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Implementing California’s Climate Change Legislation: The City of Sacramento General Plan

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Implementing California’s Climate Change Legislation: The City of Sacramento General Plan

  1. 1. Implementing California’s Climate Change Legislation: The City of Sacramento General Plan<br />American Planning Association<br />Woodie Tescher, Principal Technical Professional, PBS&J<br />J. Laurence Mintier, Principal, Mintier Harnish<br />Stephen Hammond, Principal, WRT/Wallace Roberts & Todd<br />
  2. 2. Our Session…<br />Context: California’s Climate Change Legislation<br />Implementing the Legislation through the Comprehensive/General Plan<br />Implementing the Plan<br />
  3. 3. LEGISLATIVE CONTEXT<br />California’s Climate Change Legislation: <br />The City of Sacramento General Plan<br />
  4. 4. Major Actions Addressing Climate Change<br />San Bernardino County Lawsuit<br />City of Stockton Settlement Agreement<br />AG’s Office Intervention<br />Executive Order<br />S-3-05<br />AB 32<br />Draft CEQA Guidelines<br />SB 97<br />SB 375<br />Executive Order S-20-06<br />Executive Order<br />S-13-08<br />
  5. 5. AB 32 – Global Warming Solutions Act<br />California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the Climate Action Team (CAT)<br />1990 GHG emissions and 2020 GHG reduction targets<br />Reporting and verification<br />Maximum technologically feasible and cost effective measures<br />Monitoring and enforcement<br />Scoping Plan<br />Market-based compliance mechanisms<br />Additional limits<br />
  6. 6. Attorney General’s Office Efforts<br />Pursuing climate change-related efforts<br />CEQA comment letters<br />Mitigation measures<br />Climate Action Plans<br />
  7. 7. Attorney General’s Office Efforts<br />San Bernardino County lawsuit/Settlement Agreement<br />Add new policies<br />GHG Emissions Reduction Plan<br />Diesel engine exhaust controls <br />
  8. 8. Attorney General’s Office Efforts<br />City of Stockton settlement agreement<br />Climate Action Plan/Advisory Committee<br />Reduce VMT<br />Green building ordinance<br />Financing mechanisms <br />Transit Program<br />Infill targets and balanced growth<br />Early protection actions<br />
  9. 9. SB 375 Major Components<br />GHG reduction targets<br />Regional Transportation Plans (RTPs) <br />Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) <br />Alternative Planning Strategies (APS)<br />Housing Element Reform<br />Links timing of RTP and RHNA/Housing Elements<br />Incentives not Regulations<br />CEQA streamlining<br />Transportation funding<br />
  10. 10. What is SB 375?<br />…its an “everything bill” crammed into one…and I have to implement it!<br />It’s a Housing Reform Bill!<br />It’s a Climate Change Bill!<br />SB 375<br />Housing<br />MPO<br />CARB<br />Enviros<br />Planner<br />Builders<br />It’s a Growth Control Bill!<br />It’s a Land Use Bill!<br />It’s a CEQA Reform Bill!<br />
  11. 11. SACOG Blueprint Process<br /><ul><li>Sacramento Area Council of Governments
  12. 12. Extensive public outreach effort
  13. 13. Adopted by SACOG in 2004
  14. 14. Endorsed by SACOG’s cities and counties</li></li></ul><li>SACOG Blueprint<br />Growth Principles<br /><ul><li>Transportation Choices
  15. 15. Mixed Use Developments
  16. 16. Compact Development
  17. 17. Housing Choice and Diversity
  18. 18. Use of Existing Assets
  19. 19. Quality Design
  20. 20. Natural Resources Conservation</li></li></ul><li>2030 General Plan & SACOG Blueprint<br /><ul><li>Common Themes and Principles
  21. 21. Focus on Infill
  22. 22. Encouraging Mixed-use, Compact Development
  23. 23. Moving People, not Cars
  24. 24. 2050 Blueprint vs 2030 General Plan
  25. 25. 2035 MTP
  26. 26. Taking the Blueprint Further
  27. 27. More infill, smaller footprint</li></li></ul><li>Implementing the Legislation:comprehensive plans<br />California’s Climate Change Legislation:<br />The City of Sacramento General Plan<br />
