4 uses of secondary sources

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4 uses of secondary sources

  1. 1. 4 USES OF SECONDARYSOURCESJohn Tiedemann, University Writing Center
  2. 2. 4 ways to use a secondarysource To support our argument.
  3. 3. 4 ways to use a secondarysource To support our argument. To contextualize our argument.
  4. 4. 4 ways to use a secondarysource To support our argument. To contextualize our argument. As an object of criticism.
  5. 5. 4 ways to use a secondarysource To support our argument. To contextualize our argument. As an object of criticism. As an object of analysis.
  6. 6. as support
  7. 7. as context
  8. 8. as object of criticismWhile Urbano (1979b) has shown that a concept of non-orderwas an integral component of Andean social organization, thisnotion should be understood as an element in the the dynamiclogic of Andean models of society and the universe as a whole.As a concept, it is very different from the Christian construct ofthe devil developed in the late Middle Ages. (173)...Several interpreters of Andean religion have asserted that someform of “witchcraft” did exist in the Andes prior to Spanishcolonization (Rowe 1957:297–98). I suggest, however, that theevidential basis on which these assertions were made should bereevaluated. (174)
  9. 9. as object of analysis
  10. 10. an important difference You’re more likely to summarize, rather than quote, your sources when using them to support or contextualize your argument, since you aren’t thereby adding anything new to your argument. You’re more likely to quote, rather than summarize, your sources when using them as objects of criticism or, especially, analysis, since in these cases you’re using them to generate new arguments of your own.
  11. 11. Try to use this passage in any one of the 4 ways we’vediscussed:The Spanish decreed that witchcraft and idolatrywere indistinguishable; thus, witchcraft,maintenance of ancient traditions, and consciouspolitical resistance became increasinglyintertwined for colonial Indians. “Witches,”manipulating structures, and ideologiesintroduced by the Spanish formed crucial links inan underground politico-religious movement thatwas emerging in response to colonialism.Irene Silverblatt, Moon, Sun, and Witches, (195)

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