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Refined guidance for implementation of land degradation neutrality, under objective 1 (ICCD/COP(14)/CST/2)

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Agenda Item 2: Items resulting from the work programme of the Science-Policy Interface for the biennium 2018–2019

14th Session of the Committee on Science and Technology New Delhi, India 3 September 2019

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Refined guidance for implementation of land degradation neutrality, under objective 1 (ICCD/COP(14)/CST/2)

  1. 1. 1 Refined guidance for implementation of land degradation neutrality, under objective 1 (ICCD/COP(14)/CST/2) Agenda Item 2: Items resulting from the work programme of the Science-Policy Interface for the biennium 2018–2019 14th Session of the CommiOee on Science and Technology New Delhi, India 3 September 2019
  2. 2. Provide advice on the design and implementa3on of LDN- related policies and ini2a2ves that bring about mul2ple environmental and development benefits and synergies with other Rio conven3ons, in par3cular for climate change adapta3on and mi3ga3on ac3ons. Background – Policy context SPI addressed soil organic carbon, as a pivotal factor contributing to multiple environmental and development benefits with the biggest gaps in measuring and monitoring
  3. 3. SPI sub-objective 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil
  4. 4. SPI sub-objective 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to multifunctional benefits from sustainable land management (SLM)
  5. 5. SPI sub-objec-ve 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to mul-func-onal benefits from sustainable land management (SLM)
  6. 6. SPI sub-objective 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to multifunctional benefits from sustainable land management (SLM)
  7. 7. SPI sub-objective 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to multifunctional benefits from sustainable land management (SLM)
  8. 8. SPI sub-objective 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to multifunctional benefits from sustainable land management (SLM)
  9. 9. SPI sub-objec-ve 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to mul-func-onal benefits from sustainable land management (SLM)
  10. 10. SPI sub-objective 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to multifunctional benefits from sustainable land management (SLM) è Can be achieved through (SLM) if the management works on the land where it is used
  11. 11. SPI sub-objective 1.1 • Soil organic carbon gives life to soil • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is pivotal to multifunctional benefits from sustainable land management (SLM) the right thing at the right place è Can be achieved through (SLM) if the management works on the land where it is used
  12. 12. SPI sub-objec-ve 1.1 Doing the right thing at the right place requires good information • What SLM practice is feasible and appropriate? • What SLM will maximize increases or avoid loss in SOC? • What SLM will maximize multiple benefits?
  13. 13. SPI sub-objective 1.1 Doing the right thing at the right place requires good information • What SLM practice is feasible and appropriate? • What SLM will maximize increases or avoid loss in SOC? • What SLM will maximize multiple benefits? The technical report addressed • Where SOC is a priority indicator for LDN • and the above quesCons
  14. 14. Assessment approach – Pathway External reviewers: Herintsitohaina Razakamanarivo, Nopmanee Suvannang, Hamid Čustović, Fernando Garcia Préchac, Joris de Vente, David Lobb, MarEal Bernoux Internal reviewers: Barron Joseph Orr, Mariam Akhtar-Schuster, Omer Muhammad Raja, Johns Muleso Kharika, Jonathan Davies, Corinna Voigt, Erkan Guler, Eduardo Mansur, Thomas Hamond, Maarten Kappelle Contribu<ng authors: AnneQe Cowie, Eleanor Campbell, Paul Vlek, RaQan Lal, Marijana Kapović-Solomun, Graham Paul von MalEtz, German Kust, Nichole Barger, Ronald Vargas, Stefanie Gastrow Lead authors: Jean-Luc Chotte and Ermias Aynekulu
  15. 15. • Background paper by expert consultants – Survey of literature for SLM impacts on SOC – Survey of literature to target investments in SOC management and monitoring – Resource cards on seven global-scale SOC assessment tools • assessment of current capacity for LDN assessments • Interview with 9 software specialists • Technical report developed using a background paper • The technical report underwent an international, independent review, which included domain-knowledge experts from each region, selected by the co-chairs of the SPI • A summary of the technical report was provided by the Chair of the CST and reviewed by the Bureau of the COP Assessment approach
  16. 16. • Managing land to increase or avoid SOC loss requires good informa7on • Technical report aims to provide guidance to assist countries in: Assessment approach Best use of exis+ng informa+on to iden+fy suitable SLM prac+ces and approaches for maintaining or enhancing SOC stocks Iden+fying gaps in informa+on that are necessary and valuable to fill to support management of SOC for LDN Filling gaps in informa+on through SOC measurement and monitoring