  28. 28. Our Challenge…<br />Land Use<br />Housing<br />CLIMATE<br />CHANGE<br />Greenhouse Gas Reduction<br />Circulation/Mobility<br />Conservation<br />Adaptation<br />Open Space<br />Safety<br />Noise<br />Permissive Elements<br />
  29. 29. Strategies…<br />Land Use: Compact Growth, Infill, Mixed-Use, & TOD<br />Land Use & Mobility: Walkable Streets<br />Conservation & Infrastructure: Alternative Energy<br />Land Use & Conservation: Green Buildings<br />Mobility: Transit<br />Open Space & Safety: Flooding & Habitat<br />Mobility: Alternative Fuel Vehicles<br />Conservation: Community Gardens<br />
  30. 30. Our Solution…<br />Address in all relevant elements of the General Plan<br />Describe climate change as an overarching theme of the General Plan<br />Incorporate a matrix correlating climate change objectives with applicable policies<br />
  31. 31. Our Solution…<br />Overarching Plan Themes<br />Making Great Places<br />Growing Smarter<br />Maintaining a Vibrant Economy<br />Creating a Healthy City<br />Living Lightly-Reducing Our “Carbon Footprint”<br />Developing a Sustainable Future<br />
  32. 32. Our Solution…<br />
  33. 33. Our Solution…<br />
  34. 34. Land Use<br />The illustration to the left identifies the relative <br />amount of change that is expected to occur through 2030 in different parts of the city as follows:<br /><ul><li>Open Space.These areas are expected to remain in open space use such as agriculture, habitat protection, or regional recreation.
  35. 35. Preserve and Enhance.These areas are expected to retain their current form and character, but will experience some minor infill and reuse consistent with their current form and character.
  36. 36. Improve and Evolve. These areas are expected to experience significant change through infill, reuse, and redevelopment.
  37. 37. Transformation - Urban. These existing urban areas are expected to experience dramatic change through major development and redevelopment projects.
  38. 38. Transformation - New Growth.These existing open space areas are expected to experience dramatic change through major new development projects. </li></li></ul><li>Land Use<br />Special Study Areas<br /><ul><li>Not planned for growth
  39. 39. Possible annexation areas
  40. 40. Require GPA, Community Plan, & applicable master plans & financing plans
  41. 41. Must provide community benefits</li></ul>Planned Development<br /><ul><li>Must be developed consistent with Vision & GP policies
  42. 42. No new PD areas on adoption of GP</li></li></ul><li>Land Use / Urban Form Designations<br /><ul><li>Address “place-making,” not just land use
  43. 43. Responsive to existing context
  44. 44. Clear about outcomes—visualizes change
  45. 45. Concrete rather than abstract</li></li></ul><li>Land Use / Urban Form Designations<br />Designation Categories relate to “Place Types”:<br /><ul><li>Neighborhoods
  46. 46. Centers
  47. 47. Corridors
  48. 48. Open Space
  49. 49. Other</li></li></ul><li>Urban Form and Climate Change?<br />Making the link between urban form and:<br /><ul><li>Climate Change
  50. 50. Sustainability
  51. 51. Environment
  52. 52. Social Equity
  53. 53. Economic vitality
  54. 54. Livability
  55. 55. Health and Safety
  56. 56. Mobility</li></li></ul><li>Urban Form—A Place-based Approach<br />Understanding the Physical DNA of the Place:<br /><ul><li>Key form-giving features
  57. 57. Features that contribute to community identity
  58. 58. Characteristics to protect and enhance
  59. 59. Characteristics to mitigate or change</li></li></ul><li>Urban Form—A Place-based Approach<br />Understanding the Physical DNA of the Place<br />
  60. 60. Urban Form—A Place-based Approach<br />Developing a <br />Typology of Place<br />as the foundation for<br />future recommendations<br />Place-making Components<br /><ul><li>The Street
  61. 61. The Block
  62. 62. The Site
  63. 63. The Building</li></li></ul><li>Land Use / Urban Form Designations<br />Role of the designation in Citywide growth strategy<br />Each designation addresses 3 topics:<br /><ul><li>Urban Form Guidelines
  64. 64. Allowed Uses
  65. 65. Development Standards</li></ul>Key urban design characteristics associated with designation<br />
