Livelihood impact of aquaculture on the poor: Experience from Bangladesh WorldFish Center - Bangladesh and South Asia KM J...
Introduction: Aquaculture and the poor <ul><li>The ability of the poor to engage in aquaculture or to derive a benefit fro...
Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) <ul><li>Duration : 2000 – 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Poor farmers having...
Adivasi Fisheries Project (AFP) <ul><li>Duration : 2007 – 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Poor  and landless Adivasi farmers </li><...
Capacity building activities and extension approaches <ul><li>Technology dissemination through partners (NGOs) </li></ul><...
Livelihood diversification strategies <ul><li>Strengthening the aquaculture value chain (AFP) </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting ...
Livelihood Outcomes <ul><li>Productivity increased from pond and rice field (mt/ha) </li></ul><ul><li>Income (US$/hh) incr...
Livelihood  Outcomes  (contd.) <ul><li>Fish consumption (gm/capita/day) improved.  </li></ul><ul><li>Frequency of fish con...
Livelihood  Outcomes  (contd.) <ul><li>Whole family approach successfully involved women in aquaculture </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Conclusion <ul><li>Results suggest that with adequate support, aquaculture could also contribute significantly to increase...
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Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh

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Science Forum Day 4 - Khondeker Murshed e Jahan - Livelihood Bangladesh

  1. 1. Livelihood impact of aquaculture on the poor: Experience from Bangladesh WorldFish Center - Bangladesh and South Asia KM Jahan and Benoy Barman
  2. 2. Introduction: Aquaculture and the poor <ul><li>The ability of the poor to engage in aquaculture or to derive a benefit from aquaculture activities has been questioned </li></ul><ul><li>Constraints to involve poor in aquaculture </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Limited access to resources </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Availability and high price of external inputs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>capital investment. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>This study shows that aquaculture can contribute to improving the livelihoods of the poor </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Adivasi Fisheries Project (AFP) supported by EU </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) supported by USAID </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Development of Sustainable Aquaculture Project (DSAP) <ul><li>Duration : 2000 – 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Poor farmers having resources for aquaculture </li></ul><ul><li>68,000 farmers benefitted (Direct: 44,000; Secondary adopters:24,000) </li></ul><ul><li>42 out 64 districts in Bangladesh </li></ul>
  4. 4. Adivasi Fisheries Project (AFP) <ul><li>Duration : 2007 – 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Poor and landless Adivasi farmers </li></ul><ul><li>9,650 Adivasi farmers benefitted (Direct: 3,650; Secondary adopters: 6,000) </li></ul><ul><li>3 district of northwest and 2 district of the northern region </li></ul>
  5. 5. Capacity building activities and extension approaches <ul><li>Technology dissemination through partners (NGOs) </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge development of the communities through </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Group approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Farmer Field School (FFS) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Whole family approach to increase women participation </li></ul><ul><li>Asset development of the poor communities </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthening linkage with Local Support Agencies and stakeholders </li></ul>
  6. 6. Livelihood diversification strategies <ul><li>Strengthening the aquaculture value chain (AFP) </li></ul><ul><li>Promoting small-scale aquaculture options (DSAP & AFP) </li></ul>Pond fish culture Rice- fish culture Cage culture Fingerling Trader Fish selling Netting group
  7. 7. Livelihood Outcomes <ul><li>Productivity increased from pond and rice field (mt/ha) </li></ul><ul><li>Income (US$/hh) increased from aquaculture and related activities </li></ul><ul><li>Contribution of fish in hh income increased to 14% - 15% from 3% - 7% of before intervention (DSAP & AFP) </li></ul>Projects Before Project After project Control DSAP 1.3 2.7 1.7 AFP 0.9 2.8 - Projects Before Project After project Control DSAP 134 252 121 AFP 17 124 -
  8. 8. Livelihood Outcomes (contd.) <ul><li>Fish consumption (gm/capita/day) improved. </li></ul><ul><li>Frequency of fish consumption of hh increased from 6 meals/month to 32 meals/month (AFP) </li></ul><ul><li>Shorten food deficit period from 1.8 months to 1.1 months after project intervention (AFP) </li></ul><ul><li>Carps contributed 70% of total fish consumption. Only 6-7% came from nutrient dense small fish (DSAP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Aquaculture development dominated by carps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>94% of ponds are under carp polyculture (village census, DSAP) </li></ul></ul>Projects Before Project After project Control DSAP 42 60 41 AFP 17 36 -
  9. 9. Livelihood Outcomes (contd.) <ul><li>Whole family approach successfully involved women in aquaculture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Participation rate increased to 37% - 40% compared to baseline of 25% - 27% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Women operated ponds received higher production compared to men (2.9 mt/ha compared to2.7 mt/ha) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HH consumption of women operated ponds were 1.84 kg/capita/month compared to 1.79 kg/capita/month of men operated ponds </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Access to extension agencies and market improved </li></ul><ul><ul><li>20% - 30% more hh has now access to extension agencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>40%-50% more hh has now access to input/output market </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Conclusion <ul><li>Results suggest that with adequate support, aquaculture could also contribute significantly to increase livelihood outcomes of the poor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope for involve poor in aquaculture value chains </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Required poor focused development program </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Aquaculture development dominated by larger fish species (e.g., carp) reason for declining trend of small fish species </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote production of smaller species alongside large carp species may be an alternative options </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gender focus extension approaches found effective in increasing women involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Networking with extension agencies and other stakeholders is important for sustainability </li></ul>
  11. 11. Thank You

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