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MILLER/SPOOLMAN    LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT             17TH                  Chapter 22                  Cities and Sust...
Half of the World’s People Live in             Urban Areas (1)• Urbanization  • Creation and growth of urban and suburban ...
Half of the World’s People Live in             Urban Areas (2)• Push factors   •   Poverty   •   Lack of land to grow food...
Half of the World’s People Live in             Urban Areas (3)• Four major trends  1. Proportion of global population livi...
Urban Shanghai, Suburban Southern California,             and Rural Malawi                                        Fig. 22-...
Urban Population Growth                          Fig. 22-3, p. 588
Global Outlook: Satellite Image of Major Urban        Areas Throughout the World                                         F...
Typical Daily Traffic Jam of People, Carts, and        Other Vehicles in Delhi, India                                     ...
Major Urban Areas in the United States Revealed by Satellite Images at Night                                     Fig. 22-6...
Urban Sprawl Gobbles Up the Countryside                 (1) • Urban sprawl    • Low-density development at edges of cities...
Urban Sprawl Gobbles Up the Countryside                 (2) • Megalopolis   • Bowash – Boston to Washington 800 mile urban...
Urban Sprawl in and around the U.S. City of Las     Vegas, Nevada, from 1973 to 2000                                      ...
Urbanization Has Advantages (1)• Centers of:   •   Economic development   •   Innovation   •   Education   •   Technologic...
Urbanization Has Advantages (2)• Urban residents tend to have   •   Longer lives   •   Lower infant mortality   •   Better...
Urbanization Has Disadvantages (1)•   Huge ecological footprints•   Lack vegetation•   Water problems•   Concentrate pollu...
Life Is a Desperate Struggle for the Urban Poor           in Less-Developed Countries • Slums • Squatter settlements/shant...
Global Outlook: Extreme Poverty in Rio de              Janeiro Slum                                      Fig. 22-11, p. 596
Photochemical Smog in Mexico City                               Fig. 22-12, p. 597
Cities Can Grow Outward or Upward• Compact cities   • Hong Kong, China   • Tokyo, Japan   • Mass transit• Dispersed cities...
Motor Vehicles Have Advantages and         Disadvantages (1)• Advantages  • Mobility and convenience  • Jobs in     • Prod...
Motor Vehicles Have Advantages and         Disadvantages (2)• Disadvantages  •   Accidents: 1.2 million per year, 15 milli...
Los Angeles Freeways                       Fig. 22-13, p. 599
Reducing Automobile Use Is Not Easy, but           It Can Be Done (1) • Full-cost pricing: high gasoline taxes    •   Educ...
Reducing Automobile Use Is Not Easy, but           It Can Be Done (2) • Raise parking fees • Tolls on roads, tunnels, and ...
Case Study: Zipcars• Car-sharing network• Rent by the hour• Saves money for many people
Some Cities Are Promoting Alternatives to             Car Ownership • Bicycles • Heavy-rail systems • Light-rail systems •...
Potential Routes for High-Speed BulletTrains in the U.S. and Parts of Canada                                   Fig. 22-18,...
Conventional Land-Use Planning• Land-use planning   • Encourages future population growth   • Encourages economic developm...
Smart Growth Works (1)• Smart growth  • Reduces dependence    on cars  • Controls and directs    sprawl  • Cuts wasteful r...
Case Study: Smart Growth in Portland,              Oregon• Since 1975   •   Population grew 50%   •   Urban area expanded ...
Preserving and Using Open Space• Urban growth boundary   • U.S. states: Washington, Oregon, and Tennessee• Municipal parks...
Central Park, New York City, USA                                   Fig. 22-20, p. 605
New Urbanism Is Growing• Conventional housing development• Cluster development• New urbanism, old villageism   •   Walkabi...
Undeveloped land           Creek                   Marsh                                   Fig. 22-21a, p. 606
Typical housingdevelopment                  Fig. 22-21b, p. 606
ClusterCluster housing                    Creekdevelopment                                    Cluster                  Pon...
Case Study: New Urban Village of                Vauban• Suburb of Freiburg, Germany• Car use heavily discouraged with high...
