Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Dr Richard Hawkins (University of Wolverhampton)Dr Jamie Wood (University of Manchester)
   Aims of the session     To think about why this is an important issue (more      broadly and for History discipline) ...
 Please spend 5 minutes discussing the theme of  e-learning with the person sitting next to you Think about the followin...
   When is e-Learning particularly appropriate and    effective in HE History teaching?   What are the challenges of usi...
   Access to online resources (e.g. institutional    issues)   Students’ skill levels     Language skills     Mathemat...
   Access to online resources     E-books and e-journals from commercial      publishers are on a subscription basis    ...
   Access to online resources     Although most of the free online resources are     Microsoft compatible there are a fe...
   Language Skills     Non-contemporary English-language resources are      likely to make use of archaic words     Ori...
   Mathematical Literacy     Some countries have placed significant sets of      historical statistical data online such...
   Digital Literacy     There is a false belief that our students are digital      natives and that they will probably b...
   Encourages deeper learning     Primary research      ▪ Engaging with online archives: e.g. American Jewish Committee ...
   Structured design and delivery     Planning and up-front effort are needed     Makes the learning and teaching proce...
 Foregrounding of design: makes pedagogy  explicit Online: easier to share Freely- and widely-available – e.g. Web2.0; ...
   Based on the experiences of the members of    your group, think about the following    questions:     what factors in...
   Cost of commercially available online    resources is potentially a significant issue   However, both public sector a...
   Books, Government Documents and Serials     There are several e-book collections available on a      subscription bas...
   Books, Government Documents and Serials   JISC Historic Books     The following resources are available to UK HEIs o...
   Books, Government Documents and Serials   Internet Archive – www.archive.org     This is a website has been created ...
   Books, Government Documents and Serials   Internet Archive – www.archive.org     In the 19th and 18th centuries copy...
William Fox (1792)
   Books, Government Documents and Serials   Google Books - http://books.google.co.uk/     Although students do make us...
   Books, Government Documents and Serials   Hathi Trust Digital Library - http://www.hathitrust.org/     About 30 per ...
   Digitised Newspapers   British Library Newspapers 1600-1900     This JISC funded resource provides a wide range of  ...
(5HS006) The Social History of Victorian Britain c1850-c1901Component 2: A 2000 word essay on one of the following questio...
   Digitised Newspapers   Library of Congress - Chronicling America -    http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/     This fr...
   Digitised Newspapers   National Library of Singapore – NewspaperSG -    http://newspapers.nl.sg/     This is a free ...
(6HS001) America: The Rise of a Superpower, 1890-1945Assessment Tasks:Component 1 (50%):Choose one of the following:   1....
 Other Resources JISC was referred to earlier. This UK government body has also sought to  make available for teaching ...
(5GK014) Genocide and the Emergence of Modern Human RightsComponent 2 (50%):   Choose one of the following   1. Use the ...
   Discussion boards and blogs:     (group-work) Students discuss and      debate with one another     (interacting wit...
   Google Maps:     (collaboratively) Students create maps of historical      events/ processes by adding ‘tags’ to Goog...
   Seminars on a 1st year    lecture-based module in    History at University of    Sheffield   Social bookmarking: Inte...
   My perception:     Lack of student preparation     Or maybe: lack of engagement with reading, either at      home or...
   Students    tag, describe and    share resources    based on weekly    reading   They then post    questions based on...
   ‘diigo for    educators’ account    – private, separate    logins   Highlighting   Sticky-noting   Sharing
Locating and bookmarking source(s)• Find and bookmark primary/secondary source• Add description and tags                No...
1. Practical use in preparing   essays2. Enjoyed the opportunity to   find own sources3. Freedom: ‘There is more   freedom...
•   ‘it has been good to see what other people     have put and there was probably more     variation in the questions tha...
•   ‘it forces you to think about the source    material and be analytical in response to it’•   ‘it makes you think about...
   Develops range of    ‘generic’ skills    (technology;    information literacy;    research)   Models disciplinary    ...
