Using Raster Math to Assess Wetland Functional Capacity Based on Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) Classification Justin Hawley March ...
Wetland Functional Capacity Assessment  <ul><li>Rapid Assessment  for short </li></ul><ul><li>Released in 1998 </li></ul><...
Analyzing Wetland Functional Capacity REQUIRED BY:  Clean Water Act: Section 404 Wetland Conservation Act OTHER ALLOWED ME...
Wetland Classification Types  Circular 39 Classifications:  Type I, Type II, etc… Cowardian Classifications (NWI):  PEMA, ...
Wetland Classification Types  Lacustrine Fringe Lacustrine Fringe Flats Flats Floodplain Riverine  Not Present in CCWD Slo...
Hydrogeomorphic Classification Wetland type based on Hydric Soils * <ul><li>Why?   </li></ul><ul><li>NWI delineated from <...
 
Functional Analyses <ul><li>Modification of  Ground Water Discharge   (5 inputs) </li></ul><ul><li>Modification of  Ground...
One Example:  Ground Water Discharge <ul><li>PRIMARY VARIABLES </li></ul><ul><li>TYPE  SOURCE   </li></ul><ul><li>pH.……………...
<ul><li>Soil Type………………………………..…………….Soil Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Input/Output Classification……………….NWI (adjusted) </li><...
<ul><li>pH:  </li></ul><ul><li>Input/Output Classification: </li></ul><ul><li>Surface Geology: </li></ul><ul><li>Wetland R...
Values entered  Manually (1, 2, 3). Values entered manually  for the input variable (pH, Soil Type, Regime, etc…).
Bogs Depressions / Swales Flats Floodplain Lacustrine Ground Water Discharge pH I/O Class Surface Geology Wetland Regime S...
Raster Math
 
Reclassification Low / Medium / High
Benefits <ul><li>Scalable :   Survey area size and dimension does not affect outcome. </li></ul><ul><li>Portable :   Metho...
Thank you. Questions? 763-755-0975 Justin Hawley March –  GIS Specialist  Flat Rock Geographics [email_address] Tim Kelly ...
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11B – USING RASTER MATH TO ASSESS WETLAND FUNCTIONALITY CAPACITY BASED ON HYDROGEOMORPHIC (HGM) CLASSIFICATION

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Justin Hawley March, GIS Rangers
To better assess relationships within a wetland, GIS Rangers, in partnership with the Coon Creek Watershed District, has
developed a geoprocessing method that analyzes wetland functional capacity with the use of readily available inputs.
This method can be deployed in almost any environment, and examines the overall relationship between all wetland
components, rather than individual components by themselves.The method utilizes the process put forth in “A Rapid
Procedure for Assessing Wetland Functional Capacity base on Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) Classification” by Dennis W.
Magee. In this process, individual variables of the environment are analyzed and evaluated in terms of the type of
landscape they are found in.These individual variables are then assigned a value dependent not only upon the
landscape position, but upon the type of preliminary analysis being done. Preliminary analyses put forward in the HGM
method include groundwater recharge, wildlife abundance, storm water storage, and several others. Once the preliminary
analyses are performed to get separate, independent, functional valuations, the individual analyses are then easily
summed into a total functional capacity. In terms of GIS processing, the method utilizes readily-available vector files
such as the National Wetland Inventory, the NRCS Soil Survey, as well as localized data such as elevation and land use.
These vector files are evaluated and categorized into types denoted by the “Rapid Assessment Procedure.”The types are
then assigned a “Functional Value” (Generally a value between 1 and 3).With the Functional Value established, these
vector files are converted to raster format.These raster files are then “added” together with the use of raster math giving a summarized functional value for each pixel.This approach combines the benefits of scalability, portability and modularity to accomplish the evaluation of functional capacity of a given wetland, watershed, or region.

Edited presentation from the one given at the Wisconsin Land Information Association 2012 conference to be able to upload. Please feel free to contact us using the phone numbers or email addresses listed in the presentation to ask questions, discuss, or criticize.

