the national, regional and international levels, and promote access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge, as internationally agreed • Increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development and plant and livestock gene banks in order to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular least developed countries • Correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets, including through the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round • Adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility Targets Transbiblica
  64. 64. Child health • 17,000 fewer children die each day than in 1990, but more than six million children still die before their fifth birthday each year • Since 2000, measles vaccines have averted nearly 15.6 million deaths • Despite determined global progress, an increasing proportion of child deaths are in sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia. Four out of every five deaths of children under age five occur in these regions. • Children born into poverty are almost twice as likely to die before the age of five as those from wealthier families. • Children of educated mothers—even mothers with only primary schooling—are more likely to survive than children of mothers with no education. Maternal health • Maternal mortality has fallen by almost 50 per cent since 1990 • In Eastern Asia, Northern Africa and Southern Asia, maternal mortality has declined by around two-thirds • But maternal mortality ratio – the proportion of mothers that do not survive childbirth compared to those who do – in developing regions is still 14 times higher than in the developed regions • More women are receiving antenatal care. In developing regions, antenatal care increased from 65 per cent in 1990 to 83 per cent in 2012 • Only half of women in developing regions receive the recommended amount of health care they need • Fewer teens are having children in most developing regions, but progress has slowed. The large increase in contraceptive use in the 1990s was not matched in the 2000s • The need for family planning is slowly being met for more women, but demand is increasing at a rapid pace Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  65. 65. HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases • At the end of 2014, there were 13.6 million people accessing antiretroviral therapy • New HIV infections in 2013 were estimated at 2.1 million, which was 38 per cent lower than in 2001 • At the end of 2013, there were an estimated 35 million people living with HIV • At the end of 2013, 240 000 children were newly infected with HIV • New HIV infections among children have declined by 58 per cent since 2001 • Globally, adolescent girls and young women face gender-based inequalities, exclusion, discrimination and violence, which put them at increased risk of acquiring HIV • HIV is the leading cause of death for women of reproductive age worldwide • TB-related deaths in people living with HIV have fallen by 36% since 2004 • There were 250 000 new HIV infections among adolescents in 2013, two thirds of which were among adolescent girls • AIDS is now the leading cause of death among adolescents (aged 10–19) in Africa and the second most common cause of death among adolescents globally • In many settings, adolescent girls’ right to privacy and bodily autonomy is not respected, as many report that their first sexual experience was forced • As of 2013, 2.1 million adolescents were living with HIV • Over 6.2 million malaria deaths have been averted between 2000 and 2015, primarily of children under five years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. The global malaria incidence rate has fallen by an estimated 37 per cent and the morality rates by 58 per cent • Between 2000 and 2013, tuberculosis prevention, diagnosis and treatment interventions saved an estimated 37 million lives. The tuberculosis mortality rate fell by 45 per cent and the prevalence rate by 41 per cent between 1990 and 2013 Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  66. 66. • By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births • By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births and under-5 mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1,000 live births • By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases • By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being • Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol • By 2020, halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents 3.7 By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes • Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all • By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination • Strengthen the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in all countries, as appropriate • Support the research and development of vaccines and medicines for the communicable and noncommunicable diseases that primarily affect developing countries, provide access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines, in accordance with the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health, which affirms the right of developing countries to use to the full the provisions in the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights regarding flexibilities to protect public health, and, in particular, provide access to medicines for all • Substantially increase health financing and the recruitment, development, training and retention of the health workforce in developing countries, especially in least developed countries and small island developing States • Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks Targets Transbiblica
  67. 67. • Enrolment in primary education in developing countries has reached 91 per cent but 57 million children remain out of school • More than half of children that have not enrolled in school live in sub-Saharan Africa • An estimated 50 per cent of out-of-school children of primary school age live in conflict-affected areas • 103 million youth worldwide lack basic literacy skills, and more than 60 per cent of them are women Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  68. 68. • By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and Goal-4 effective learning outcomes • By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and preprimary education so that they are ready for primary education • By 2030, ensure equal access for all women and men to affordable and quality technical, vocational and tertiary education, including university • By 2030, substantially increase the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills, including technical and vocational skills, for employment, decent jobs and entrepreneurship • By 2030, eliminate gender disparities in education and ensure equal access to all levels of education and vocational training for the vulnerable, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples and children in vulnerable situations • By 2030, ensure that all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy • By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development • Build and upgrade education facilities that are child, disability and gender sensitive and provide safe, nonviolent, inclusive and effective learning environments for all • By 2020, substantially expand globally the number of scholarships available to developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and African countries, for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries • By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers, including through international cooperation for teacher training in developing countries, especially least developed countries and small island developing states Targets Transbiblica
  69. 69. • About two thirds of countries in the developing regions have achieved gender parity in primary education • In Southern Asia, only 74 girls were enrolled in primary school for every 100 boys in 1990. By 2012, the enrolment ratios were the same for girls as for boys. • In sub-Saharan Africa, Oceania and Western Asia, girls still face barriers to entering both primary and secondary school. • Women in Northern Africa hold less than one in five paid jobs in the non- agricultural sector. The proportion of women in paid employment outside the agriculture sector has increased from 35 per cent in 1990 to 41 per cent in 2015 • In 46 countries, women now hold more than 30 per cent of seats in national parliament in at least one chamber. Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  70. 70. • End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere • Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation • Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation • Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate • Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life • Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences • Undertake reforms to give women equal rights to economic resources, as well as access to ownership and control over land and other forms of property, financial services, inheritance and natural resources, in accordance with national laws • Enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology, to promote the empowerment of women • Adopt and strengthen sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels Targets Transbiblica
  71. 71. • 6 billion people have gained access to improved drinking water sources since 1990, but 663 million people are still without • At least 1.8 billion people globally use a source of drinking water that is fecally contaminated • Between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of the global population using an improved drinking water source has increased from 76 per cent to 91 per cent • But water scarcity affects more than 40 per cent of the global population and is projected to rise. Over 1.7 billion people are currently living in river basins where water use exceeds recharge • 4 billion people lack access to basic sanitation services, such as toilets or latrines • More than 80 per cent of wastewater resulting from human activities is discharged into rivers or sea without any pollution removal • Each day, nearly 1,000 children die due to preventable water and sanitation-related diseases • Hydropower is the most important and widely-used renewable source of energy and as of 2011, represented 16 per cent of total electricity production worldwide • Approximately 70 per cent of all water abstracted from rivers, lakes and aquifers is used for irrigation • Floods and other water-related disasters account for 70 per cent of all deaths related to natural disasters Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  72. 72. • By 2030, achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all • By 2030, achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations • By 2030, improve water quality by reducing pollution, eliminating dumping and minimizing release of hazardous chemicals and materials, halving the proportion of untreated wastewater and substantially increasing recycling and safe reuse globally • By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity • By 2030, implement integrated water resources management at all levels, including through transboundary cooperation as appropriate • By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes • By 2030, expand international cooperation and capacity-building support to developing countries in water- and sanitation-related activities and programmes, including water harvesting, desalination, water efficiency, wastewater treatment, recycling and reuse technologies • Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management Targets Transbiblica
