BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS A Review for Whitnall School District Employees Designed by  Sue Larson, RN Whitnall School District ...
Instructions <ul><li>Please review the following slide show and complete the second attachment as instructed per this webs...
OSHA Standard <ul><li>In 1991, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mandated that employers provide a ...
OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standard Requires: <ul><li>This standard covers all employers who require employees to perform du...
Infection  Control is  More Important Than Ever <ul><li>Current health issues remind us that we all need to remember the i...
Introduction <ul><li>This is a good yearly review of health and safety issues for everyone to use at school, home and in y...
Be Prepared <ul><li>Since we cannot avoid all who are infected, as we do not even know who they may be, we need to be prep...
What you need to be Prepared <ul><li>You will receive latex free bandages and gloves at the beginning of every school year...
Bloodborne Diseases <ul><li>B lood b orne  p athogens, or BBP’s, are microorganisms that are carried by human blood and ot...
BBP are Transmitted by: <ul><li>Exposure to another person’s body fluids to a mucous membrane – like eye, nose, mouth, or ...
BBP are  NOT  transmitted by:  <ul><li>Social contact:  such as </li></ul><ul><li>hugs or handshakes </li></ul><ul><li>Mos...
Hepatitis B <ul><li>Hepatitis B is an inflammatory liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) that results in liv...
Hepatitis B <ul><li>Hepatitis B can survive on a dried surface at room temperature for up to 7 days,  so surfaces with pot...
HIV <ul><li>The human immunodeficiency virus attacks the body’s immune system, causing the disease known as AIDS.  </li></...
Hepatitis C <ul><li>Hepatitis C virus causes inflammation of the liver.  </li></ul><ul><li>An estimated 3 million American...
UNIVERSAL or STANDARD PRECAUTIONS <ul><li>Universal or standard precaution requires that you consider every person, all bl...
UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS <ul><li>As you have just read many of the bloodborne pathogens will cause no obvious symptoms to tho...
Modes of Transmission Knowing the modes of transmission can be your first line of defense for protection from infection.  ...
Bloodborne Pathogens can cause infection by entering your body through: <ul><li>Open cuts and nicks, </li></ul><ul><li>Ski...
Special-Education Employee should take extra caution while working with severely disabled children.  <ul><li>Disabled chil...
Other Modes of Transmission <ul><li>Accidental Injury </li></ul><ul><li>There is potential for infection when the skin is ...
Indirect Transmission <ul><li>You can be infected indirectly by touching a contaminated object or surface and then transfe...
Exposure Control Plan <ul><li>OSHA requires every school to create a written Exposure Control Plan and make it available t...
REDUCE your RISK <ul><li>Always use Universal or Standard Precautions. </li></ul><ul><li>Wear gloves when handling blood a...
REDUCE your RISK <ul><li>Hand washing is the most important way to prevent the spread of communicable diseases.   </li></u...
Reduce your risks <ul><li>Do not drink, eat, smoke or apply cosmetics or lip balms or handle contact lenses in areas of po...
Also REDUCE your RISKS BY:  <ul><li>Call custodians for clean up.  They have been trained to clean infected areas appropri...
This will also reduce your risks <ul><li>Contaminated equipment should never be handled without gloves being worn.  </li><...
Post-Exposure <ul><li>If you have had an exposure, contact me and your  administrator within 24 hours. </li></ul><ul><li>A...
Conclusion <ul><li>As a school employee, you must be ready to react quickly and carefully to an emergency using Universal ...
Completion <ul><li>Please click on the second attachment and complete the test and include your name, school and position....