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11B – USING RASTER MATH TO ASSESS WETLAND FUNCTIONALITY CAPACITY BASED ON HYDROGEOMORPHIC (HGM) CLASSIFICATION

  1. 1. Using Raster Math to Assess Wetland Functional Capacity Based on Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) Classification Justin Hawley March – GIS Specialist Flat Rock Geographics [email_address] Tim Kelly – Administrator Coon Creek Watershed District [email_address] Image Removed
  2. 2. Wetland Functional Capacity Assessment <ul><li>Rapid Assessment for short </li></ul><ul><li>Released in 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>Developed from: US Army COE </li></ul><ul><li>1992; Smith, Brinson </li></ul><ul><li>Available from The Association </li></ul><ul><li>of State Wetland Managers </li></ul><ul><li>http://aswm.org/ </li></ul>
  3. 3. Analyzing Wetland Functional Capacity REQUIRED BY: Clean Water Act: Section 404 Wetland Conservation Act OTHER ALLOWED METHODS: Minnesota Routine Assessment Methodology for Evaluating Wetland Function (MnRAM) Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET) Wetland Evaluation Methodology (WEM)
  4. 4. Wetland Classification Types Circular 39 Classifications: Type I, Type II, etc… Cowardian Classifications (NWI): PEMA, PEM/SS1Bd, PUBFx, etc…
  5. 5. Wetland Classification Types Lacustrine Fringe Lacustrine Fringe Flats Flats Floodplain Riverine Not Present in CCWD Slope Wetlands Depressions & Swales Depressional Wetlands Bogs Extensive Peatland CCWD Adjustments (MN) Hydrogeomorphic Classification (US) Constants
  6. 6. Hydrogeomorphic Classification Wetland type based on Hydric Soils * <ul><li>Why? </li></ul><ul><li>NWI delineated from </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1979-1988 aerials </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Land use changes </li></ul><ul><li>Agricultural cultivation </li></ul>* for the most part.
  7. 8. Functional Analyses <ul><li>Modification of Ground Water Discharge (5 inputs) </li></ul><ul><li>Modification of Ground Water Recharge </li></ul><ul><li>(6 inputs) </li></ul><ul><li>Storm and Flood Water Storage </li></ul><ul><li>(7 inputs) </li></ul><ul><li>Modification of Stream Flow </li></ul><ul><li>(GW Recharge x Storm & Flood Water Storage) </li></ul><ul><li>Modification of Water Quality </li></ul><ul><li> (6 inputs) </li></ul><ul><li>Contribution to Abundance and Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>of Wetland Vegetation (5 inputs) </li></ul><ul><li>Contribution to Abundance and Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>of Wetland Fauna (11 inputs) </li></ul>
  8. 9. One Example: Ground Water Discharge <ul><li>PRIMARY VARIABLES </li></ul><ul><li>TYPE SOURCE </li></ul><ul><li>pH.……………………………………………………...Soil Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Input/Output Classification……………….NWI (adjusted) </li></ul><ul><li>Surface Geology…………………………………….Soil Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Wetland Regime………………………………NWI (adjusted) </li></ul><ul><li>Soil Type………………………………..…………….Soil Survey </li></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>Soil Type………………………………..…………….Soil Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Input/Output Classification……………….NWI (adjusted) </li></ul><ul><li>pH….…………………………………………………...Soil Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Surface Geology…………………………………….Soil Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Wetland Regime………………………………NWI (adjusted) </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>pH: </li></ul><ul><li>Input/Output Classification: </li></ul><ul><li>Surface Geology: </li></ul><ul><li>Wetland Regime: </li></ul><ul><li>Soil Type: </li></ul>Alkaline / Neutral / Acid Alkaline ( Rondeau Muck. pH = 7.4 - 8.0 ) Neutral ( Millerville Mucky Peat, etc. pH = 6.5 – 7.3 ) Acid ( Sartell Sands, Isan Loam, etc. pH = 4.5 – 6.5 ) Perennial Inlet/Outlet Intermittent Inlet/Outlet High Permeability ( Sandy soils ) Low Permeability ( Muck, Peat, Marsh ) Wet ( NWI Mods E, F, G, & H ) Dry ( NWI Mods A,B, & C ) Histisol Mineral Hydric
  11. 12. Values entered Manually (1, 2, 3). Values entered manually for the input variable (pH, Soil Type, Regime, etc…).
  12. 13. Bogs Depressions / Swales Flats Floodplain Lacustrine Ground Water Discharge pH I/O Class Surface Geology Wetland Regime Soil Type Alkaline Neutral Acid 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 3 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 0 2 3 3 3 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 0 2 0 2 2 Perennial in/outlet Dry Histiols Mineral Hydric Wet Intermittent in/outlet Low permeability High permeability
  13. 14. Raster Math
  14. 16. Reclassification Low / Medium / High
  15. 17. Benefits <ul><li>Scalable : Survey area size and dimension does not affect outcome. </li></ul><ul><li>Portable : Method can be used in any area accounted for in with the HGM classification (North America). </li></ul><ul><li>Modular : More accurate data can easily be adapted into the inputs for greater localized assessment. </li></ul>
  16. 18. Thank you. Questions? 763-755-0975 Justin Hawley March – GIS Specialist Flat Rock Geographics [email_address] Tim Kelly – Administrator Coon Creek Watershed District [email_address]

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