  73. 73. • One in five people still lacks access to modern electricity • 3 billion people rely on wood, coal, charcoal or animal waste for cooking and heating • Energy is the dominant contributor to climate change, accounting for around 60 per cent of total global greenhouse gas emissions • Reducing the carbon intensity of energy is a key objective in long-term climate goals. Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  74. 74. • By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services • By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix • By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency • By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology • By 2030, expand infrastructure and upgrade technology for supplying modern and sustainable energy services for all in developing countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing States, and land-locked developing countries, in accordance with their respective programmes of support Targets Transbiblica
  75. 75. • Global unemployment increased from 170 million in 2007 to nearly 202 million in 2012, of which about 75 million are young women and men. • Nearly 2.2 billion people live below the US$2 poverty line and that poverty eradication is only possible through stable and well-paid jobs. • 470 million jobs are needed globally for new entrants to the labour market between 2016 and 2030. Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  76. 76. • Sustain per capita economic growth in accordance with national circumstances and, in particular, at least 7 per cent gross domestic product growth per annum in the least developed countries • Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors • Promote development-oriented policies that support productive activities, decent job creation, entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation, and encourage the formalization and growth of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, including through access to financial services • Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, with developed countries taking the lead • By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value • By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training • Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms • Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment • By 2030, devise and implement policies to promote sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products • Strengthen the capacity of domestic financial institutions to encourage and expand access to banking, insurance and financial services for all • Increase Aid for Trade support for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, including through the Enhanced Integrated Framework for Trade-Related Technical Assistance to Least Developed Countries • By 2020, develop and operationalize a global strategy for youth employment and implement the Global Jobs Pact of the International Labour Organization Targets Transbiblica
  77. 77. • Basic infrastructure like roads, information and communication technologies, sanitation, electrical power and water remains scarce in many developing countries • About 2.6 billion people in the developing world are facing difficulties in accessing electricity full time • 2.5 billion people worldwide lack access to basic sanitation and almost 800 million people lack access to water, many hundreds of millions of them in Sub Saharan Africa and South Asia • 1-1.5 million people do not have access to reliable phone services • Quality infrastructure is positively related to the achievement of social, economic and political goals • Inadequate infrastructure leads to a lack of access to markets, jobs, information and training, creating a major barrier to doing business • Undeveloped infrastructures limits access to health care and education • For many African countries, particularly the lower-income countries, the existent constraints regarding infrastructure affect firm productivity by around 40 per cent • Manufacturing is an important employer, accounting for around 470 million jobs worldwide in 2009 – or around 16 per cent of the world’s workforce of 2.9 billion. In 2013, it is estimated that there were more than half a billion jobs in manufacturing • Industrialization’s job multiplication effect has a positive impact on society. Every one job in manufacturing creates 2.2 jobs in other sectors • Small and medium-sized enterprises that engage in industrial processing and manufacturing are the most critical for the early stages of industrialization and are typically the largest job creators. They make up over 90 per cent of business worldwide and account for between 50-60 per cent of employment • In countries where data are available, the number of people employed in renewable energy sectors is presently around 2.3 million. Given the present gaps in information, this is no doubt a very conservative figure. Because of strong rising interest in energy alternatives, the possible total employment for renewables by 2030 is 20 million jobs • Least developed countries have immense potential for industrialization in food and beverages (agro-industry), and textiles and garments, with good prospects for sustained employment generation and higher productivity • Middle-income countries can benefit from entering the basic and fabricated metals industries, which offer a range of products facing rapidly growing international demand • In developing countries, barely 30 per cent of agricultural production undergoes industrial processing. In high-income countries, 98 per cent is processed. This suggests that there are great opportunities for developing countries in agribusiness Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  78. 78. • Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all • Promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and, by 2030, significantly raise industry’s share of employment and gross domestic product, in line with national circumstances, and double its share in least developed countries • Increase the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises, in particular in developing countries, to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets • By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities • Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending • Facilitate sustainable and resilient infrastructure development in developing countries through enhanced financial, technological and technical support to African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States 18 • Support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries, including by ensuring a conducive policy environment for, inter alia, industrial diversification and value addition to commodities • Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020 Targets Transbiblica
  79. 79. • On average—and taking into account population size—income inequality increased by 11 per cent in developing countries between 1990 and 2010 • A significant majority of households in developing countries—more than 75 per cent of the population— are living today in societies where income is more unequally distributed than it was in the 1990s • Evidence shows that, beyond a certain threshold, inequality harms growth and poverty reduction, the quality of relations in the public and political spheres and individuals’ sense of fulfilment and self-worth • There is nothing inevitable about growing income inequality; several countries have managed to contain or reduce income inequality while achieving strong growth performance • Income inequality cannot be effectively tackled unless the underlying inequality of opportunities is addressed • In a global survey conducted by UN Development Programme, policy makers from around the world acknowledged that inequality in their countries is generally high and potentially a threat to long-term social and economic development • Evidence from developing countries shows that children in the poorest 20 per cent of the populations are still up to three times more likely to die before their fifth birthday than children in the richest quintiles • Social protection has been significantly extended globally, yet persons with disabilities are up to five times more likely than average to incur catastrophic health expenditures • Despite overall declines in maternal mortality in the majority of developing countries, women in rural areas are still up to three times more likely to die while giving birth than women living in urban centres Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  80. 80. • By 2030, progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average • By 2030, empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status • Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard • Adopt policies, especially fiscal, wage and social protection policies, and progressively achieve greater equality • Improve the regulation and monitoring of global financial markets and institutions and strengthen the implementation of such regulations • Ensure enhanced representation and voice for developing countries in decision-making in global international economic and financial institutions in order to deliver more effective, credible, accountable and legitimate institutions • Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies • Implement the principle of special and differential treatment for developing countries, in particular least developed countries, in accordance with World Trade Organization agreements • Encourage official development assistance and financial flows, including foreign direct investment, to States where the need is greatest, in particular least developed countries, African countries, small island developing States and landlocked developing countries, in accordance with their national plans and programmes • By 2030, reduce to less than 3 per cent the transaction costs of migrant remittances and eliminate remittance corridors with costs higher than 5 per cent Targets Transbiblica
  81. 81. • Half of humanity – 3.5 billion people – lives in cities today • By 2030, almost 60 per cent of the world’s population will live in urban areas • 95 per cent of urban expansion in the next decades will take place in developing world • 828 million people live in slums today and the number keeps rising • The world’s cities occupy just 3 per cent of the Earth’s land, but account for 60-80 per cent of energy consumption and 75 per cent of carbon emissions • Rapid urbanization is exerting pressure on fresh water supplies, sewage, the living environment, and public health • But the high density of cities can bring efficiency gains and technological innovation while reducing resource and energy consumption Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  82. 82. • By 2030, ensure access for all to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services and upgrade slums • By 2030, provide access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems for all, improving road safety, notably by expanding public transport, with special attention to the needs of those in vulnerable situations, women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons • By 2030, enhance inclusive and sustainable urbanization and capacity for participatory, integrated and sustainable human settlement planning and management in all countries • Strengthen efforts to protect and safeguard the world’s cultural and natural heritage • By 2030, significantly reduce the number of deaths and the number of people affected and substantially decrease the direct economic losses relative to global gross domestic product caused by disasters, including water-related disasters, with a focus on protecting the poor and people in vulnerable situations • By 2030, reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality and municipal and other waste management • By 2030, provide universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible, green and public spaces, in particular for women and children, older persons and persons with disabilities • Support positive economic, social and environmental links between urban, peri-urban and rural areas by strengthening national and regional development planning • By 2020, substantially increase the number of cities and human settlements adopting and implementing integrated policies and plans towards inclusion, resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters, and develop and implement, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, holistic disaster risk management at all levels • Support least developed countries, including through financial and technical assistance, in building sustainable and resilient buildings utilizing local materials Targets Transbiblica