 GLOs: digital learning objects that can be customised, adapted,  edited or recombined (based on templates at http://glom...
   Teaching Pre-Modern History: E-Learning    Challenges and Opportunities (HEA Insights    Pamphlet): Antonella Luizzo-S...
 Spend 15 minutes as a group designing an e-learning  activity that meets a specific learning objective or  solves a T&L ...
   When is e-Learning particularly appropriate and    effective in HE History teaching?   What are the challenges of usi...
Technology curriculum learning - HEA New to Teach, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, 18th July 2012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Technology curriculum learning - HEA New to Teach, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, 18th July 2012

562 views

Published on

Presentation

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Technology curriculum learning - HEA New to Teach, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, 18th July 2012

  1. 1. Dr Richard Hawkins (University of Wolverhampton)Dr Jamie Wood (University of Manchester)
  2. 2.  Aims of the session  To think about why this is an important issue (more broadly and for History discipline)  To give an overview of technologies that are being used (technology)  To provide some specific examples of how they are being used in teaching (pedagogy)  To encourage you to think about how they relate to your practice (and how you might apply them) Structure of the session
  3. 3.  Please spend 5 minutes discussing the theme of e-learning with the person sitting next to you Think about the following questions:  What are your prior experiences of using e-learning?  What was good about it?  What problems did you encounter?  What more would you like to know? Write down your thoughts on post-it notes (1 per post-it) Be ready to feed back at least one point to the group
  4. 4.  When is e-Learning particularly appropriate and effective in HE History teaching? What are the challenges of using e-learning? What are the benefits? Which technologies are most effective in terms of students’ learning? Which pedagogies are best aligned with e- learning? How do we assess engagement with e-learning? What support is needed to further staff engagement with e-learning?
  5. 5.  Access to online resources (e.g. institutional issues) Students’ skill levels  Language skills  Mathematical literacy  Digital literacy: we shouldn’t expect students to have same digital literacy skills either as we do or as our children do
  6. 6.  Access to online resources  E-books and e-journals from commercial publishers are on a subscription basis  Subscriptions can be cancelled and unlike with traditional paper books and journals virtual bookshelves will then be left bare  So it is potentially bad teaching practice to base an entire reading list on subscription based e- books and e-journal articles
  7. 7.  Access to online resources  Although most of the free online resources are Microsoft compatible there are a few which require the download of non-Microsoft proprietary software which may require permission to breach your institution’s firewall
  8. 8.  Language Skills  Non-contemporary English-language resources are likely to make use of archaic words  Original hand-written manuscripts may be difficult for students who do not hand write on a regular basis to decipher  Some foreign language handwriting, e.g. pre-20th century German, present challenge because many of the characters are significantly different from those used in contemporary handwriting  Students do not necessarily possess language skills necessary to engage with primary sources (e.g. Latin for medieval history)
  9. 9.  Mathematical Literacy  Some countries have placed significant sets of historical statistical data online such as in the case of the United States  However, many students may lack the mathematical literacy to make even low level use of this data such as creating graphs
  10. 10.  Digital Literacy  There is a false belief that our students are digital natives and that they will probably be more skilled than we as teachers or researchers are in engaging with online historical resources  The skills needed to engage with these resources are different from those required to engage with Facebook or create a webpage  Some students lack basic skills such that of knowing how to do a keyword search  Many students are unable to differentiate online resources
  11. 11.  Encourages deeper learning  Primary research ▪ Engaging with online archives: e.g. American Jewish Committee http://www.ajcarchives.org/  Promotes learning outside the classroom  Promotes collaboration  Develops discipline-specific and transferrable skills ▪ Research skills; writing (e.g. in different formats/ registers); information literacy; collaboration; technical/ technological skills Broadened horizons  Enables students to see broader/ social relevance/ applicability of the discipline and of their learning