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Bloodborne Pathogen Presentation Updated 09 11 08

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Bloodborne Pathogen Presentation Updated 09 11 08

  1. 1. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS A Review for Whitnall School District Employees Designed by Sue Larson, RN Whitnall School District Nurse
  2. 2. Instructions <ul><li>Please review the following slide show and complete the second attachment as instructed per this website. </li></ul><ul><li>The test will be corrected via this website and </li></ul><ul><li>results will be given to me. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have any questions or concerns, I can be reached by e-mail or at the following extensions: </li></ul><ul><li>Sue Larson: 8509, 8809, 8659, 8909 </li></ul>
  3. 3. OSHA Standard <ul><li>In 1991, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mandated that employers provide a training about bloodborne pathogens. (HIV emerging as a major health threat at this time) </li></ul><ul><li>The OSHA standard outlines a method for you to substantially reduce your risk of contracting a bloodborne disease while on the job. </li></ul><ul><li>Anyone who can reasonably anticipate contact with blood or potentially infectious body fluids while at work is covered under this standard. </li></ul>
  4. 4. OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Standard Requires: <ul><li>This standard covers all employers who require employees to perform duties that may expose them to BBP </li></ul><ul><li>It requires a written exposure control plan. Our exposure plan is kept in the Office of the Principal at WMS, HCES, and in the Health Room WHS, EES, </li></ul><ul><li>It requires prevention equipment and procedures </li></ul><ul><li>It requires specific training and recordkeeping </li></ul>
  5. 5. Infection Control is More Important Than Ever <ul><li>Current health issues remind us that we all need to remember the importance of taking precautions, living a healthy lifestyle and using universal standards in every day life. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Outbreaks of E. Coli, MRSA </li></ul><ul><li>Overuse of and decreased effectiveness of antibiotics </li></ul><ul><li>Cold, flu outbreaks </li></ul><ul><li>Anthrax and possibility of other bio-terrorism. </li></ul><ul><li>Increased spread of HIV and Hepatitis B </li></ul>
  6. 6. Introduction <ul><li>This is a good yearly review of health and safety issues for everyone to use at school, home and in your everyday life. </li></ul><ul><li>The procedures in the training are important in preventing disease transmission and are good general health rules to </li></ul><ul><li>live by. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Be Prepared <ul><li>Since we cannot avoid all who are infected, as we do not even know who they may be, we need to be prepared and use Universal Precautions or Standards at all times. </li></ul><ul><li>It is critical that all school professionals plan a safe response to children in need, including high risk children, as in special education. </li></ul><ul><li>Whether on the playground, in the gym or in a lab, all employees must know how they will handle a situations in which there may be contact with blood, or body fluids. </li></ul>
  8. 8. What you need to be Prepared <ul><li>You will receive latex free bandages and gloves at the beginning of every school year. </li></ul><ul><li>Additional supplies can be obtained throughout the school year in the school health room. We use only non-latex gloves. We require that all gloves used on students or fellow employees be non-latex. You may ask custodians for non-latex gloves also. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Bloodborne Diseases <ul><li>B lood b orne p athogens, or BBP’s, are microorganisms that are carried by human blood and other body fluids that cause disease. </li></ul><ul><li>Bloodborne pathogens may be present in blood, body fluids containing visible blood, vomit, semen and vaginal secretions and torn or loose skin. </li></ul><ul><li>The most common bloodborne pathogens are </li></ul><ul><li>HIV-the virus that causes aids. </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis B = HBV </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis C = HCV </li></ul>
  10. 10. BBP are Transmitted by: <ul><li>Exposure to another person’s body fluids to a mucous membrane – like eye, nose, mouth, or any break in the skin. </li></ul><ul><li>Needle sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual contact </li></ul><ul><li>Blood transfusions before 1982 </li></ul><ul><li>Mother to child during delivery. </li></ul>
  11. 11. BBP are NOT transmitted by: <ul><li>Social contact: such as </li></ul><ul><li>hugs or handshakes </li></ul><ul><li>Mosquitoes </li></ul><ul><li>Animal Bites </li></ul>
  12. 12. Hepatitis B <ul><li>Hepatitis B is an inflammatory liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) that results in liver cell damage. This damage can lead to scarring of the liver, cirrhosis, and increased risk of liver cancer in some people. </li></ul><ul><li>Many people with acute hepatitis B have no symptoms at all, or the symptoms may be very mild and flu-like. These symptoms include loss of appetite, nausea, fatigue, muscle or joint aches, mild fever and a few patients may become jaundiced. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Hepatitis B <ul><li>Hepatitis B can survive on a dried surface at room temperature for up to 7 days, so surfaces with potential infection need to be appropriately cleaned. Custodial Staff is trained for this. </li></ul><ul><li>The only way to know for sure if you have been infected with HBV is to have a specific blood test for hepatitis B. The test may not show positive during the incubation period – 45-180 days before symptoms. </li></ul>
  14. 14. HIV <ul><li>The human immunodeficiency virus attacks the body’s immune system, causing the disease known as AIDS. </li></ul><ul><li>Not everyone infected has symptoms immediately </li></ul><ul><li>The virus can be present for several years before symptoms appear. </li></ul><ul><li>Symptoms that may occur include: flu-like symptoms, such as fever, diarrhea and fatigue. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no vaccine present to prevent AIDS. </li></ul><ul><li>This virus will not survive very long on a surface. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Hepatitis C <ul><li>Hepatitis C virus causes inflammation of the liver. </li></ul><ul><li>An estimated 3 million Americans are chronically infected, with up to 75% showing no signs or symptoms. </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis C is a very slowly progressing disease that may take 20-30 years to cause serious liver damage. </li></ul><ul><li>The virus is found in blood and is not spread by casual contact. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no vaccine for Hepatitis C, so prevention of contact with blood and body fluids are recommended. </li></ul>