  83. 83. • Each year, an estimated one third of all food produced – equivalent to 1.3 billion tonnes worth around $1 trillion – ends up rotting in the bins of consumers and retailers, or spoiling due to poor transportation and harvesting practices • If people worldwide switched to energy efficient lightbulbs the world would save US$120 billion annually • Should the global population reach 9.6 billion by 2050, the equivalent of almost three planets could be required to provide the natural resources needed to sustain current lifestyles Water • Less than 3 per cent of the world’s water is fresh (drinkable), of which 2.5 per cent is frozen in the Antarctica, Arctic and glaciers. Humanity must therefore rely on 0.5 per cent for all of man’s ecosystem’s and fresh water needs. • Man is polluting water faster than nature can recycle and purify water in rivers and lakes. • More than 1 billion people still do not have access to fresh water. • Excessive use of water contributes to the global water stress. • Water is free from nature but the infrastructure needed to deliver it is expensive. Energy • Despite technological advances that have promoted energy efficiency gains, energy use in OECD countries will continue to grow another 35 per cent by 2020. Commercial and residential energy use is the second most rapidly growing area of global energy use after transport. • In 2002 the motor vehicle stock in OECD countries was 550 million vehicles (75 per cent of which were personal cars). A 32 per cent increase in vehicle ownership is expected by 2020. At the same time, motor vehicle kilometres are projected to increase by 40 per cent and global air travel is projected to triple in the same period. • Households consume 29 per cent of global energy and consequently contribute to 21 per cent of resultant CO2 emissions. • One-fifth of the world’s final energy consumption in 2013 was from renewables. Food • While substantial environmental impacts from food occur in the production phase (agriculture, food processing), households influence these impacts through their dietary choices and habits. This consequently affects the environment through food-related energy consumption and waste generation. • 3 billion tonnes of food is wasted every year while almost 1 billion people go undernourished and another 1 billion hungry. • Overconsumption of food is detrimental to our health and the environment. • 5 billion people globally are overweight or obese. • Land degradation, declining soil fertility, unsustainable water use, overfishing and marine environment degradation are all lessening the ability of the natural resource base to supply food. • The food sector accounts for around 30 per cent of the world’s total energy consumption and accounts for around 22 per cent of total Greenhouse Gas emissions. Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  84. 84. • Implement the 10-year framework of programmes on sustainable consumption and production, all countries taking action, with developed countries taking the lead, taking into account the development and capabilities of developing countries • By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources • By 2030, halve per capita global food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains, including post-harvest losses • By 2020, achieve the environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle, in accordance with agreed international frameworks, and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil in order to minimize their adverse impacts on human health and the environment • By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse • Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies, to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle • Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities • By 2030, ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature • Support developing countries to strengthen their scientific and technological capacity to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production • Develop and implement tools to monitor sustainable development impacts for sustainable tourism that creates jobs and promotes local culture and products • Rationalize inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies that encourage wasteful consumption by removing market distortions, in accordance with national circumstances, including by restructuring taxation and phasing out those harmful subsidies, where they exist, to reflect their environmental impacts, taking fully into account the specific needs and conditions of developing countries and minimizing the possible adverse impacts on their development in a manner that protects the poor and the affected communities Targets Transbiblica
  85. 85. • Thanks to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change we know: • From 1880 to 2012, average global temperature increased by 0.85°C. To put this into perspective, for each 1 degree of temperature increase, grain yields decline by about 5 per cent. Maize, wheat and other major crops have experienced significant yield reductions at the global level of 40 megatonnes per year between 1981 and 2002 due to a warmer climate. • Oceans have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished and sea level has risen.From 1901 to 2010, the global average sea level rose by 19 cm as oceans expanded due to warming and ice melted. The Arctic’s sea ice extent has shrunk in every successive decade since 1979, with 1.07 million km² of ice loss every decade • Given current concentrations and on-going emissions of greenhouse gases, it is likely that by the end of this century, the increase in global temperature will exceed 1.5°C compared to 1850 to 1900 for all but one scenario. The world’s oceans will warm and ice melt will continue. Average sea level rise is predicted as 24 – 30cm by 2065 and 40-63cm by 2100. Most aspects of climate change will persist for many centuries even if emissions are stopped • Global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) have increased by almost 50 per cent since 1990 • Emissions grew more quickly between 2000 and 2010 than in each of the three previous decades • It is still possible, using a wide array of technological measures and changes in behaviour, to limit the increase in global mean temperature to two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels • Major institutional and technological change will give a better than even chance that global warming will not exceed this threshold Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  86. 86. • Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries • Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning • Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning • Implement the commitment undertaken by developed-country parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to a goal of mobilizing jointly $100 billion annually by 2020 from all sources to address the needs of developing countries in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation and fully operationalize the Green Climate Fund through its capitalization as soon as possible • Promote mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in least developed countries and small island developing States, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities • * Acknowledging that the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is the primary international, intergovernmental forum for negotiating the global response to climate change. Targets Transbiblica
  87. 87. • Oceans cover three quarters of the Earth’s surface, contain 97 per cent of the Earth’s water, and represent 99 per cent of the living space on the planet by volume • Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods • Globally, the market value of marine and coastal resources and industries is estimated at $3 trillion per year or about 5 per cent of global GDP • Oceans contain nearly 200,000 identified species, but actual numbers may lie in the millions • Oceans absorb about 30 per cent of carbon dioxide produced by humans, buffering the impacts of global warming • Oceans serve as the world’s largest source of protein, with more than 3 billion people depending on the oceans as their primary source of protein • Marine fisheries directly or indirectly employ over 200 million people • Subsidies for fishing are contributing to the rapid depletion of many fish species and are preventing efforts to save and restore global fisheries and related jobs, causing ocean fisheries to generate US$ 50 billion less per year than they could • As much as 40 per cent of the world oceans are heavily affected by human activities, including pollution, depleted fisheries, and loss of coastal habitats Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  88. 88. • By 2025, prevent and significantly reduce marine pollution of all kinds, in particular from land-based activities, including marine debris and nutrient pollution • By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans • Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels • By 2020, effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans, in order to restore fish stocks in the shortest time feasible, at least to levels that can produce maximum sustainable yield as determined by their biological characteristics • By 2020, conserve at least 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information • By 2020, prohibit certain forms of fisheries subsidies which contribute to overcapacity and overfishing, eliminate subsidies that contribute to illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and refrain from introducing new such subsidies, recognizing that appropriate and effective special and differential treatment for developing and least developed countries should be an integral part of the World Trade Organization fisheries subsidies negotiation • By 2030, increase the economic benefits to Small Island developing States and least developed countries from the sustainable use of marine resources, including through sustainable management of fisheries, aquaculture and tourism • Increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology, taking into account the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology, in order to improve ocean health and to enhance the contribution of marine biodiversity to the development of developing countries, in particular small island developing States and least developed countries • Provide access for small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets • Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in UNCLOS, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of The Future We Want Targets Transbiblica
