Dried fish production,
consumption and
trade in Bangladesh
Ben Belton, Mostafa A.R. Hossain, Md.
Mofizur Rahman & Shakunta...
Overview
• Why are we interested in dried fish?
• Dried fish consumption
• An overview of the dried fish sector
• Labour i...
Why are we interested in
dried fish?
Percentage of households consuming different types of fish
within the last 3 days (Be...
Two main forms –
dried (shutki), fermented (chapa/shidol)
Sold in small quantities
(easily divisible, low nominal cost)
Mixed with oils, spices and vegetables
(carrier of other nutrients)
Where is dried fish
consumed?
Annual consumption of dried fish (g/capita)
– figures extracted from IFPRI BIHS dataset
Where is dried
fish produced?
Main marine species about 85% of total production –
loytia, churri, phaisha and many others
Puti is the most important freshwater species
dried – mostly used for production of chapa
Fish driers minimize labour costs by employing
women, children, some bonded labour, and
providing payment in kind
There is a substantial trade in dried fish – at least 20%
consumed in Bangladesh is imported
High value products and fermented products (shidol) are
exported for consumption by overseas Bangladeshis and
East Asian m...
Sharks fins and the stomachs and swim bladders of
some large M/FW species are shipped to Hong Kong
Pesticide is often used during drying to prevent
maggot infestation
Insecticides are also used during storage to
prevent insect damage
Approximately 15% of marine landings which
are dried are converted to fish meal
Most fish meal is made from bycatch of crabs and
fish not fit for human consumption
Fish meal production does not directly impact food
security, but fishing practices may not be
sustainable in the long run
Dried fish is a concentrated source of protein,
vitamin A and calcium, and is a good source of
iron and omega-3
(4kg fresh...
Conclusions
• Dried fish production provides livelihoods
and incomes for large numbers of poor
people with few alternative...
Thank You
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Dried Fish Production, Consumption and Trade in Bangladesh. By Ben Belton, Mostafa A.R. Hossain, Md. Mofizur Rahman and Shakuntala H. Thilsted.

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Fish and Nutrition Workshop Day 1 (Technical Session II )

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Dried Fish Production, Consumption and Trade in Bangladesh. By Ben Belton, Mostafa A.R. Hossain, Md. Mofizur Rahman and Shakuntala H. Thilsted.

  1. 1. Dried fish production, consumption and trade in Bangladesh Ben Belton, Mostafa A.R. Hossain, Md. Mofizur Rahman & Shakuntala H. Thilsted
  2. 2. Overview • Why are we interested in dried fish? • Dried fish consumption • An overview of the dried fish sector • Labour in dried fish processing • Trade • Contaminants and food safety • Fish feeds • Conclusion: Where to next?
  3. 3. Why are we interested in dried fish? Percentage of households consuming different types of fish within the last 3 days (Belton et al, 2014)
  4. 4. Two main forms – dried (shutki), fermented (chapa/shidol)
  5. 5. Sold in small quantities (easily divisible, low nominal cost)
  6. 6. Mixed with oils, spices and vegetables (carrier of other nutrients)
  7. 7. Where is dried fish consumed? Annual consumption of dried fish (g/capita) – figures extracted from IFPRI BIHS dataset
  8. 8. Where is dried fish produced?
  9. 9. Main marine species about 85% of total production – loytia, churri, phaisha and many others
  10. 10. Puti is the most important freshwater species dried – mostly used for production of chapa
  11. 11. Fish driers minimize labour costs by employing women, children, some bonded labour, and providing payment in kind
  12. 12. There is a substantial trade in dried fish – at least 20% consumed in Bangladesh is imported
  13. 13. High value products and fermented products (shidol) are exported for consumption by overseas Bangladeshis and East Asian markets
  14. 14. Sharks fins and the stomachs and swim bladders of some large M/FW species are shipped to Hong Kong
  15. 15. Pesticide is often used during drying to prevent maggot infestation
  16. 16. Insecticides are also used during storage to prevent insect damage
  17. 17. Approximately 15% of marine landings which are dried are converted to fish meal
  18. 18. Most fish meal is made from bycatch of crabs and fish not fit for human consumption
  19. 19. Fish meal production does not directly impact food security, but fishing practices may not be sustainable in the long run
  20. 20. Dried fish is a concentrated source of protein, vitamin A and calcium, and is a good source of iron and omega-3 (4kg fresh fish = 1kg dried fish) Dried and fermented fish makes an important contribution to food and nutrition security for consumers in all income groups, but especially important for the poor Conclusions
  21. 21. Conclusions • Dried fish production provides livelihoods and incomes for large numbers of poor people with few alternatives • Better information needed to help sustain the sector’s important role with respect to livelihoods and food security • Further efforts required to develop to viable interventions improve working conditions, food safety and fisheries management
  22. 22. Thank You

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