The Ecocity Concept: Cities for              People Not Cars• Ecocities or green cities   •   Build and redesign for peopl...
Science Focus: Urban Indoor Farming• Rooftop greenhouses  • Sun Works: designs energy-efficient greenhouses• Hydroponic ga...
Case Study: A Living Building• Living Building   • Designed to fit in with local climate, vegetation, other     characteri...
Omega Center for Sustainable Living in       Rhinebeck, New York                                   Fig. 22-22, p. 609
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Bio 105 Chapter 22

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Bio 105 Chapter 22

  1. 1. MILLER/SPOOLMAN LIVING IN THE ENVIRONMENT 17TH Chapter 22 Cities and Sustainability
  2. 2. Half of the World’s People Live in Urban Areas (1)• Urbanization • Creation and growth of urban and suburban areas • Percentage of people who live in such areas• Urban growth • Rate of increase of urban populations • Immigration from rural areas • Pushed from rural areas to urban areas • Pulled to urban areas from rural areas
  3. 3. Half of the World’s People Live in Urban Areas (2)• Push factors • Poverty • Lack of land to grow food • Declining labor market in agriculture • War, famine, conflicts• Pull factors • Jobs, food, housing • Education • Health care
  4. 4. Half of the World’s People Live in Urban Areas (3)• Four major trends 1. Proportion of global population living in urban areas is increasing 2. Number and size of urban areas is mushrooming • Megacities, hypercities 3. Urban growth slower in developed countries 4. Poverty is becoming increasingly urbanized; mostly in less-developed countries
  5. 5. Urban Shanghai, Suburban Southern California, and Rural Malawi Fig. 22-2, p. 588
  6. 6. Urban Population Growth Fig. 22-3, p. 588
  7. 7. Global Outlook: Satellite Image of Major Urban Areas Throughout the World Fig. 22-4, p. 589
  8. 8. Typical Daily Traffic Jam of People, Carts, and Other Vehicles in Delhi, India Fig. 22-5, p. 589
  9. 9. Major Urban Areas in the United States Revealed by Satellite Images at Night Fig. 22-6, p. 590
  10. 10. Urban Sprawl Gobbles Up the Countryside (1) • Urban sprawl • Low-density development at edges of cities/towns • Contributing factors to urban sprawl in the U.S. 1. Ample land 2. Low-cost gasoline; highways 3. Tax laws encouraged home ownership 4. State and local zoning laws 5. Multiple political jurisdictions: poor urban planning
  11. 11. Urban Sprawl Gobbles Up the Countryside (2) • Megalopolis • Bowash – Boston to Washington 800 mile urban area • Caused many environmental and economic problems
  12. 12. Urban Sprawl in and around the U.S. City of Las Vegas, Nevada, from 1973 to 2000 Fig. 22-7, p. 591
  13. 13. Urbanization Has Advantages (1)• Centers of: • Economic development • Innovation • Education • Technological advances • Jobs • Industry, commerce, transportation
  14. 14. Urbanization Has Advantages (2)• Urban residents tend to have • Longer lives • Lower infant mortality • Better medical care • Better social services • More recycling programs• Concentrating people in cities can help preserve biodiversity in rural areas
  15. 15. Urbanization Has Disadvantages (1)• Huge ecological footprints• Lack vegetation• Water problems• Concentrate pollution and health problems• Excessive noise• Altered climate and experience light pollution
  16. 16. Life Is a Desperate Struggle for the Urban Poor in Less-Developed Countries • Slums • Squatter settlements/shantytowns • Terrible living conditions • Lack basic water and sanitation • High levels of pollution • What can governments do to help?