  89. 89. Forests • Around 1.6 billion people depend on forests for their livelihood. This includes some 70 million indigenous people • Forests are home to more than 80 per cent of all terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects Desertification • 2.6 billion people depend directly on agriculture, but 52 per cent of the land used for agriculture is moderately or severely affected by soil degradation • As of 2008, land degradation affected 1.5 billion people globally • Arable land loss is estimated at 30 to 35 times the historical rate • Due to drought and desertification each year 12 million hectares are lost (23 hectares per minute), where 20 million tons of grain could have been grown • 74 per cent of the poor are directly affected by land degradation globally Biodiversity • Of the 8,300 animal breeds known, 8 per cent are extinct and 22 per cent are at risk of extinction • Of the over 80,000 tree species, less than 1 per cent have been studied for potential use • Fish provide 20 per cent of animal protein to about 3 billion people. Only ten species provide about 30 per cent of marine capture fisheries and ten species provide about 50 per cent of aquaculture production • Over 80 per cent of the human diet is provided by plants. Only three cereal crops – rice, maize and wheat – provide 60 per cent of energy intake • As many as 80 per cent of people living in rural areas in developing countries rely on traditional plant--- based medicines for basic healthcare • Micro-organisms and invertebrates are key to ecosystem services, but their contributions are still poorly known and rarely acknowledged Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  90. 90. • By 2020, ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements • By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally • By 2030, combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, including land affected by desertification, drought and floods, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world • By 2030, ensure the conservation of mountain ecosystems, including their biodiversity, in order to enhance their capacity to provide benefits that are essential for sustainable development • Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species • Promote fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and promote appropriate access to such resources, as internationally agreed • Take urgent action to end poaching and trafficking of protected species of flora and fauna and address both demand and supply of illegal wildlife products • By 2020, introduce measures to prevent the introduction and significantly reduce the impact of invasive alien species on land and water ecosystems and control or eradicate the priority species • By 2020, integrate ecosystem and biodiversity values into national and local planning, development processes, poverty reduction strategies and accounts • Mobilize and significantly increase financial resources from all sources to conserve and sustainably use biodiversity and ecosystems • Mobilize significant resources from all sources and at all levels to finance sustainable forest management and provide adequate incentives to developing countries to advance such management, including for conservation and reforestation • Enhance global support for efforts to combat poaching and trafficking of protected species, including by increasing the capacity of local communities to pursue sustainable livelihood opportunities Targets Transbiblica
  91. 91. • Among the institutions most affected by corruption are the judiciary and police • Corruption, bribery, theft and tax evasion cost some US $1.26 trillion for developing countries per year; this amount of money could be used to lift those who are living on less than $1.25 a day above $1.25 for at least six years • The rate of children leaving primary school in conflict affected countries reached 50 per cent in 2011, which accounts to 28.5 million children, showing the impact of unstable societies on one of the major goals of the post 2015 agenda: education. • The rule of law and development have a significant interrelation and are mutually reinforcing, making it essential for sustainable development at the national and international level Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  92. 92. • Significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates everywhere • End abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against and torture of children • Promote the rule of law at the national and international levels and ensure equal access to justice for all • By 2030, significantly reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime • Substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms • Develop effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels • Ensure responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative decision-making at all levels • Broaden and strengthen the participation of developing countries in the institutions of global governance • By 2030, provide legal identity for all, including birth registration • Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements • Strengthen relevant national institutions, including through international cooperation, for building capacity at all levels, in particular in developing countries, to prevent violence and combat terrorism and crime • Promote and enforce non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development Targets Transbiblica
  93. 93. • Official development assistance stood at $135.2 billion in 2014, the highest level ever recorded • 79 per cent of imports from developing countries enter developed countries duty-free • The debt burden on developing countries remains stable at about 3 per cent of export revenue • The number of Internet users in Africa almost doubled in the past four years • 30 per cent of the world’s youth are digital natives, active online for at least five years • But more four billion people do not use the Internet, and 90 per cent of them are from the developing world Facts & Figures Transbiblica
  94. 94. Finance • Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection • Developed countries to implement fully their official development assistance commitments, including the commitment by many developed countries to achieve the target of 0.7 per cent of ODA/GNI to developing countries and 0.15 to 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries ODA providers are encouraged to consider setting a target to provide at least 0.20 per cent of ODA/GNI to least developed countries • Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources • Assist developing countries in attaining long-term debt sustainability through coordinated policies aimed at fostering debt financing, debt relief and debt restructuring, as appropriate, and address the external debt of highly indebted poor countries to reduce debt distress • Adopt and implement investment promotion regimes for least developed countries Technology • Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism • Promote the development, transfer, dissemination and diffusion of environmentally sound technologies to developing countries on favourable terms, including on concessional and preferential terms, as mutually agreed • Fully operationalize the technology bank and science, technology and innovation capacity-building mechanism for least developed countries by 2017 and enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology Capacity building • Enhance international support for implementing effective and targeted capacity-building in developing countries to support national plans to implement all the sustainable development goals, including through North-South, South-South and triangular cooperation Targets Transbiblica
  95. 95. Trade • Promote a universal, rules-based, open, non-discriminatory and equitable multilateral trading system under the World Trade Organization, including through the conclusion of negotiations under its Doha Development Agenda • Significantly increase the exports of developing countries, in particular with a view to doubling the least developed countries’ share of global exports by 2020 • Realize timely implementation of duty-free and quota-free market access on a lasting basis for all least developed countries, consistent with World Trade Organization decisions, including by ensuring that preferential rules of origin applicable to imports from least developed countries are transparent and simple, and contribute to facilitating market access Systemic issues • Policy and institutional coherence • Enhance global macroeconomic stability, including through policy coordination and policy coherence • Enhance policy coherence for sustainable development • Respect each country’s policy space and leadership to establish and implement policies for poverty eradication and sustainable development • Multi-stakeholder partnerships • Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries • Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships • Data, monitoring and accountability • By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts • By 2030, build on existing initiatives to develop measurements of progress on sustainable development that complement gross domestic product, and support statistical capacity-building in developing countries Targets Transbiblica
  96. 96. Levels of Maturity of Change Integration- Transition- Transformation • Level 1 • Level 2 • Level 3 • Level 4 • Change and No Change. Resistance to Change. Policy, Administrative and Derivative Change (CO2 tax, ETS, Accounting). Coal vs. Gas. Continued backroom lobbying • Full Integration of Renewables (clean-tech, energy conservations, smartness, etc.) in the Energy Architecture - but not with a system change. Retained regulations, ownership , revenue, tax and capital control structures • Transition to a New Energy Architecture and Newly shared socio-economic and corporate business models- also in international trade • Transformation of Economies and Societies. Eco-modernity and New human consciousness

Editor's Notes

  • Hello!
  • This first module, and simply put- consists of three parts.
    1st- The setting of the scene: The global change challenge and the energy future we find ourselves today in.
    2nd. I will take a moment to share some of the key milestones and highlights of the global efforts to come to a Sustainable Development Agenda post-2015, including Climate Change Safety agreements.
    3rd. I will take a little time to wrap-up but also to re-iterate and share the key focus and journey in this lecture series: Our Leadership over the Energy Architectures –as it develops.
  • And that brings me to the extra-ordinary lecture series of Prof. Jeffrey Sachs: The Age of Sustainable Development
    "The Age of Sustainable Development" gives students an understanding of the key challenges and pathways to sustainable development - that is, economic development that is also socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable.
    This open COURSERA course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of sustainable development, drawing on the most recent developments in the social, policy, and physical sciences. Sustainable development is the most urgent challenge facing humanity. The fundamental question is how the world economy can continue to develop in a way that is socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable. The course describes the complex interactions between the world economy and the Earth's physical environment. Ecological processes and constraints (climate, disease ecology, physical resources such as soils and energy sources, topography and transport conditions) significantly shape the patterns of economic development, demography, and wealth and poverty. At the same time, human activities (farming, land use, urbanization, demographic change, and energy use) change the physical environments, increasingly in dangerous ways. The course offers a broad overview of the key challenges and potential solutions to achieve sustainable development in the 21st century.
    https://www.coursera.org/course/susdev
    I suggest you register and learn.
  • Now- and if we look at the latest dashboard on our socio-economic and ecological dashboard of plant earth- then the aggregate of our human development looks seriously go-ing off-chart.
    The new and up-to-date Planetary dashboard, and presented at the latest World Economic Forum in Davos- shows- shows our “Great Acceleration” in human activity since 1950.
    Human activity, predominantly the global economic system, is now the prime driver of change in the Earth System (the sum of our planet's interacting physical, chemical, biological and human processes), according to a set of 24 global indicators, or “planetary dashboard”, published in the journal Anthropocene Review (16 January 2015).
    It is difficult to overestimate the scale and speed of change.
    ===
    In a single lifetime humanity has become a planetary-scale geological force,” says lead author Professor Will Steffen, who led the joint project between the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Press release |
    A decade on, IGBP in collaboration with the Stockholm Resilience Centre has reassessed and updated the Great Acceleration indicators, first published in the IGBP synthesis, Global Change and the Earth System in 2004.
    Paper
    The trajectory of the Anthropocene: The Great Acceleration (Anthropocene Review) 15 January 2015.