  12. 12.  Structured design and delivery  Planning and up-front effort are needed  Makes the learning and teaching process more visible  Aids transferability Flexible, asynchronous teaching/ learning  Blended learning – complement rather than replace face-to- face learning Can support a range of pedagogies  Podcasts and YouTube can be used for transmission modes  Possibly aligns better with certain pedagogies ▪ Constructivist approaches – students make meaning/ learning ▪ E.g. inquiry- and problem-based learning; group-work
  13. 13.  Foregrounding of design: makes pedagogy explicit Online: easier to share Freely- and widely-available – e.g. Web2.0; virtual learning environments Resource banks/ open educational resources:  Facilitates sharing of resources/ activities ▪ HEA website resources centre: http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources ▪ JISC learning resources: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/topics/learningresources. aspx ▪ HUMBOX: http://humbox.ac.uk/
  14. 14.  Based on the experiences of the members of your group, think about the following questions:  what factors inhibit student and staff engagement with e-learning/ technology?  what are the benefits of e-learning for staff and students? You have ten minutes Be ready to feed back on the main points of your discussion
  15. 15.  Cost of commercially available online resources is potentially a significant issue However, both public sector and non- governmental organisations are placing ever increasing amounts of historical material online In the case of books and other printed material such as pamphlets there are now a number of websites that provide free resources
  16. 16.  Books, Government Documents and Serials  There are several e-book collections available on a subscription basis. But most of them are not history focussed. Ebrary  However, ProQuest’s Ebrary does include history within its scope.  It is very useful collection which is easy for staff and students to use.  It offers a good selection of history monographs covering a wide range of geographical areas and periods
  17. 17.  Books, Government Documents and Serials JISC Historic Books  The following resources are available to UK HEIs on payment of an annual service fee. ▪ Early English Books Online (EEBO) ▪ The scanned images and (increasingly) full-text digital versions of over 125,000 books published in English up to 1700. ▪ Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) ▪ A digital collection of all the books published in Great Britain and its colonies during the eighteenth century, comprising some 33 million pages from more than 180,000 titles. ▪ Nineteenth Century Books from the British Library Collection ▪ Digitised versions of more than 65,000 first editions from the 19th century, covering philosophy, history, poetry and literature.
  18. 18.  Books, Government Documents and Serials Internet Archive – www.archive.org  This is a website has been created by an American NGO  On this site can be found a wide variety of out of copyright books and pamphlets aggregated from a wide variety of sources including Google Books and Project Gutenberg  While there is material from the 17th century on this site the resources tend to from the collections of North American university and public libraries and so there is a much wider range of material for the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries  So the resources are particularly useful for the teaching of American history
  19. 19.  Books, Government Documents and Serials Internet Archive – www.archive.org  In the 19th and 18th centuries copyright was much weaker and American publishers republished a wide variety of British books and pamphlets  So this website has a lot of useful material relevant to the teaching of 18th and 19th century British history  The downside of this website is that the search engine only does keyword searches of titles  It does not allow a keyword search of the texts
  20. 20. William Fox (1792)
  21. 21.  Books, Government Documents and Serials Google Books - http://books.google.co.uk/  Although students do make use of this website very few of the history books indexed are full view. Project Gutenberg - http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/  Free ancient to modern history ebooks with a wide geographical scope. The Core Historical Literature of Agriculture http://chla.library.cornell.edu/  This is an excellent Cornell University website devoted to the history of agriculture.
  22. 22.  Books, Government Documents and Serials Hathi Trust Digital Library - http://www.hathitrust.org/  About 30 per of the 10 million books, government reports and serials available at this website are full view. The material is mostly North American in focus. Good source for American State government publications. Making of America - http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/moagrp http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/m/moa/  This project which is split between the Universities of Michigan and Cornell is a digitised collection of books and serials published up to 1922 documenting the making of America.
