CONVERSING WITHSOURCESOr, How to Do More with Other Scholars’ Work than “Back Up” YourOpinions.
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel...
Conversational strategies   Agreement and disagreement   Specification and generalization   Critical questioning and re...
Conversational strategies   Agreement and disagreement   Specification and generalization   Critical questioning and re...
Conversational strategies   Agreement and disagreement   Specification and generalization   Critical questioning and re...
Exercise               The city in its complete sense, then, is a geographic plexus, an economic               organizatio...
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Conversing with sources

  1. 1. CONVERSING WITHSOURCESOr, How to Do More with Other Scholars’ Work than “Back Up” YourOpinions.
  2. 2. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them.Agree with the source statement. Explain why.Disagree with the source statement. Explain why.Offer a more specific version of the source statement.Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative ispreferable.Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  3. 3. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why.Disagree with the source statement. Explain why.Offer a more specific version of the source statement.Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative ispreferable.Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  4. 4. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why.Offer a more specific version of the source statement.Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative ispreferable.Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  5. 5. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement.Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative ispreferable.Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  6. 6. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable.Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  7. 7. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  8. 8. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  9. 9. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  10. 10. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement.Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  11. 11. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement. Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference.Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  12. 12. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement. Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference. Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  13. 13. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement. Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference. Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why.Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a questionabout that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  14. 14. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement. Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference. Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a question about that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought.Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  15. 15. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement. Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference. Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a question about that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response.Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  16. 16. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement. Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference. Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a question about that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better.Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  17. 17. Let’s play telephoneJohn’s source statement: My students seem tired and stressed out. I should ask the University tocancel the rest of the term and send everyone on a fabulous vacation.Other teacher’s source statement: Your students are tired and stressed out because they lackdiscipline. You should double the work you’re giving them. Agree with the source statement. Explain why. Disagree with the source statement. Explain why. Offer a more specific version of the source statement. Disagree with the last speaker’s statement and offer an alternative. Explain why your alternative is preferable. Ask a question about the source statement meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Ask John for another source statement. Take a side with whichever source statement you prefer. Explain your preference. Agree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Disagree with the previous speaker’s statement. Explain why. Identify a (perhaps subtle) point of agreement between the two source statements. Ask a question about that point of agreement that’s meant to provoke critical thought. Respond to the critical question. Be sure to explain the reasoning behind your response. Agree in part with both source statements, but propose a third alternative. Explain why it’s better. Agree with the previous speaker’s alternative, adding a “because clause” that explains why.
  18. 18. Conversational strategies Agreement and disagreement Specification and generalization Critical questioning and response Synthesizing ideas and generating new ones
  19. 19. Conversational strategies Agreement and disagreement Specification and generalization Critical questioning and response Synthesizing ideas and generating new ones The city in its complete sense, then, is a geographic plexus, an economic organization, an institutional process, a theater of social action, and an aesthetic symbol of collective unity (185). ~ Lewis Mumford, “What Is a City?”
  20. 20. Conversational strategies Agreement and disagreement Specification and generalization Critical questioning and response Synthesizing ideas and generating new ones The city in its complete sense, then, is a geographic plexus, an economic organization, an institutional process, a theater of social action, and an aesthetic symbol of collective unity (185). ~ Lewis Mumford, “What Is a City?” In recent years, culture has also become a more explicit site of conflicts over social differences and urban fears. . . (2). The look and feel of cities reflect decisions about what – and who – should be visible and what should not. . . (7). ~ Sharon Zukin, The Culture of Cities
  21. 21. Exercise The city in its complete sense, then, is a geographic plexus, an economic organization, an institutional process, a theater of social action, and an aesthetic symbol of collective unity [emphasis mine]. (185) ~ Lewis Mumford, “What Is a City?” In recent years, culture has also become a more explicit site of conflicts over social differences and urban fears. . . (2). The look and feel of cities reflect decisions about what – and who – should be visible and what should not. . . (7). ~ Sharon Zukin, The Culture of Cities1. Write a paragraph in which you apply Mumford or Zukin to the specific space that you visited.2. Write a paragraph in which you ask a critical question about either Mumford or Zukin’s arguments, based upon your analysis of the space you visited.3. Write a paragraph in which you connect Mumford and Zukin, and then contribute to their conversation about cities an original argument of your own.

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