    Data download
    Great Acceleration data (excel 2007, 364.7 kB)
    When we first aggregated these datasets, we expected to see major changes but what surprised us was the timing. Almost all graphs show the same pattern. The most dramatic shifts have occurred since 1950. We can say that around 1950 was the start of the Great Acceleration,” said Professor Steffen, a researcher at the Australian National University and the Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The bulk of economic activity, and so too, for now, the lion’s share of consumption, remain largely within the OECD countries, which in 2010 accounted for about 74% of global GDP but only 18% of the global population. This points to the profound scale of global inequality, which distorts the distribution of the benefits of the Great Acceleration and confounds international efforts, for example climate agreements, to deal with its impacts on the Earth System. However, the paper shows that recently, global production, traditionally based within OECD countries, has shifted towards BRICS nations -- Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. Moreover, the mushrooming middle classes in BRICS nations are driving greater consumption here too.
     
    About one half of the global population now lives in urban areas and about third of the global population has completed the transition from agrarian to industrial societies. This shift is evident in several indicators. Most of the post-2000 rise in fertilizer consumption, paper production and motor vehicles has occurred in the non-OECD world.
     This new “planetary dashboard” highlights how the trajectories of Earth and human development are now lightly bound. The findings will be presented at this weeks World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, 21-24 January.
  • And let’s look at The Global Energy Challenge- as we today know and have come to see it.
    Our world is also under rapid construction and development, with new wealth and wealth distribution being created, every day, and in an unprecedented speed. Over the coming two to three decades some 3 billion people in Asia, Middle-East & Africa, Latin-America are expected to join the new global middle-class and are to enjoy the same consumption patterns in their homes, in their offices and in their transportation as in the OECD and upper middle class families in the emerging and developing nations.[1] By the mid of the century, we expect we will be living with 9 billion people- sharing one planet.
    As we look at the world of today- and tomorrow- we can see great political, economic, social- , technological , ecological and organizational shifts taking place in our society, in our economies and – well- in – the biosphere of our planet and in nature.
    In simple terms.
    You cannot have a thriving and vibrant economy, if you donot have a healthy and peaceful society – in well-being.
    And you cannot have a society – at peace, well-being and wealthy- if the nature system around it cannot support it.
    So in essence:
    Our coming decades is – by some UN experts such as jeffrey Sachs called the Age of Sustainable Development:
    ===
    Leadership over our economies, and in our industries such as the Energy sector- more and more is in need of a new balancing act: attuning corporate strategies, business innovation and organizational forms” with that of the ”dynamic contect change” and societal needs and realities they find themselvesin.
    In simple terms.
    You cannot have a thriving and vibrant economy, if you donot have a healthy and peaceful society – in well-being.
    And you cannot have a society – at peace, well-being and wealthy- if the nature system around it cannot support it.
    So in essence:
    Our coming decades is – by some UN experts such as jeffrey Sachs called the Age of Sustainable Development:
    Our key change challenge is to realize healthy and stable economies within healty, peaceful and vibrant societies- in respect of each other and in balance with nature.
    Nature needs to be sustainable as a supporting frame in order to maintain the rest.
    It’s that easy.
  • The question is: Can we energize ourselves safely and sustainably into this future world?
    From a 7 billion population towards a 9 billion global community
    From a 90 trillion USD to a 180-210 trillion USD
    From 225 boeq towards 500-750 boeeq- if nothing dramatically changes.
    And as today- and that is a fact – we have already ‘polluted” the earth atmosphere with over 400 ppm CO2 – enough for a prognosed 2 Degrees Celsius Global warming,. And in addition we have consumed and emitted in the first 15 years already all the carbon which was considered the safe budget for this century.
    Add to that the Great Acceleration and the many other planetary boundaries we are seemingly at ease are crossing…
    Now – how do are we to do this – and how are we go-ing from here?
    ===
    Energy is vital and essential to modern day life. In fact, the wealthier you become, the more energy you are likely to use. That feels logical. [2]
    Today, all activities on our planet are fuelled by a daily energy supply of 225 million barrels of oil equivalent (boe). Roughly 80% comes from oil, natural gas and coal (fossil fuels). It is expected that in 2050 the total amount of energy that needs be produced will amount to 750 million boe per day. This figure is based on a worldwide population growth of 50% in the coming 40 years, and a higher average level of energy consumption (5 kW per capita or 120 kWh per capita per day[3]). How can we deliver this large amount of energy in a clean manner?[4] How does the transition path to 50 terawatt look like?[5]
    The question is: Can we ënergize ourselves safely into this world? As today- and that is a fact - we already have ‘polluted” the earth atmosphere with over 400 ppm CO2 – enough for a prognosed 2 Degrees Celsius Global warming,. And in addition we have consumed and emitted in the first 15 years already all the carbon which was considered the safe budget for this century.
    So-
    Now, if all people on this planet by then were to consume fossil (oil, gas, coal) fuel energy in the same way as people presently do in the West and wealthy parts of the emerging nations, we will be in for trouble, as we would need Five planets (for as much as we can understand now) to find and produce these resources. And we will have surely exceeded an acceptable carbon emission levels- endangering our lives and species for decades, if not centuries to come.
    The present trend is exactly that.
    So, over the next decades, - in fact today and tomorrow- the energy industry will need to find answers to the challenge.
    And that is You & me!
    The clean-tech industry- the industry of renewable energy supply, smart energy infrastructures [6] and energy saving- will have to play a significant role, perhaps much larger than presently predicted or seen. But will the speed of developments and integration of the clean-tech industry and its innovations be in time for the market?
    How about the time needed in order to grow these solutions to scale, and to develop the capabilities into a reliable new energy infrastructure?
    How about the present strength and distribution of the existing resource base in the conventional coal, oil and gas resource system? Will the new frontier reserves such as shale oil and gas be sufficiently strong in order to balance the expected (rapid and steep) decline in the existing and large producing fields? Can (all of) these new frontier production reserves be actually produced- from an economic, ecological and societal point of view?
    So with this rise in complexity and uncertainties both on the demand side as well on the supply side of the world energy system, and in a socio-technical context,  we may expect the world energy system perhaps to run against triple-A limits (affordability, availability, acceptability) or may become unstable (price volatilities, market swings, security or unrest, etc.).
    [1] UN report, McKinsey report: The next 3 billion
    [2] See graph UNDP
    [3] 1boe = 1564 kilowatt-hours (kWh). Note that today’s energy consumption per capita is 2.3 kW or 55 kWh per day. There are big differences around the world (China: less than 2 kW; US: more than 11 kW).
    [4] BP 2030 Energy Future Report ( central source report for our study!)
    [5] Energy Future Project- Berkhout, de Ridder & Kamp
    [6] E.g. micro-grids, smart and supergrids
    [7] In this respect: oil and/or gas reserves
  • So- and in a nutshell- we are not sure about our near-to-mid term future.
    On Energy that is.
    And how it will serve our Economies and Societies and in relation to Nature.
    No one can. No one can be sure.
    No matter who you are in our Energy Sector, or what Professional expertise you carry- be it the CEO of one of the largest Oil & Gas Companies, the State Minister or Leader of a country, An economist in an Energy institute, watchdog or block- our future is uncertain.
    There are some serious black swans, red post signals and signs and un-clarities (in relation, in demand needs and supply reserves, in capacity and cost development, on sustainability, etc. etc.) which causes us to frown our eyebrows.
    And there are also some “very bright and light” examples –name it- white swans- which make me (or us) smile.
    Add them all together- and the simple truth is : we don’t know how it all adds-up.
    And that is already a good thing to know:
    To acknowledge that we donot know how our energy markets, and our world energy system- will behave over the next one to two decades.
    I can say this with some clear certainty- as I have had the pleasure and insight of the Best of the West and the Most of the East is willing and able to offer or share.
    So – our individual and collective approach to our Global Change Challenge- and Energy & Sustainabilty Challenge- does matter.
    It’s crucial.
    Therefore I am so excited about this special lecture series.
    To my mind:
    This gap in knowledge and this sure-certainty in some of the behaviours of the players in our world energy system- and thus the performance of our energy architectures on location – is a problem or change challenge which can ideally be solved best within the Brotherhood of Energy Professionals.
