outputs outcomes and impact - IWMI/WRC Research Uptake Workshop

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IWMI/WRC Research Uptake Workshop
amy sullivan
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outputs outcomes and impact - IWMI/WRC Research Uptake Workshop

  1. 1. OUTPUTS, OUTCOMES, & IMPACT Getting to impact from research Amy Sullivan 12.03.2014 Water Research Impact & Uptake Workshop
  2. 2. Outline • Background on local attempts (R4D, ToC) • Some successes and failures • Conclusions • Recommendations
  3. 3. Background • Farming systems, water governance, gender • Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) of the CGIAR
  4. 4. Definitions & Themes • Outputs: typical research or development project milestones. Peer review articles, papers, maps, data bases, models, degrees, trainings, etc. • Outcomes: changes in behaviour resulting from that output. • Impact: sustained change, over time, scaled out and up.
  5. 5. Background CPWF • Phase I: Research for the curious (mainly other researchers) with some exceptions • Some excellent foundation work & relationships • Phase II: Reoriented toward outcomes around a central ‘development challenge’
  6. 6. Local Approach to R4D • CPWF transition from R4R to R4D • Based upon impact pathways, theory of change, outcome logic models • LBDC tried to meet needs, fill gaps, engage next and end users of research
  7. 7. CPWF Limpopo Basin
  8. 8. LIMCOMSADCCOMESAAMCOW
  9. 9. Successes and . . . Not so much • Buy in to the approach . . . varied • Highlighted tangible benefits of partnerships • Broader understanding of complex systems and incentive structures in situ, BUT • Gaps in knowledge, targets & partners • Institutional cultures vis-à-vis incentive structures • Reverting to silos and old habits
  10. 10. Evidence of achievement (Phase I & II) • Outputs have already led to outcomes (changes in behaviour) • New actors around the table—engaged in new conversations • Researchers seeking out engagement to increase relevance of their work • Researchers see value in coordination function
  11. 11. Conclusions • Meeting existing demand is a better bet than selling your goods at the end (comms talking to comms)—but you must understand that demand • Be prepared to defend your choice of targets— because your work will not meet every demand (ToC)
  12. 12. Conclusions • Mandates, legitimacy & convening power are more than buzz words—they are the lay of the land so get to understand them • Time spent on understanding the milieu and pathways to change is invaluable.
  13. 13. Recommendations • Start with what’s working—do not reinvent the wheel (but there are implications) • Engage in a process that generates demand (do your homework in terms of mandates and legitimacy) • No single organization will get you all the way from research to impact (invest in partnerships)
  14. 14. Take Away Messages • Partnerships are the only way to get from outputs to outcomes and impact • Do not let knowledge management become knowledge hoarding • Changing the paradigm takes TIME in a world of high expectations for instant results (elections & donor cycles) • Mandates, legitimacy & convening power are the locks AND the keys to getting to outcomes & impact.
  15. 15. Thank You

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