  17. 17. Global Outlook: Extreme Poverty in Rio de Janeiro Slum Fig. 22-11, p. 596
  18. 18. Photochemical Smog in Mexico City Fig. 22-12, p. 597
  19. 19. Cities Can Grow Outward or Upward• Compact cities • Hong Kong, China • Tokyo, Japan • Mass transit• Dispersed cities • U.S. and Canada • Car-centered cities
  20. 20. Motor Vehicles Have Advantages and Disadvantages (1)• Advantages • Mobility and convenience • Jobs in • Production and repair of vehicles • Supplying fuel • Building roads • Status symbol
  21. 21. Motor Vehicles Have Advantages and Disadvantages (2)• Disadvantages • Accidents: 1.2 million per year, 15 million injured • Kill 50 million animals per year • Largest source of outdoor air pollution • Helped create urban sprawl • Traffic congestion
  22. 22. Los Angeles Freeways Fig. 22-13, p. 599
  23. 23. Reducing Automobile Use Is Not Easy, but It Can Be Done (1) • Full-cost pricing: high gasoline taxes • Educate consumers first • Use funds for mass transit • Opposition from car owners and industry • Lack of good public transit is a problem • Rapid mass transit • Difficult to pass in the United States • Strong public opposition • Dispersed nature of the U.S.
  24. 24. Reducing Automobile Use Is Not Easy, but It Can Be Done (2) • Raise parking fees • Tolls on roads, tunnels, and bridges into major cities • Charge a fee to drive into a major city • Car-sharing
  25. 25. Case Study: Zipcars• Car-sharing network• Rent by the hour• Saves money for many people
  26. 26. Some Cities Are Promoting Alternatives to Car Ownership • Bicycles • Heavy-rail systems • Light-rail systems • Buses • Rapid-rail system between urban areas
  27. 27. Potential Routes for High-Speed BulletTrains in the U.S. and Parts of Canada Fig. 22-18, p. 602
  28. 28. Conventional Land-Use Planning• Land-use planning • Encourages future population growth • Encourages economic development • Revenues: property taxes • 90% of local government revenue in the U.S. • Environmental and social consequences• Zoning • Problems and potential benefits • Mixed-use zoning
  29. 29. Smart Growth Works (1)• Smart growth • Reduces dependence on cars • Controls and directs sprawl • Cuts wasteful resource • Uses zoning laws to channel growth
  30. 30. Case Study: Smart Growth in Portland, Oregon• Since 1975 • Population grew 50% • Urban area expanded 2% • Efficient light-rail and bus system • Abundant green space and parks • Clustered, mixed-use neighborhoods • Air pollution reduced 86%• Greenest city in the United States
  31. 31. Preserving and Using Open Space• Urban growth boundary • U.S. states: Washington, Oregon, and Tennessee• Municipal parks • U.S. cities: New York City and San Francisco• Greenbelts – area surrounding cities • Canadian cities: Vancouver and Toronto • Western European cities
  32. 32. Central Park, New York City, USA Fig. 22-20, p. 605
  33. 33. New Urbanism Is Growing• Conventional housing development• Cluster development• New urbanism, old villageism • Walkability • Mixed-use and diversity • Quality urban design • Environmental sustainability • Smart transportation
  34. 34. Undeveloped land Creek Marsh Fig. 22-21a, p. 606
  35. 35. Typical housingdevelopment Fig. 22-21b, p. 606
  36. 36. ClusterCluster housing Creekdevelopment Cluster Pond Fig. 22-21c, p. 606
  37. 37. Case Study: New Urban Village of Vauban• Suburb of Freiburg, Germany• Car use heavily discouraged with high parking fees = $40,000 for a parking space• All homes within walking distance of • Trains and other public transit • Stores, banks, restaurants, schools• Much use of renewable energy
  38. 38. The Ecocity Concept: Cities for People Not Cars• Ecocities or green cities • Build and redesign for people • Use renewable energy resources • Recycle and purify water • Use energy and matter resources efficiently • Prevent pollution and reduce waste • Recycle, reuse and compost municipal waste • Protect and support biodiversity • Urban gardens; farmers markets • Zoning and other tools for sustainability
  39. 39. Science Focus: Urban Indoor Farming• Rooftop greenhouses • Sun Works: designs energy-efficient greenhouses• Hydroponic gardens• Skyscraper farms• Ecological advantages and disadvantages
  40. 40. Case Study: A Living Building• Living Building • Designed to fit in with local climate, vegetation, other characteristics • Energy met solely by renewable resources • Capture, treat, reuse all water • Highly energy efficient • Esthetically pleasing
  41. 41. Omega Center for Sustainable Living in Rhinebeck, New York Fig. 22-22, p. 609

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