    We have two options:
    Either we continue to compete across the silo’s , the energy value chain- between countries and companies- and hold our own cards to our chest- or we elect to come to a better grasp to what needs doing: on location, in the regions and on aggregate.
    That’s is the focus of this special lecture series.
    How can we do that?
  • As the road on the discussions and dialogues on the planetary boundaries – at the highest political level- has been a bumpy and lengthy one.
    Well- it all started with the Visionary Project and Modelling work of the Club of Rome, back in the 60’s.
    It’s first report and publication was actually not at all that well received.
    In fact- the leading politicians and business man from and in that time, all fervent advocates of unconstrained economic growth- boo-boo’d the club members away , almost in oblivion- and depicted them as poor or bad news prophets….
    It was the work and careful leadership of Gro Brundtland, and ex Norwegian PM and the Rio Earth Summit which created new hopes and new inspiration that the United Leadership of the world, or the UN, would and could come to grasp with the finite planet- and the needs of it’s today’s people and future generations.
    The Rio Earth summit became and was generally felt (by politics and business community) as a success.
    The definition and development of the UN Millennium Goals and the UN capacity and capability program roll-out (e.g. end of poverty, child education, disease control, food for every person, etc. etc.) is and could be seen a showcase what a collective community and spirit of world leadership can achieve.
    However- the subsequent years of negotiations for an agreement on the planetary boundaries or climate became cumbersome. “Milestones” of Al Gore’s inconvenient Truth or the Copenhagen COP-15 made Climate Change initially Top of Agenda, but the failure to reach an agreement became also a sign of a world order in dynamic change, and a world order no longer aligned and attuned to the principles of the initial agreements.
    In fact, Rio+20, the conference in Brazil in 2012 – gave birth and signs of new political block battles between the Rich and the Poor, and the East and the West: OECD vs. BRICS, ChINdia and G77.
    Sustainability or Sustainable Development from now were no longer a case of environmental or ecological protection, only No- the fact of the matter is and was- and in the words of former President of China Mr. Hu : People and People development First.
    Sustainability and Sustainable development became more directly linked and related to the economies, the social development of the various member states.- and whereby the richer countries are to “give”’ more to the more “poorer’ nations.
    In addition- and as part of the Climate Change,Safety & Social Justice negotiations – finance became an important element in the negotiations – whereby again - the more richer nations needed “to speak” with more cash (money on the table) in order to alleviate, help and restore the damage done to the poorer or more vulnerable nations (e.g. Bangladesh, Small Island States).
    That brings us to 2015. Till today.
    Following the success of the Millenium Development Goals, Secretary Ban-Ki Moon and with the help of special advisor Jeffrey Sachs have embarked on a journey of the development of a new and very exciting “capacity and capability program for the world”,- a new landing on the moon mission- and for the years (decades) to come:
    The so-called post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals…
    And that process is going “remarkably smooth” between the relevant stakeholders in the community of nations.
    What is more open is…
    ===
    Let me quote some text here from there website:
    In April 1968, a small international group of professionals from the fields of diplomacy, industry, academia and civil society met at a quiet villa in Rome. Invited by Italian industrialist Aurelio Peccei and Scottish scientist Alexander King, they came together to discuss the dilemma of prevailing short-term thinking in international affairs and, in particular, the concerns regarding unlimited resource consumption in an increasingly interdependent world.
     
    ….
    The international effects of this publication in the fields of politics, economics and science are best described as a ‘Big Bang’: over night, the Club of Rome had demonstrated the contradiction of unlimited and unrestrained growth in material consumption in a world of clearly finite resources and had brought the issue to the top of the global agenda.
    End Quote- So much from this think-tank.
  • Clickable Presentation- directly to webcast of Cop21
  • And I just want to flag to you- one of the flagship projects within the UNSDSN organisation- the so-called Deep-decarbonization project.
    With an assembled scientific team- the organisation has and is going to look into every country, every energy architecture on this planet- and will propose pathways of how that economy, that country, that energy architecture will be able to come to a zero-emission infrastructure by 2050.
    Quite ambitious. But also actually quite needy- to bring to the attention.
    Now=- the study is still in the academic realms, and doesnot test itself against the forces and changes needed at policy makers, industry , economy or organizations in order to make it true.
    That’s the addition this lecture series bring to you.
    Our lecture series is about the pragmatics. About how we – the true energy professional- can start talking and walking the path of renewal.
    Of getting safe- and to stay out of trouble.
  • Now to bring about true and lasting Integration, Transition and Transformation in our Societies- we need Vision and we need the skills and possibilities to influence, agree, decide, organize and realize.
    ‘This influence’ can be done at a Global Level (think UN, G20, BRICS, OECD, Opec, IEA, IEF) – and this influence and realization can be on lower levels: in cities and in communities.
    The Energy Business community, especially the larger-scale energy companies, be it state -be it private or stock-listed- is where today’s realities are be-ing executed- and futures can be build.
    Overall- and across the globe- the energy business community are the shapers and builders of our energy future.
    Now in the X-factor of tomorrow- I see this Business community, the energy professionals so to speak- assuming a much larger role in the stewardship over the energy architecture development, as done generally today- securing sustainable development.
    The beauty is- that energy professionals around the globe are connected. Horizontally across the value chains and in each Sector (be it oil, coal, renewables).
    Now- if we aspire to rapidly accelerate and step-up our Vision on Building truly vibrant and Sustainable Societies- then I see that the leaders in and over these energy companies AND the energy professionals within these companies can open-up and zipper.
    To open-up and build the new bridges for our new realities- from local, regional and global- and collectively create a new elevated construct of energy architectures.
    To my mind- this is a crucial element in the post-2015 UN SDSN development goals – re-inveting our established frameworks and organisations- if we are to succeed in its mission and delivery.
  • Building Sustainable Comunities
    Let’s look at this Energy For All iniative – and let’s start to look at the bottom of the pyramide
    The poor and rural communities. How are we to progress sustainable communities and how are we to bring energy to these villages?
    I come with two examples. One from India and one from Pakistan. And I will speak on the one in Pakistan only.
    In Pakistan, led by Dr. Akhter Hameed Khan, some very innovative work has been done to develop knowledge systems to support and maintain sustainable communities.
    In brief this work has consisted of:
    Mapping of local infrastructures and experiences, land us practices and physical structures
    Linking the rural with the national or global d evelopments: The knowledge and social capital generated through this physical and social mapping process has been integrated with large government and corporate sector development plans under the UN framework
    And making better use of Local Youth is trained and employed for mapping, local dialogue and gainful employment. These young workers also build bridges between the community and outside world
    (Context)
    As a matter of fact, the process of globalization has also led to (the process of) commercialization of rural village – of the agricultural, pastoral and fishing and hunting communities.
    This process has- at times- been accompanied by a intrusion of the physical, social and knowledge space of isolated rural settlements.
    Consequently land use, management of e.g. forest and natural resources, and traditional energy and water use practices have changed to the detriment of local environment and livelihood.
    In numerous communities socially responsible professionals and civil society organizations have initiated the sustainable development process of developing a more local body of knowledge, tools and programs to restore ecological balance, mitigate climate change, improve natural resource management and introduce efficient energy management practices to strengthen community resilience.
    Maintaining and protecting tradition, and blending this with modernity there where best and needed: A new form of Eco-modernity – a new form of collaboration between the outside support and the internal community- on a micro rural scale.
    As such: a very subtle, human and community-friendly approach.
    Not judging by what we see “as poor”- but more looking with fresh eyes and listening ears to the needs and see and feel what can “be rich”.
    Locally – in the cultural tradition. Much more sensitive- and far less commercial driven
    But let me be clear.
    At the bottom of the pyramid- and in our global community- people need help. Without our help- these people are chanceless and suffer.
