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Plato and Rousseau on Education

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A quick and dirty introduction to Plato's and Rousseau's views on education.

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Plato and Rousseau on Education

  1. 1. What implications do Plato’s and Rousseau’s views on education have for how we ought to understand the aims of education, the respective roles of the learner and the teacher, the processes and environment of education, and the evaluation of teaching and learning?
  2. 2. PLATO The Republic JEAN-JACQUES ROUSSEAU Émile, or On Education AIMS TEACHER L LEARNER PROCESSES AND ENVIRONMENT J K L EVALUATION
  3. 3. THE ALLEGORY OF THE CAVE PLATO The Republic ARTISANS. APPETITES. WARRIORS. SPIRIT. GUARDIANS. INTELLECT. JUSTICE VIRTUE EUDAIMONIA NATURAL FIT
  4. 4. INFANCY (0 – 2) CHILDHOOD (2 – 12) PUBERTY (15 – 20) Raised in rural isolation, with only his nurse, his tutor and his servants. Education from things Introduction to society MANHOOD (20 – 22) Education from man ROUSSEAU. ÉMILE. “How might we make Émile happy, self-sufficient and free within the existing social order?” THREE SOURCES OF EDUCATION: FROM NATURE, FROM MAN, AND FROM THINGS. PRE-PUBESCENCE (12 – 15)
  5. 5. INFANCY (0 – 2) CHILDHOOD (2 – 12) PUBERTY (15 – 20) Raised in rural isolation, with only his nurse, his tutor and his servants. Education from things Set the groundwork for forming the learner’s judgement. Develop sense perception. Introduction to society MANHOOD (20 – 22) Education from man ROUSSEAU. ÉMILE. “How might we make Émile happy, self-sufficient and free within the existing social order?” THREE SOURCES OF EDUCATION: FROM NATURE, FROM MAN, AND FROM THINGS. PRE-PUBESCENCE (12 – 15)
  6. 6. INFANCY (0 – 2) CHILDHOOD (2 – 12) PUBERTY (15 – 20) Raised in rural isolation, with only his nurse, his tutor and his servants. Education from things Set the groundwork for forming the learner’s judgement. Develop sense perception. Age of reason Natural sciences and a trade Introduction to society MANHOOD (20 – 22) Education from man ROUSSEAU. ÉMILE. “How might we make Émile happy, self-sufficient and free within the existing social order?” THREE SOURCES OF EDUCATION: FROM NATURE, FROM MAN, AND FROM THINGS. PRE-PUBESCENCE (12 – 15)
  7. 7. INFANCY (0 – 2) CHILDHOOD (2 – 12) PUBERTY (15 – 20) Raised in rural isolation, with only his nurse, his tutor and his servants. Education from things Set the groundwork for forming the learner’s judgement. Develop sense perception. Age of reason Natural sciences and a trade Self-love Introduction to society Put body and mind together to complete the man (a loving and feeling being). MANHOOD (20 – 22) Restrain sexual desires Develop compassion for the less fortunate and the historical greats. “Only I am happy.” Sexual education Recognise own weaknesses Go to Paris and look for Sophie Chooses to be tutored Education from man ROUSSEAU. ÉMILE. “How might we make Émile happy, self-sufficient and free within the existing social order?” THREE SOURCES OF EDUCATION: FROM NATURE, FROM MAN, AND FROM THINGS. PRE-PUBESCENCE (12 – 15)
  8. 8. INFANCY (0 – 2) CHILDHOOD (2 – 12) PUBERTY (15 – 20) Raised in rural isolation, with only his nurse, his tutor and his servants. Education from things Set the groundwork for forming the learner’s judgement. Develop sense perception. Age of reason Natural sciences and a trade Self-love Introduction to society Put body and mind together to complete the man (a loving and feeling being). MANHOOD (20 – 22) Restrain sexual desires Develop compassion for the less fortunate and the historical greats. “Only I am happy.” Sexual education Recognise own weaknesses Go to Paris and look for Sophie Chooses to be tutored Education from man Finds Sophie Learns to be virtuous (weak by nature, strong by will) ROUSSEAU. ÉMILE. “How might we make Émile happy, self-sufficient and free within the existing social order?” THREE SOURCES OF EDUCATION: FROM NATURE, FROM MAN, AND FROM THINGS. PRE-PUBESCENCE (12 – 15)
  9. 9. INFANCY (0 – 2) CHILDHOOD (2 – 12) PUBERTY (15 – 20) Raised in rural isolation, with only his nurse, his tutor and his servants. Education from things Set the groundwork for forming the learner’s judgement. Develop sense perception. Age of reason Natural sciences and a trade Self-love Introduction to society Put body and mind together to complete the man (a loving and feeling being). MANHOOD (20 – 22) Restrain sexual desires Develop compassion for the less fortunate and the historical greats. “Only I am happy.” Sexual education Recognise own weaknesses Go to Paris and look for Sophie Chooses to be tutored Education from man Finds Sophie Learns to be virtuous (weak by nature, strong by will) ROUSSEAU. ÉMILE. “How might we make Émile happy, self-sufficient and free within the existing social order?” THREE SOURCES OF EDUCATION: FROM NATURE, FROM MAN, AND FROM THINGS. PRE-PUBESCENCE (12 – 15) NO RULESNO PUNISHMENTS. NO REWARDS. LEARN BY DOING. LEARN THROUGH OBSERVATIONS AND INQUIRY.
  10. 10. REFERENCES Williams, I. (2010). Plato and Education. In Bailey, R., Barrow, R., Carr, D., & McCarthy, C. (eds.), The Sage Handbook of Philosophy of Education. London: Sage Publications, pp. 69–83. Martin, J., & Martin, N. (2010) Rousseau’s ‘Émile‘ and Educational Legacy. In Bailey, R., Barrow, R., Carr, D., & McCarthy, C. (eds.), The Sage Handbook of Philosophy of Education. London: Sage Publications, pp. 85–98.

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