  16. 16. UNIVERSAL or STANDARD PRECAUTIONS <ul><li>Universal or standard precaution requires that you consider every person, all blood and most bodily fluids to be potentially infectious. </li></ul>
  17. 17. UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS <ul><li>As you have just read many of the bloodborne pathogens will cause no obvious symptoms to those infected. This is why we must always use Universal Precautions. </li></ul><ul><li>Universal or Standard Precautions is the standard in which you must consider and treat any and all blood and body fluids as if they were potentially infectious. </li></ul><ul><li>This approach is critical because it is impossible to tell who is infected with HBV, HCV or HIV simply by appearances. We cannot avoid all who may be high risk. </li></ul><ul><li>Victims of BBP come from all age groups, every socioeconomic class, every state and territory, rural areas and inner cities. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Modes of Transmission Knowing the modes of transmission can be your first line of defense for protection from infection. <ul><li>HBV, HIV, HCV may be present in blood and other materials such as: </li></ul><ul><li>Body Fluids containing visible blood </li></ul><ul><li>Semen and vaginal secretions, </li></ul><ul><li>Torn or loose skin </li></ul>
  19. 19. Bloodborne Pathogens can cause infection by entering your body through: <ul><li>Open cuts and nicks, </li></ul><ul><li>Skin abrasions </li></ul><ul><li>Dermatitis </li></ul><ul><li>Acne </li></ul><ul><li>Mucous membranes of your mouth, eyes or nose. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Special-Education Employee should take extra caution while working with severely disabled children. <ul><li>Disabled children may be more: </li></ul><ul><li>Vulnerable to injury </li></ul><ul><li>Likely to have special medical needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Dependent on adults for personal care. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Other Modes of Transmission <ul><li>Accidental Injury </li></ul><ul><li>There is potential for infection when the skin is cut by any of the following contaminated items: </li></ul><ul><li>Broken glass, Sharp metal, needles, knives, exposed ends of orthodontic wires. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Indirect Transmission <ul><li>You can be infected indirectly by touching a contaminated object or surface and then transfer the infection to your: mouth, eyes, nose, or break in the skin. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Exposure Control Plan <ul><li>OSHA requires every school to create a written Exposure Control Plan and make it available to every school employee. </li></ul><ul><li>Whitnall School District has a copy in every school. It is stored in the school office or Health Room. If you would like to view it please contact me. </li></ul>
  24. 24. REDUCE your RISK <ul><li>Always use Universal or Standard Precautions. </li></ul><ul><li>Wear gloves when handling blood and body fluids, and potentially infectious material. Remove them carefully to prevent contamination. If you have questions on this ask the nurse in your building for instructions. </li></ul><ul><li>Remember Gloves cannot be reused! </li></ul><ul><li>If gloves are not available, you may use a piece of plastic or other waterproof barrier, to protect yourself from blood or body fluids. </li></ul>
  25. 25. REDUCE your RISK <ul><li>Hand washing is the most important way to prevent the spread of communicable diseases. </li></ul><ul><li>Gloves are needed to protect against Bloodborne pathogens. </li></ul><ul><li>Always wash hands after glove removal. If skin or mucous membranes accidentally come in direct contact with blood or other body fluids, this will help protect you from contamination. </li></ul><ul><li>If soap and water are not available, use an antiseptic hand cleanser or towelette. Wash hands as soon as facilities are available. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Reduce your risks <ul><li>Do not drink, eat, smoke or apply cosmetics or lip balms or handle contact lenses in areas of potential exposure. </li></ul><ul><li>Minimize splashing, spraying, splattering, and spreading of droplets of body fluids while caring for an injured student or co-worker, by containing the area involved and calming student. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep food out of refrigerators, freezers, shelves, cabinets, countertops where blood or body fluids are present. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Also REDUCE your RISKS BY: <ul><li>Call custodians for clean up. They have been trained to clean infected areas appropriately. </li></ul><ul><li>Never pick up contaminated broken glass, or sharp equipment with gloved or bare hands. Use broom and dustpan, or tongs to prevent contamination. At school the </li></ul><ul><li>custodian will do this. </li></ul>
  28. 28. This will also reduce your risks <ul><li>Contaminated equipment should never be handled without gloves being worn. </li></ul><ul><li>Have all surfaces cleaned appropriately as soon as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Resuscitator devices are available in the Health Room or First Aid Kits for employees trained in CPR. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Post-Exposure <ul><li>If you have had an exposure, contact me and your administrator within 24 hours. </li></ul><ul><li>A post-exposure form will be filled out and if you consent, a medical evaluation, blood testing, and counseling will be made available. </li></ul><ul><li>Hepatitis B Vaccination may be one of the best ways to prevent Hepatitis B infection. If you have an exposure this vaccination will be made available to you at no cost. It can be given within 24 hrs of exposure. It consists of three injections over a 6-month period. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Conclusion <ul><li>As a school employee, you must be ready to react quickly and carefully to an emergency using Universal or Standard Precautions. Knowing the facts about bloodborne diseases will remind you to take the time to protect yourself from contamination from blood, body fluids or contaminated articles. </li></ul>
  31. 31. Completion <ul><li>Please click on the second attachment and complete the test and include your name, school and position. </li></ul><ul><li>Please select the answer you feel is most correct and submit as instructed. </li></ul><ul><li>Feel free to contact me with any questions via e-mail or phone with any questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Susan Larson: WHS -8509; HCES – 8809; WMS-8659; EES-8909 </li></ul>

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