    To that end- all the frames and programs of Prof. Jeffrey Sachs and Kandeh Yumkella are creating deserve our utmost attention and support- whereever we can
    ===
    Scope of activities
    This approach has been used for holistic planning at local level and included themes relating to shelter, energy efficient houses, land, forest and natural resource use planning, water management, social forestry , sanitation and solid waste management. I have already depicted some of this work through my power point slides.
    ==
  • But the world is a busy place. And the world is under rapid construction.
    It was already back in 2002, that the UN started to note that the global population was rapidly migrating into urban area’s. In fact – massive urban area’s.
  • Year 2015 is and has been a Pivot Year in Energy Land
    At the end of 2015 -we have seen and  experienced the results of years’ of climate change negotiations : The adaptation of the Paris Agreement.
    In September of 2015,  the UN agreed to embark on a ground-breaking program of capacity and capability building in the realms of Sustainable Development.
    In both of these programs- Energy and the Energy Sector are crucial and vital element for it’s success.
    Stewardship over the Energy Architecture, Energy transition and Innovation [1] in a global-,  local- and corporate setting is  a new (and urgent) government and business leadership role to learn .
    IN addition:
    The world is craving for resources. Resource exploitation becomes ever more complex and costly. The future of resource exploitation complex and difficult to improve or innovate. How do we stay out of trouble in a world where everybody wants to win or live abundant- and in an industry sector which is reaching it’s limits of growth or is running towards scarcity or unsustainability?  And not forgetting all the concerns with human live, health (in consuming the product) and our natural environment (“the great acceleration“) .
    Well – that- and in a nutshell- is the Energy sector, today.
    In very simple terms- one could state that the Energy Sector – and over the coming 15-30 years has the following three objectives:
    Support the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
    Implement the Paris Agreement.
    Provide Energy to our Societies.
    So the Theme for Year 2016 is simple:
    How (best) can we organize ourselves in order to support and achieve the above objectives?
    How are we going to live together and provide energy to all people of this world – reliably, sustainably, affordable, and in harmony?
    Can we build Sustainable Societies for all?
    Stewardship over the Energy Architecture[1] in a global-,  local- and corporate setting is to our mind a new and urgent business leadership role.
    Energy For One World practice  focus is on the outlook and present workings of our world energy system- and how we can improve our individual and collective strategies,  decisions and action making on Energy Architecture (local, regional, and national) -for our Economies, Sustainability and Societal needs.
    The practice is directed towards the realization of systematic improvements in the local and global energy system and outlook. To enable partners to define and realize the opportunity space for business and government to succeed in the energy world of today and tomorrow.
    A key perspective is in our understanding that all nations and all people have a fundamental right for energy. In order to achieve this, and for a growing world population, we may want to improve on our local, regional and global energy system realizations.
    Energy For One world helps to develop a (local and relevant) strategy- balancing Energy with Economy, Society and Sustainability needs, and based on this strategy, on how to define and realize (business or national) opportunities.
    We have a global outreach and intelligence network – and partner with a range of very senior representatives and reputable seniors from Academics, Institutes, Energy Corporations and Consulting.
    ====
     
    EFOW practice focus simple:
    Our practice approach is simple and mild  :  helping our customers to organize the system changes needed  (energy transition) and integrate the Paris Agreement, UN sustainable development agenda in the better energy architecture, transition and innovation developments.
    As no other- we understand that every Nation and every company has his own history, culture and natural needs for progression.
    If you want to read more on our working approach and considerations:
    Go an read our working practice contributions to Energy Architecture and the Sustainable Development Goals: Lets Get Started!
    We are proud to announce Four Practice Services specifically focused on Energy Transition and integrating the UN Sustainable Development goals into the Mainstream Energy Sector:
    Executive Energy Education and Outreach
     Speaking Engagements and Advise
    Performance Platforms (Example India)
    Teams (Example Mexico)
     
  • Saint Francis: Poverty and the Environment (4th October)
    Peace and All Good
    Canticle of Creation. A Franciscan Prayer
  • Year 2015 is and has been a Pivot Year in Energy Land
    At the end of 2015 -we have seen and  experienced the results of years’ of climate change negotiations : The adaptation of the Paris Agreement.
    In September of 2015,  the UN agreed to embark on a ground-breaking program of capacity and capability building in the realms of Sustainable Development.
    In both of these programs- Energy and the Energy Sector are crucial and vital element for it’s success.
    Stewardship over the Energy Architecture, Energy transition and Innovation [1] in a global-,  local- and corporate setting is  a new (and urgent) government and business leadership role to learn .
    IN addition:
    The world is craving for resources. Resource exploitation becomes ever more complex and costly. The future of resource exploitation complex and difficult to improve or innovate. How do we stay out of trouble in a world where everybody wants to win or live abundant- and in an industry sector which is reaching it’s limits of growth or is running towards scarcity or unsustainability?  And not forgetting all the concerns with human live, health (in consuming the product) and our natural environment (“the great acceleration“) .
    Well – that- and in a nutshell- is the Energy sector, today.
    In very simple terms- one could state that the Energy Sector – and over the coming 15-30 years has the following three objectives:
    Support the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
    Implement the Paris Agreement.
    Provide Energy to our Societies.
    So the Theme for Year 2016 is simple:
    How (best) can we organize ourselves in order to support and achieve the above objectives?
    How are we going to live together and provide energy to all people of this world – reliably, sustainably, affordable, and in harmony?
    Can we build Sustainable Societies for all?
    Stewardship over the Energy Architecture[1] in a global-,  local- and corporate setting is to our mind a new and urgent business leadership role.
    Energy For One World practice  focus is on the outlook and present workings of our world energy system- and how we can improve our individual and collective strategies,  decisions and action making on Energy Architecture (local, regional, and national) -for our Economies, Sustainability and Societal needs.
    The practice is directed towards the realization of systematic improvements in the local and global energy system and outlook. To enable partners to define and realize the opportunity space for business and government to succeed in the energy world of today and tomorrow.
    A key perspective is in our understanding that all nations and all people have a fundamental right for energy. In order to achieve this, and for a growing world population, we may want to improve on our local, regional and global energy system realizations.
    Energy For One world helps to develop a (local and relevant) strategy- balancing Energy with Economy, Society and Sustainability needs, and based on this strategy, on how to define and realize (business or national) opportunities.
    We have a global outreach and intelligence network – and partner with a range of very senior representatives and reputable seniors from Academics, Institutes, Energy Corporations and Consulting.
    ====
     
    EFOW practice focus simple:
    Our practice approach is simple and mild  :  helping our customers to organize the system changes needed  (energy transition) and integrate the Paris Agreement, UN sustainable development agenda in the better energy architecture, transition and innovation developments.
    As no other- we understand that every Nation and every company has his own history, culture and natural needs for progression.
    If you want to read more on our working approach and considerations:
    Go an read our working practice contributions to Energy Architecture and the Sustainable Development Goals: Lets Get Started!
    We are proud to announce Four Practice Services specifically focused on Energy Transition and integrating the UN Sustainable Development goals into the Mainstream Energy Sector:
    Executive Energy Education and Outreach
     Speaking Engagements and Advise
    Performance Platforms (Example India)
    Teams (Example Mexico)
     
  • Now- and as I have walked this path now for a while, and where-ever I had a conversation with people above this global energy change challenge- I received a variety of perspectives on the challenge.
    We live in One World- but we do have a wide variety of local and personal needs- and we do live in a world with very many and different views or awarenesses.
    So- the first thing we may realize when we address the issues is that there is and will be no single one answer to the problem.
    First and foremost- the problem is perceived differently by different people around the globe. And as the problem (or needs) are perceived different, so are the answers and solutions…
    I have attached in the handout a recent article from
    In a most recent article in the New York Times from Andrew Revin with the working title Can Humanity’s ‘Great Acceleration’ Be Managed and,
    If So, How?