  66. 66. Land Use / Urban Form Designations<br />Each designation addresses 3 topics:<br /><ul><li>Urban Form Guidelines
  67. 67. Allowed Uses
  68. 68. Development Standards</li></ul>Description of Allowed Uses including building types<br />
  69. 69. Land Use / Urban Form Designations<br />Each designation addresses 3 topics:<br /><ul><li>Urban Form Guidelines
  70. 70. Allowed Uses
  71. 71. Development Standards</li></ul>Development Standards include minimum and maximum intensities<br />
  72. 72. Land Use / Urban Form Designations<br />Each designation addresses 3 topics:<br /><ul><li>Urban Form Guidelines
  73. 73. Allowed Uses
  74. 74. Development Standards</li></ul>Development standards illustrated to help visualize density<br />
  75. 75. Land Use / Urban Form Designations<br />Each designation addresses 3 topics:<br /><ul><li>Urban Form Guidelines
  76. 76. Allowed Uses
  77. 77. Development Standards</li></ul>Illustrates how uses, guidelines, and standards might look “on the ground”<br />
  78. 78. Visualizing Change<br />Mitigating the fear of change—<br />Removing uncertainty and inspiring action<br />Before<br />After<br />
  79. 79. Visualizing Change<br />Mitigating the fear of change—<br />Removing uncertainty and inspiring action<br />
  80. 80. Policy That Reflects Concern for Design<br />Policy Themes<br /><ul><li>City of Neighborhoods
  81. 81. City of Rivers
  82. 82. City of Trees
  83. 83. City of Destinations & Memorable Places
  84. 84. City Connected & Accessible
  85. 85. City Sustained & Renewed
  86. 86. City Fair & Equitable</li></li></ul><li>Economic Development<br />Business diversity & sustainability<br />Compact & mixed-use development: Market intensification in proximity to businesses<br />New “green” businesses<br />
  87. 87. Mobility<br />Comprehensive Transportation System<br />Complete streets<br />Core area level of service exemption<br />Transportation Demand Management<br />Modes<br />Walkable communities<br />Bikeways<br />Public transit<br />Roadways<br />Appropriate parking<br />Aviation<br />
  88. 88. Utilities<br />Adequacy to Support Development<br />Alternative Approaches for Sustainable Utility Systems<br />Energy generation & conservation<br />Water conservation<br />Stormwater management<br />Waste recycling<br />Other<br />
  89. 89. Environmental Resources<br />Resource Preservation & Conservation<br />Urban Agriculture/Local Food Supply<br />
  90. 90. Environmental Constraints<br />Adaptation to Climate Change Risks: Increased Flooding, Wildfire Risk, and so on<br />
  91. 91. IMPLEMENTATION & MONITORING<br />California’s Climate Change Legislation: <br />The City of Sacramento General Plan<br />
  92. 92. Administration & Implementation<br />Specific Implementation Programs<br />Categories of implementation<br />General Plan maintenance and monitoring:<br />Annual review and report<br />5-year review and update<br />Livability Index<br />
  93. 93. Categories of Implementation<br /><ul><li>Tools to implement policies and programs
  94. 94. Included with all policies and programs
  95. 95. Eight categories of implementation
  96. 96. Regulation and Development Review (RDR)
  97. 97. City Master Plans, Strategies, and Programs (MPSP)
  98. 98. Financing and Budgeting (FB)
  99. 99. Planning Studies and Reports (PSR)
  100. 100. City Services and Operations (SO)
  101. 101. Inter-governmental Coordination (IGC)
  102. 102. Joint Partnerships with the Private Sector (JP)
  103. 103. Public Information (PI)</li></li></ul><li>Specific Implementation Programs<br />
  104. 104. Livability Index<br /><ul><li>Indicators program
  105. 105. Used to measure effectiveness
  106. 106. Tracks key livability factors
  107. 107. Economy
  108. 108. Health of residents
  109. 109. Quality of life
  110. 110. Reviewed and updated annually
  111. 111. Used to set priorities</li></li></ul><li>THE PLANNING PROCESS<br />California’s Climate Change Legislation: <br />The City of Sacramento General Plan<br />
  112. 112. Public Outreach & Involvement<br />COMMUNITY CONVENTION: CELEBRATING THE GENERAL PLAN<br />

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