Gender Education

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Gender Education

  1. 1. ELEMENTS OF RESEARCH XEF 500 PROFESSOR: DR. O. DENIS EKWERIKE CHEYNEY UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GRADUATE DIVISION of EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION & FOUNDATIONS JO DAN FLOYD, MARCUS FULTON, TERESA HOPSON, ARTHUR JOHNSON, TIA LONG, ANTIONETTE POWELL   What Is the Impact of Gender-Based Education On Public School Achievement?
  2. 2. Table of Contents Chapter I : Introduction Chapter II : Literature Review Chapter III : Methodology Chapter IV: Results Chapter V: Discussions  
  3. 3. Introduction
  4. 4. Methodogy
  5. 5. <ul><li>Type of Design: Comparison Study </li></ul><ul><li>Variables: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Independent: Gender </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dependent: Student Achievement </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Population </li></ul><ul><li>Urban male and female students within the Philadelphia Region </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Age 8-14 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attend Public School </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Included 60 students: 25 boys, 35 girls </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Instrumentation </li></ul><ul><li>10-item survey, “Gender Preference Survey” using the Likert Scale </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Questions included: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Gender preference </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Participation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Competition </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Achievement </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Teacher Rapport </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Over Educational Experience </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Demographic Information: gender; grade level </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Reliability & Validity Validity : Evidence provided support for the relations to other variables of validity. Reliability : Questions were repeated to show consistency and stability of answers
  9. 9. <ul><li>Procedure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual in-person surveys </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lasting 20-25 minutes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitored by homeroom teacher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers administered the surveys and returned within two days </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anonymity was ensured </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Data Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Organized into four categories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Girls </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boys </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Combined </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Overall rating </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reviewed and critiqued to identify commonalities </li></ul><ul><li>Based on the data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inferred that girls do better than boys </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Literature Review
  12. 12. <ul><li>Inclusion Criteria: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Twenty-Year Period from 1988-2008 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research cited from public school data findings. </li></ul></ul>Literature Review
  13. 13. <ul><li>Topics Covered: </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive Ability: Genetic or Social Conditioning? </li></ul><ul><li>Coeducational Disparity </li></ul><ul><li>Disadvantages of Same-Sex Schooling </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits of Same-Sex Schooling </li></ul><ul><li>Summary </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Literature Review
  14. 14. <ul><li>Genetic or Social Conditioning? </li></ul><ul><li>Boys and girls are 'hard-wired' at birth (Kimura, 2004) </li></ul><ul><li>Social Conditioning (Elder & Paul, 2007; Tindall & Hamil, 2004) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Literature Review
  15. 15. <ul><li>Coeducational Disparity </li></ul><ul><li>Girls get less attention (McCloskey, 1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Girls may get sexually-harassed (McCloskey, 1994) </li></ul><ul><li>Girls self-esteem wanes during adolescent years </li></ul><ul><li> (Brown- Nagin, 2000) </li></ul><ul><li>Girls better at language arts (Worrell, 2005; Kimura, 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>However, most students at the bottom of class are boys (Pollack, 1999) </li></ul><ul><li>More boys are held back, suspended, misdiagnosed </li></ul><ul><li>(Halpern, 2000; Weil, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Literature Review
  16. 16. <ul><li>Disadvantages for Same-Sex Schooling </li></ul><ul><li>Students in same-sex environment may become homosexual (Salomone, 2003; Sather, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Gender stereotypes may be reinforced (Elder & Paul, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Civil rights violation (Strauss, 2006) </li></ul>Literature Review
  17. 17. <ul><li>Benefits of Same-Sex Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Students see same-sex teacher role models (Riordan, 2000) </li></ul><ul><li>Students feel less embarrassment, less peer pressure (Salomone, 2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Students (both genders)have higher career goals </li></ul><ul><li>(Riorda as cited in Brown-Nagin, 2000) </li></ul><ul><li>Girls can participate in male-dominated sports (Russell-Baca, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Boys can participate in arts or 'girly' classes (Russell-Baca, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Girls can participate in math or science (masculine) classes </li></ul><ul><li>(Lippa, 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>Classes of both genders have less discipline problems (Lippa, 2002) </li></ul>Literature Review
  18. 18. <ul><li>Summary </li></ul><ul><li>Gender-specific environments have a positive impact on academic achievement </li></ul><ul><li>(Barton & Cohen, 1994; Lippa, 2002; Salomone, 2003; Tindall & Hamil, 2004; Weil, 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Girls and boys are similar and different....Differences are not deficiencies” (Halpern, 2000, p. 73) </li></ul>Literature Review
  19. 19. Results
  20. 20. Results Percentage of boys and girls who participated The information provided in this pie chart shows out of a total of 60 students 42 % were boys and 58% were girls. Figure 1-2 Grade of student participants Figure 1-1
  21. 21. Overall level of Achievement due to preference There was a big difference in the preferences of the students in 3 rd grade compared to those in the 8 th grade. Overall the third grade students agreed that a gendered- based education would help them to improve academically. On the other hand the 8 th graders did not seem very interested in gendered-based education. The findings show that either way they feel that they would achievement at their individual potential. Results
  22. 22. Interpretation of Research
  23. 23. Interpretation of Research A. Benefits outweighs negatives 1. Academically beneficial 2. Less behavioral problems 3. Self-esteem improves
  24. 24. B. As it relates to our surveys 1. Children want to be in mixed classes 2. Socialization is a big deal 3. Children not aware of their academic future at these ages Interpretation of Research
  25. 25. C. Limitations 1. Not enough time 2. Not enough students D. Generalizability 1. Can be performed with any school, any grade Interpretation of Research
  26. 26. <ul><li>E. Recommendations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider Girls High, and Southwest Boys as agents of change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More research on topic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>More surveys available on topic </li></ul></ul><ul><li>F. Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>1. Try It, it may actually work!! </li></ul>Interpretation of Research

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