Making Your Writing Flow, Part II

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Making Your Writing Flow, Part II

  1. 1. Making Your Writing Flow<br />A Writing Center On-Line Short Course<br />By John Tiedemann<br />University Writing Program<br />University of Denver<br />Part II<br />
  2. 2. Beginnings and Endings;<br />Complexity and Simplicity<br />
  3. 3. Beginnings . . . <br />Use the beginning of your sentences to refer to (a) what you’ve already mentioned or (b) knowledge that you can assume you and your reader readily share.<br /> <br />
  4. 4. Beginnings . . . <br />Use the beginning of your sentences to refer to (a) what you’ve already mentioned or (b) knowledge that you can assume you and your reader readily share.<br /> <br />Example: Jon Stewart is perhaps the most accomplished satirist working today. Satire, as mentioned previously, attacks those in power in the name of truth.<br />
  5. 5. Beginnings . . . <br />Use the beginning of your sentences to refer to (a) what you’ve already mentioned or (b) knowledge that you can assume you and your reader readily share.<br /> <br />Example: Jon Stewart is perhaps the most accomplished satirist working today. Satire, as mentioned previously, attacks those in power in the name of truth.<br />Revised: Satire attacks those in power in the name of truth. Perhaps the most accomplished satirist working today is Jon Stewart.<br />
  6. 6. Beginnings . . . <br />Use the beginning of your sentences to refer to (a) what you’ve already mentioned or (b) knowledge that you can assume you and your reader readily share.<br />Example: The number of wounded and dead in World War I exceeded all the other wars in European history. One of the reasons for the lingering animosity between some nations today is the memory of this terrible carnage.<br />
  7. 7. Beginnings . . . <br />Use the beginning of your sentences to refer to (a) what you’ve already mentioned or (b) knowledge that you can assume you and your reader readily share.<br />Example: The number of wounded and dead in World War I exceeded all the other wars in European history. One of the reasons for the lingering animosity between some nations today is the memory of this terrible carnage.<br /> <br />Revised: Of all the wars in European history up to that point, none exceeded World War I in the number of wounded and dead. The memory of this terrible carnage is one of the reasons for the animosity between some European nations today.<br />
  8. 8. . . . Endings<br />Put your most important ideas at the end of your sentence, as well as the information you intend to develop in the next sentence.<br />
  9. 9. . . . Endings<br />Put your most important ideas at the end of your sentence, as well as the information you intend to develop in the next sentence.<br />Example: I crashed the car last Saturday afternoon, on my way home from a trip to the supermarket and the Laundromat. I escaped without a scratch, though the car was totaled.<br />
  10. 10. . . . Endings<br />Put your most important ideas at the end of your sentence, as well as the information you intend to develop in the next sentence.<br />Example: I crashed the car last Saturday afternoon, on my way home from a trip to the supermarket and the Laundromat. I escaped without a scratch, though the car was totaled.<br />Revised: Last Saturday afternoon, on my way home from a trip to the supermarket and the Laundromat, I crashed the car. The car was totaled, but I escaped without a scratch.<br />
  11. 11. . . . Endings<br />Put your most important ideas at the end of your sentence, as well as the information you intend to develop in the next sentence.<br /> <br />Example: President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated on April 14, 1865, while watching a play at Ford’s Theater. The nation was shocked by this act of violence.<br />
  12. 12. . . . Endings<br />Put your most important ideas at the end of your sentence, as well as the information you intend to develop in the next sentence.<br /> <br />Example: President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated on April 14, 1865, while watching a play at Ford’s Theater. The nation was shocked by this act of violence.<br /> <br />Revised: On April 14, 1865, while watching a play at Ford’s Theater, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. This act of violence shocked the nation.<br />
  13. 13. Complexity and Simplicity<br />If your sentences feel tangled, observe this rule: The greater the logical complexity of the thought is, the simpler the syntax of the sentences expressing it ought to be.<br />
  14. 14. Complexity and Simplicity<br />If your sentences feel tangled, observe this rule: The greater the logical complexity of the thought is, the simpler the syntax of the sentences expressing it ought to be.<br /> Democracy has been around since the time of Socrates and has continued into the present day, in countries such as the United States, where the citizens hold power under a free electoral system. Even though democracy operates differently in different places, all democracies have two characteristic features, which are that all citizens have equal access to power, and that all citizens enjoy universally recognized liberties, including freedom of thought, freedom of expression, and freedom of speech. <br />
  15. 15. Complexity and Simplicity<br />If your sentences feel tangled, observe this rule: The greater the logical complexity of the thought is, the simpler the syntax of the sentences expressing it ought to be.<br /> Democracy has been around since Socrates’s day. It continues to thrive today. Democracy operates differently in different places. However, all democracies share two characteristic features. First, all citizens have equal access to power. Second, all citizens enjoy universally recognized liberties. These liberties include freedom of thought, of expression, and of speech. <br />
  16. 16. End of Part II lecture<br />Complete the exercises you were emailed, and send the results back to me:<br />John.Tiedemann@du.edu<br />Key points are available as a PDF on Blackboard, in the Course Documents folder.<br />

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