Farmers in Transition Towards Sustainability: How Can We Speed Up the Process? – a WorldFish perspective

685 views

Published on

Presented by Michael Phillips at the Seafood Summit 2012 in Hong Kong, 8 September, 2012.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
685
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
31
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Farmers in Transition Towards Sustainability: How Can We Speed Up the Process? – a WorldFish perspective

  1. 1. Farmers in Transition Towards Sustainability:How Can We Speed Up the Process? – aWorldFish perspectiveMichael Phillips, Malcolm Beveridge, Wayne Rogers and Steven Hall
  2. 2. Overview•  sustainability ”ambition”•  experiences•  roles and responsibility•  challenges•  moving forward
  3. 3. Where WorldFish is coming from •  reduce poverty and hunger by improving fisheries & aquaculture •  develop and promote aquaculture value chains that: –  produce food that meets poor consumer needs –  help reduce vulnerability of poor producers and others involved in aquaculture value chains –  achieves this without harming the environment and those who depend on it
  4. 4. 120 120 100 100 Growing fisheries (0.7% per annum) Growing fisheries (0.7% per annum) Stagnant fisheries Stagnant fisheries Production forecast (this study) Pig Achieving sector Production (million tonnes)Production (million tonnes) sustainability Production targets (national data) • Global  consumption  rises  to  22.5   kg/y • Global  consumption  rises  to  22.5   kg/y 80 80 Chicken • Global  consumption      remains  at • Global  consumption   remains  at 1996   levels  ((15.6   kg/y) 1996   levels   15.6   kg/y) 60 60 Fish Fish Fish 40 40 •  challenge! •Technological  advances  iin  aquaculture •Technological  advances   n  aquaculture 20 20 •Baseline  scenario •Baseline  scenario •Ecological  collapse  of  ffisheries •Ecological  collapse  of   isheries •  social, economic and 1950 1950 1960 1960 1970 1970 1980 1980 1990 1990 2000 2000 2010 2010 2020 2020 2030 2030 environmental dimensions Year •  multiple approaches Year Ye (1999) IFPRI (2003) (1999) Ye FAO IFPRI (2003) (2004) FAO (2004) Wijkstrom (2003) Wijkstrom (2003) –  certification trajectories as Jonell et al (2012) an example •  inclusive approach considering scales, species and systems •  markets, public and private
  5. 5. Research in development •  Systems, species, value chains •  Geography and people –  country and “hubs” •  Impact and results •  Evidence for outcomes and impact –  noting -- environmentalEastern outcomes poorly documented
  6. 6. Significant opportunity for improvement inenvironmental performance.. within species groups 3x difference
  7. 7. … and between species groups
  8. 8. 2,000,000   Experiences – Aceh revenue  from  all  farmers  (USD$2.39m)  1,800,000  1,600,000   net  profit  from  all  farmers  (USD$1.44m)   $1,804,103   regional approach1,400,000   project  investments  (USD$1.90m)   •  small-scale commercial shrimp1,200,000   $1,148,210   and milkfish1,000,000   800,000   •  bottom of pyramid $726,343   600,000   $527,156   •  farm improvements delivers 400,000   $396,981   $475,464   $233,683   $252,900   economic, social and 200,000   0   $10,126   $3,096   $92,434   $52,546   environmental outcomes 2007   2008   2009   2010   –  aquatic animal disease risk reduced –  pesticide use reduced –  Fish in Fish Out (FIFO) –  water use, habitats •  cooperative business model for 20,000 farmers
  9. 9. Experiences – Cambodia•  sectoral analysis•  scenario setting for 2030•  map high and low impact pathways•  investments needed to support that
  10. 10. Vietnam  -­‐ 1  million  freshwater  fish  farms Challenges •  impacts at scale •  understanding impacts –  sector –  commodity –  local •  “inclusive” approach to sector development •  business not project •  right combination of investment •  organizations
  11. 11. Moving forward (with emphasis on small-scale…)1.  Targeting analysis2.  Investments in transition and improvements3.  “Ecosystem” of tools, knowledge and partners enabling farmers and intermediary organizations4.  Communications and advocacy of effective approaches5.  M&E
  12. 12. M.Phillips@cgiar.org  www.worldfishcenter.org

×