  23. 23.  Digitised Newspapers British Library Newspapers 1600-1900  This JISC funded resource provides a wide range of national, provincial and local newspapers covering the period 1600-1900.  It includes the 17th to 18th century Burney Collection newspapers.  This resource is available free of charge to UK HEIs but unlike most comparable resources in other countries is not free of charge to the public at large.  There is also a further collection of British Library newspapers that is being digitised in collaboration with a private company, brightsolid.  However, the British Newspaper Archive is not a free resource and is only available on a pay per view basis.
  24. 24. (5HS006) The Social History of Victorian Britain c1850-c1901Component 2: A 2000 word essay on one of the following questions (50%). Answer mustinclude material drawn from at least five Victorian newspapers. 1. How much evidence is there for a significant improvement in public health in the Victorian period? 2. Discuss the treatment of the mentally ill in Victorian Britain. 3. How far was the image of the Victorian woman as ‘angel in the house’ a reality? 4. Examine the role of the prostitute in Victorian society. 5. Critically examine newspaper coverage of one of the following: cholera, industrial protest, crime, political conflict, popular culture. 6. What does the Jack the Ripper case tell us about the East End of London in 1888?
  25. 25.  Digitised Newspapers Library of Congress - Chronicling America - http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/  This free resource will include newspapers from every part of the United States covering the period 1837- 1922. National Library of Australia – Trove – http://trove.nla.gov.au/  This free resource will include newspapers from across Australia published between 1803 and the mid-1950s.
  26. 26.  Digitised Newspapers National Library of Singapore – NewspaperSG - http://newspapers.nl.sg/  This is a free digitised collection of Singapore and Malayan newspapers published between 1831 and 2009. There are also a growing number of digitised historic newspaper resources available on a subscription basis. In the case of Britain these newspapers include The Times, The Financial Times, The Daily Mirror, Daily Express and the Glasgow Herald. There are also British sectarian newspapers that have been digitised such as the Jewish Chronicle and the Catholic Herald
  27. 27. (6HS001) America: The Rise of a Superpower, 1890-1945Assessment Tasks:Component 1 (50%):Choose one of the following: 1. Use the Library of Congress Chronicling America website to compare and contrast the reaction of the American press to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. Your examples must include newspapers from New York, District of Columbia, Minnesota, San Francisco and Texas. What do the newspaper articles tell us about the American attitude toward imperialism?* 2. Upton Sinclair’s documentary novel The Jungle (1906) exposing the appalling standards of hygiene in the meat-packing industry played a major role in the successful enactment of a major example of Progressive Era regulatory federal legislation, the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. Use the Library of Congress Chronicling America website to compare and contrast the reaction of the American press to the publication of The Jungle and the enactment of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. Your examples must include newspapers from New York, District of Columbia, Minnesota, San Francisco and Texas.** USE A MINIMUM OF TWO ARTICLES FROM EACH CITY, DISTRICT, OR STATE
  28. 28.  Other Resources JISC was referred to earlier. This UK government body has also sought to make available for teaching a wide range of historical resources including pictures and newsfilm at http://jiscmediahub.ac.uk/ Visual media relating to the history of United States and Australia are available respectively at the following two sites: http://www.loc.gov/library/libarch-digital.html http://trove.nla.gov.au/
  29. 29. (5GK014) Genocide and the Emergence of Modern Human RightsComponent 2 (50%): Choose one of the following 1. Use the news films available on the JISC MediaHub website to identify news reports relating to one of the genocide case studies covered in the lectures. Use the news reports to assess the role played by the media in publicizing genocide. Did the publicity have a positive impact? 2. Critically analyse the operations of ONE of the major international war crimes tribunals (Yugoslavia and Rwanda). Have they been successful?