    I share you some similar observations and insights in my working practice- and which we are working with:
    We need to understand the Global AND Local- in order to make good and proper (energy) decisions on locations– balancing Social needs, with Economy and Sustainability.
    And Vica versa.
    The aggregate of all the local needs and deeds should be somehow be overlooked- and guided.- especially on Energy & Sustainability.
    In the words of Andrew Revin:
    Ultimately, there will need to be an institution (or institutions) operating, with authority, above the level of individual countries to ensure that the planetary boundaries are respected. In effect, such an institution, acting on behalf of humanity as a whole, would be the ultimate arbiter of the myriad trade-offs that need to be managed as nations and groups of people jockey for economic and social advantage. It would, in essence, become the global referee on the planetary playing field.
    ===
    Go to press release from Planetary dashboard shows “Great Acceleration” in human activity since 1950Human activity, predominantly the global economic system, is now the prime driver of change in the Earth System (the sum of our planet's interacting physical, chemical, biological and human processes), according to a set of 24 global indicators, or “planetary dashboard”, published in the journal Anthropocene Review (16 January 2015).
    Go to article from Andrew Revin:
    http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01/15/can-humanitys-great-acceleration-be-managed-and-if-so-how/?_r=1
    IN this article we can read the following words-:
    Even without specifying exact global boundaries, global metrics can be highly misleading for policy. For example, with nitrogen, where the majority of human emissions come from synthetic fertilizers, the real-world challenge is to apply just the right amount of nitrogen to optimize crop yields while minimizing nitrogen losses that harm aquatic ecosystems. Reducing fertilizer application in Africa might seem beneficial globally, yet the result in this region would be even poorer crop yields without any notable reduction in nitrogen pollution; Africa’s fertilizer use is already suboptimal for crop yields. What can look like a good or a bad thing globally can prove exactly the opposite when viewed regionally and locally. What use is a global indicator for a local issue? As in real estate, location is everything.
    Finally, and most importantly, the planetary boundaries are burdened not only with major uncertainties and weak scientific theory – they are also politically problematic. Real world environmental challenges like nitrogen pollution, freshwater consumption and land-use change are ultimately a matter of politics, in the sense that there are losers and winners, and solutions have to be negotiated among many stakeholders. The idea of a scientific expert group determining top-down global limits on these activities and processes ignores these inevitable trade-offs and seems to preclude democratic resolution of these questions. It has been argued that (Steffen et al 2011):
    Ultimately, there will need to be an institution (or institutions) operating, with authority, above the level of individual countries to ensure that the planetary boundaries are respected. In effect, such an institution, acting on behalf of humanity as a whole, would be the ultimate arbiter of the myriad trade-offs that need to be managed as nations and groups of people jockey for economic and social advantage. It would, in essence, become the global referee on the planetary playing field.
    Here the planetary boundaries framework reaches its logical conclusion with a political scenario that is as unlikely as it is unpalatable. There is no ultimate global authority to rule over humanity or the environment. Science has a tremendously important role to play in guiding environmental management, not as a decider, but as a resource for deliberative, evidence-based decision making by the public, policy makers, and interest groups on the challenges, trade-offs and possible courses of action in negotiating the environmental challenges of societal development (DeFries et al 2012). Proposing that science itself can define the global environmental limits of human development is simultaneously unrealistic, hubristic, and a strategy doomed to fail.
  • Now I would like to progress with a couple of typical “belief-sets” of people, countries, businesses and communities around the globe..
    ON our future, and on our best ways – the strategies- forwards in this future.
    Let’s start with the more conservative and the more natural class of eco-conscious. Say- the people advocating ecology and people who are deeply connected with the Climate Change agenda.
    They see our global change challenge as one whereby we, human civilisation, will and are to find some moderation in our lifestyles, consumption patterns, our place in life ( or in nature) and acknowledge perhaps again the importance of being more in harmony with nature.
    IN this lifestyle and perspective, policies to regulate cities and industries to a zero emission regime and to improve the lifecylce analysis of products and services in order to boost sustainability are the new normal.
    This is the outlook whereby much of humanity problem is solved by raising the awareness and perspective on nature…
  • Another form of looking at the challenge, is to hail today’s abilities to connect. This is the world where everybody connects with everybody- and global problems are solved – on the fly- by accessing a global community of knowledge, know-how and can-do.
    In addition- and thanks to this more open and free lifestyle- we will see the rise of sharing. Sharing of goods and services- making room for community thinking and less individualism. Ownership of cars, houses and jobs becomes much less relevant. This is a world of diversity and inclusiveness and as such- available energy will be shared in an equal and fair way..
  • People who hold free-markets as the solution to most of our today’s challenges are the people who believe in shared capitalism, If we are able to extend the free market forces over the world, and over the market sectors which needs solutions, such as energy, housing, water, education, health, etc,.- we will see, gradually and over time, the rise of people and nations.
    We will see the freedom, creativity and in-ge-nuity of entrepreneurship shine and deliver the solutions the market asks or screams for…
    The US has done it. Europe has done it. Look at the difference between South and North Korea…
    IN this world view- Schumpeter and share-holder ownership are King. New resilience will be born in times of crisis. Look at the great depression. Look at the second world war, Look at the financial crisis. Are’nt we back in business?
    In this world view, and nevertheless all the good words and works- it still will be true that those not fit for the fight or plight- will loose out. And is also true that those who can play best, will earn best…
  • The world of tomorrow can also continue to be shaped by what Machiavelly once wrote- now some centuries ago:
    The world is and still will be run by power.
    Decision making Power over the people, the businesses and nations.
    IN this perspective- people, businesses and nations- are interlocked in an never ending tug of war, competition and comparison on leadership.
    It’s just in the nature of man – to rule.
    Rule over the self, and rule over people and nations.
    As the world moves into this new decades of multi-plurarism in countries- we will see and experience the effects of this darwinistic behaviour: more and more above or below table power-play will become the norm.
    As nations get more and more interlocked in this power game, so get’s the energy challenge more and more locked into this tug of war.
    In addition, and as Globalisation leads to bigger enterprises and stronger governments- we may see and experience new interplays and leadership styles of survival: driven by the competition – everybody is driven to look and be strong… at times harsh.
  • And then- I shared this a little earlier- we have the Technology Optimist view:
    At times, a radical optimistic lifestyle and perspective is held by the people who belief in technology and in progress through science and technology.
    IN this perspective on the global change challenge- people see the accelerated advancement in labs with nano and quarks, and in our computing power the answer to our problems.
    Within 20-30 years from now, computers will be so smart that they can design and solve all or most of our today’s complex system problems. Be it in energy or in finance or politics…
    In other words: We don’t need to solve all these (planetary boundaries) or global problems now. Let’s be calm and build the computing power to help us to do so…
    IN this world fits the view that the energy challenge will be solved by exponential growth in solar, energy storage and renewables- and that in the end- say 30 years from now- we have passed the age of fossil fuels- and we are living in a world of abundant energy, available and free for all..
  • And finally- there is a perspective on the rise of a more conscious and shared leadership style. A leadership style which can transcend over own or own community needs and believes, and who can work, think and act from a global mind-set. Truly looking at complex situations from a detached, almost neutral position- and with the intent to best serve the whole.
    Making best use of positive psychology and hope.
    Whilst the above views are brief and just an example- and in no means intended to be conclusive- they can help us to better understand the situation we are in- and what stakeholder groups mind-maps can be.
    This is important for us to know.
    Perhaps it is relevant that before we address any problem, any complex situation- we may first better understand in what categories of perspectives our society and stakeholders are in today..
    MY expectation is: all of the above and perhaps more.
    So- our pathways need to find some form of resonance (or ring some hidden bells) in them all.
    And remember:
    Resistance to change falls when the benefits are made clear.
    So- our pathways forward need to be able to demonstrate the benefits to all stakeholders. Collectively and individually.
    We have to become true social artists…
    That’s quite a challenge!!

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