Bytautaite M Power Point

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Feminism in Virginia Woolf's writings

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Bytautaite M Power Point

  1. 1. Feminism in Virginia Woolf’s Writings<br />By Monika Bytautaite<br />English 102<br />Professor Owens<br />
  2. 2. Feminism: correct definition <br />Feminism has been viewed negatively due to misunderstanding what it really is<br />Two branches of feminism<br />Equity Feminism<br /> Equal rights for women<br />Social Feminism<br />Equal rights +<br /> embracing femininity<br />
  3. 3. Social Feminism and Virginia Woolf<br />Most (if not all) of Virginia Woolf’s works are influenced by social feminism<br />While some are subtle (ex. Mrs. Dalloway) others are more forward (ex. A Room of One’s Own)<br />
  4. 4. Feminism in Mrs. Dalloway<br />Main character Clarissa Dalloway not typical feminist heroine:<br />her character is &quot;saturated with her feminine nature” (Sharma 64)<br />embraces life<br />belongs to elite English high-society<br />married<br />
  5. 5. Femininity vs. Masculinity<br />In Mrs. Dalloway, masculine characters are <br /> unhappy and dissatisfied with life, lack creativity<br />Examples: Septimus, Peter Walsh, Mr. Dalloway<br />
  6. 6. Femininity vs. Masculinity continued<br />Clarissa Dalloway is able to achieve internal balance due to her feminine characteristics<br />Septimus masculine nature responsible for his unhappiness and suicide<br />
  7. 7. A Room of One’s Own<br />An obvious feminist writing addressing women<br />Addresses importance of education for women<br />Calls to celebrate femininity<br />Urges women to be independent<br />Independence can be achieved by having her own room and sufficient income<br />
  8. 8. Shakespeare’s sister Judith<br />Fictional character invented to prove<br /> Ms. Woolf point<br />Shakespeare’s talented sister<br />Unlike Shakespeare, she is denied proper education and family support<br />Dies tragically without getting a chance<br /> to achieve her dreams<br />
  9. 9. Importance of Acknowledging Differences Between Women and Men<br />“can inspire social and political transformation” (DiBattista 86) for a better world not only for women but also for men<br />
  10. 10. Works Cited<br />DiBattista, Maria &quot;Woolf as Feminist.&quot; English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 49.1 (2006): 85-88. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 15 Nov. 2009.<br />Sharma, O.P. &quot;Feminism as aesthetic vision: A study of Virginia Woolf&apos;s &apos;Mrs. Dalloway&apos;.&quot; Women&apos;s Studies 3.1 (1975): 61. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 15 Nov. 2009.<br />

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