  30. 30.  Discussion boards and blogs:  (group-work) Students discuss and debate with one another  (interacting with lecturer) Students ask questions and offer feedback, especially useful for revision  (individually) Students reflect on their learning or complete specific tasks on a weekly basis  (collaboratively) Students pose questions on a weekly basis that are used to structure
  31. 31.  Google Maps:  (collaboratively) Students create maps of historical events/ processes by adding ‘tags’ to Google Maps and annotating them: The Spread of Lutheranism (1 seminar) Wikis, blogs and Google Sites:  (individually or collaboratively) Students create a website: Women in the Middle East (seminar series) Social bookmarking:  (collaboratively) Students create a resource list (online bibliography) for a module/ seminar (seminar series)
  32. 32.  Seminars on a 1st year lecture-based module in History at University of Sheffield Social bookmarking: Internet users manage bookmarks of web pages using tags/ descriptions, not folders Active engagement – the students have to do something Online/ social element enables collaboration and sharing
  33. 33.  My perception:  Lack of student preparation  Or maybe: lack of engagement with reading, either at home or in class Result:  Difficult to plan seminars and to carry them out  Over preparation; formulaic and rigid structure; double preparation Solution:  Use active learning – i.e. require the students to do something outside class that I could see  Students provide me with the materials/ questions to plan seminars using social bookmarking
  34. 34.  Students tag, describe and share resources based on weekly reading They then post questions based on reading to discussion forum I use resources and questions to plan seminars
  35. 35.  ‘diigo for educators’ account – private, separate logins Highlighting Sticky-noting Sharing
  36. 36. Locating and bookmarking source(s)• Find and bookmark primary/secondary source• Add description and tags Non-written sources • Find and bookmark a non- written source (YouTube; Essay writing Flickr) • Respond to feedback on • In description, explain why essays by bookmarking a this source is relevant to the relevant site seminar • Revise thesis statement from first essay and post to discussion forum Highlighting • Highlight and comment on relevant sections of a document which I had pre-selectedQuestioning (weekly)• Post a question based on readingto the discussion forum
  37. 37. 1. Practical use in preparing essays2. Enjoyed the opportunity to find own sources3. Freedom: ‘There is more freedom of choice about what to read’4. Different way of learning: ‘it is much more interesting, and because you are not only reading, it is easier to absorb information’.
  38. 38. • ‘it has been good to see what other people have put and there was probably more variation in the questions than if the tutor was to set them.’ • ‘it allows you to see a wider range of issues that come up from sources - some that you may not even have thought about.’+ 12 out of 15 students felt that their research skills had improved
  39. 39. • ‘it forces you to think about the source material and be analytical in response to it’• ‘it makes you think about what youre reading a lot more, and opens up the area of reading to different paths of thought.’• Taking charge of learning: ‘I used to prefer having the questions set for me but I think it has been more useful setting them myself as it has made me think about the reading more.’
  40. 40.  Develops range of ‘generic’ skills (technology; information literacy; research) Models disciplinary processes and develops disciplinary skills (summarising; using sources) and knowledge – reading occurs
  41. 41.  GLOs: digital learning objects that can be customised, adapted, edited or recombined (based on templates at http://glomaker.org/) DIY: we developed 2 GLOs based on the Evaluating Multiple Interpretations (EMI) template  Students presented with images and information about a physical object  Students complete various questions/ activities  EMI revolves around audio footage of experts offering their interpretations of various aspects of the physical object. Here are two examples
  42. 42.  Teaching Pre-Modern History: E-Learning Challenges and Opportunities (HEA Insights Pamphlet): Antonella Luizzo-Scorpo and Jamie WoodComing slightly less soon: an overview of e- learning provision in UK HE History teaching, drawing on research with students and staff at 5-6 institutions
  43. 43.  Spend 15 minutes as a group designing an e-learning activity that meets a specific learning objective or solves a T&L problem Your activity must 1. Involve students engaging with a historical source online 2. Incorporate technology to support the process of learning Be ready to feedback (using technology, maybe...) on the following:  What objective/ problem are you addressing?  What will the students do (i.e. how they will engage with the technology)?
  44. 44.  When is e-Learning particularly appropriate and effective in HE History teaching? What are the challenges of using e-learning? What are the benefits? Which technologies are most effective in terms of students’ learning? Which pedagogies are best aligned with e- learning? How do we assess engagement with e-learning? What support is needed to further staff engagement with e-learning?

×