  17. 17. Assessment results • SOC is lost faster than it can be added or regained. • SLM can be used to avoid these detrimental ac5ons as well as counter or compensate for their effect. • Change in SOC stocks is far more challenging to manage and monitor on a large scale than the other two indicators of LDN – land cover change and land produc5vity dynamics – – because it is not readily quan5fied by remote sensing. • To establish the rela5onship between SOC and SLM, the net rate of SOC storage for site-specific SLM needs to be determined. – This can be done through the monitoring of effects of SLM on SOC stocks in long-term benchmark sites.
  18. 18. Decision tree 1 (pg 31) provides overall guidance, supported by decision trees 2 - 5 “guidance on where investment in soil organic carbon (SOC) assessment and monitoring are recommended to track the impact of sustainable land management (SLM) implementation and to support monitoring of LDN achievement in terms of SOC change in 2030.” Assessment results – Decision trees
  19. 19. Best use of exis+ng informa+on to iden+fy suitable SLM prac+ces and approaches for maintaining or enhancing SOC stocks Iden+fying gaps in informa+on that are necessary and valuable to fill to support management of SOC for LDN Filling gaps in informa+on through SOC measurement and monitoring Assessment results – Decision trees Together, the decision trees provide guidance on:
  20. 20. Best use of existing information to identify suitable SLM practices and approaches for maintaining or enhancing SOC stocks Identifying gaps in information that are necessary and valuable to fill to support management of SOC for LDN Filling gaps in information through SOC measurement and monitoring Assessment results – Decision trees Together, the decision trees provide guidance on: Decision tree 3 (pg 55-56) Decision tree 1 (pg 31) Decision tree 3 (pg 55-56) Decision tree 4 (pg 67) Decision tree 2 (pg 46) Decision tree 5 (pg 81)
  21. 21. From technical reports to official document CST2 ICCD/COP(14)/CST/2https://knowledge.unccd.int/publication/realising- carbon-benefits-sustainable-land-management- practices-guidelines-estimation https://knowledge.unccd.int/sites/defa ult/files/2019- 08/UNCCD_SPI_2019_PB_1- 1_WEB.pdf SPI sub-objective 1.1
  22. 22. SPI sub-objective 1.1 Based on the science-based assessments, recommendations by Secretariat are proposed for your consideration From technical reports to official document CST2
  23. 23. 1. Encourages Par/es to: • employ SLM technologies and approaches that are designed to maintain or increase SOC with the aim of achieving mul/ple benefits; • use SOC as in indicator to monitor sustainable land management-based land degrada=on neutrality interven=ons to support the achievement of land degrada=on neutrality; • align SOC stock monitoring to na=onal land degrada=on neutrality monitoring; and • share the guidance for land managers at na=onal and subna=onal level SPI sub-objec/ve 1.1
  24. 24. 2. Encourages Parties in collaboration with relevant technical and financial partners to: • strengthen national-level coordination and capacity for soil organic carbon measurement and monitoring by – strengthening capacities of technical institutions and human resources by providing guidance on estimating and monitoring soil organic carbon for land-use planning, land degradation neutrality monitoring and other applications; – developing/reinforcing skills for designing soil sampling strategies and implementing measurement and monitoring programmes; – developing/enhancing processes for quality assurance, sample storage and data retention to support the development of tools/models for soil organic carbon estimation; Policy proposals
  25. 25. 3. Invite technical partners specializing in sustainable land management to: • support investment decisions, • focus interventions on zones at risk and support the selection of locally appropriate sustainable land management technologies and approaches; 4. Invite relevant technical partners in SOC stock assessment to: • develop/refine soil organic carbon estimation tools/models for application in land degradation neutrality assessment on sites where detailed measurements of soil organic carbon are not required; Policy proposals
  26. 26. 5. Urges Parties and other stakeholders to: • integrate gender-responsive actions to promote gender equality and female empowerment through the gender-inclusive design of preliminary land degradation neutrality assessments recommended by the scientific conceptual framework for land degradation neutrality; • develop gender-responsive land degradation neutrality interventions based on women’s participation in decision-making for enabling inclusive land governance; • include gender dimensions in land-use planning and in the design of interventions towards achieving land degradation neutrality Policy proposals
  27. 27. Thank you! Web: www.unccd.int Twi5er: @UNCCD Facebook: www.facebook.com/UNCCD

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