Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Uncommon Lives of Common Women:  The Missing Half of Wisconsin History By Victoria Brown A project of the Wisconsin  Women...
The Book Itself A collection of biographies, short stories, letters, pictures, quotations, and historical background of Wi...
Who Is…   Ms. Brown?   WWN? <ul><li>Brown has been a member of the Grinnell History Department since the fall of 1989. Bro...
How the Project Began <ul><li>Wisconsin Feminists Projects Fund, Inc. was a non-profit corporation established in 1973 to ...
Necessity of Recording Women’s Lives “I swear to you.  On my common woman’s head.  The common woman is as common as a comm...
The Project Process <ul><li>The search for the women’s stories began with a statewide press release asking citizens to let...
Part I: Wisconsin’s First Women and the Wisconsin Frontier Dear Brother and Sister-in-law, … the vegetables in our garden ...
Electa Quinney <ul><li>She is generally recognized as Wisconsin’s first ‘public school’ teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>Quinney...
Marion Johnson Cooper <ul><li>She taught for about two years until she married John Cooper, the postmaster of Greenfield. ...
Emma Brown <ul><li>Emma Brown was the sole proprietor, editor, and publisher of  The Wisconsin Chief , the unofficial orga...
Part II: The Civil War and Wisconsin Women Dr. Laura Ross of Milwaukee was one of the West’s first women doctors.  She fou...
Ann Bicknell Ellis <ul><li>Ann Bicknell Ellis was born into slavery in the 1850s and  escaped with her mother and brother ...
Coeducation at UW-Madison <ul><li>The Civil War so depleted the male student body that fifteen women in the Normal Departm...
Elizabeth Stone <ul><li>Elizabeth Stone was using penicillin to treat victims of timber accidents in Peshtigo, Wisconsin, ...
Betsy Thunder <ul><li>Betsy Thunder was a member of the Winnebago Sky Clan. She came to be trusted within the Winnebago an...
Helen Bruneau VanVechten <ul><li>Helen VanVechten owned a print shop, along with her husband and a business partner, in Wa...
Part III: The Progressive Years “ The assumption that women, however hard they work in the household and however much of a...
Jane & Ellen Lloyd Jones <ul><li>Jane and Ellen Jones were the founders of Hillside Home School, a combination home, schoo...
Lutie Stearns <ul><li>Lutie Stearns traveled thousands of miles and after 20  years was able to establish 150 free public ...
Julia Grace Wales <ul><li>Julia Wales was 33 years old when WWI began, a Shakespearean scholar, and English instructor at ...
Part IV: The Twenties and Beyond Mary Spellman, a retired math teacher, served two terms as Beaver Dam’s mayor (1934-38), ...
Eulalia Croll <ul><li>When Eulalia Croll was a senior at UW-Madison in 1913, she was the captain of six athletic teams. </...
Hildegard Chada <ul><li>Hildegard was a bride of 24 when the market crashed.  She and her husband moved to Boulder Junctio...
Emma Toft <ul><li>Emma Toft was born in Bailey’s Harbor in Door County in 1891.  Her father taught her about the trees and...
Other Sources for Wisconsin Women’s History  <ul><li>On Wisconsin Women: Working for Their Rights from Settlement to Suffr...
The End <ul><li>If you are not already a supporter of the Wisconsin Women's Network, please check out our website for more...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Uncommon Lives Of Common Women Power Point

2,997 views

Published on

A presentation based on the book, "Uncommon Lives of Common Women: the Missing Half of Wisconsin History," by Victoria Brown. For more information, visit www.wiwomensnetwork.org.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Uncommon Lives Of Common Women Power Point

  1. 1. Uncommon Lives of Common Women: The Missing Half of Wisconsin History By Victoria Brown A project of the Wisconsin Women’s Network
  2. 2. The Book Itself A collection of biographies, short stories, letters, pictures, quotations, and historical background of Wisconsin women from 1700s-1950s We must look for women’s strengths and energy within the context of their times valuing their accomplishments given the prejudices and requirements of each era. Message = WOMEN DOING Being active, busy, and productive
  3. 3. Who Is… Ms. Brown? WWN? <ul><li>Brown has been a member of the Grinnell History Department since the fall of 1989. Brown received her B.A. in American Institutions from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Ph.D. in History from the University of California at San Diego. </li></ul><ul><li>The Wisconsin Women's Network is a coalition of women's organizations, labor unions, religious and educational groups, providers of human services, and business associations. </li></ul><ul><li>These organizations and individual members, advance the status of women and girls in Wisconsin through communication, education and advocacy. </li></ul>
  4. 4. How the Project Began <ul><li>Wisconsin Feminists Projects Fund, Inc. was a non-profit corporation established in 1973 to develop programs benefiting Wisconsin women in their education, employment, social advancement. Brown was a stockholder and knew the Board members. </li></ul><ul><li>Brown was approached by Wisconsin Feminists Project Fund, Inc. with the idea of a research project on women in Wisconsin history to recognize and celebrate the coming Bicentennial and International Woman’s Year. The project grew out of their desire to know more about women’s history. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Necessity of Recording Women’s Lives “I swear to you. On my common woman’s head. The common woman is as common as a common loaf of bread…And will rise.” <ul><li>These women in particular often do not have well-documented personal histories. These groups have greatly suffered from scholars’ disinterest in their history. </li></ul><ul><li>Women have been “lost” due to male-oriented history never thinking it important to study them. </li></ul><ul><li>Due to all the barriers to finding “lost women,” this book does not include as many women of color, industrial women, and urban working class women as we would have liked. </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Project Process <ul><li>The search for the women’s stories began with a statewide press release asking citizens to let Brown know about Wisconsin women. </li></ul><ul><li>The other seventeen women’s stories were found by searching the State Historical Society and other local historical societies and research centers around the state. </li></ul><ul><li>Brown was looking for stories that represented a broad span of Wisconsin’s historical eras, geography, ethnic mix, and social and economic life. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Part I: Wisconsin’s First Women and the Wisconsin Frontier Dear Brother and Sister-in-law, … the vegetables in our garden are growing nicely…They give me great pleasure…If I only had a few good true women friends I would be entirely satisfied… Your faithful sister, Katherine “ They were shut up with the children in log cabins…they took upon themselves for weeks and months and even years, the burden of their households in a continued struggle with hindrances and perplexities.” Mrs. Ocshner Manz came to Buffalo County from Switzerland in 1851. She was so effective at curing sick people that when a doctor tried to sue her for practicing without a license, he was run out of town. Dear Family, … I must speak of the necessity for women missionaries to this country to be of good and firm health. None should come but of strong and rugged constitution if they wish to be of use. Florantho Sproat – LaPointe, WI
  8. 8. Electa Quinney <ul><li>She is generally recognized as Wisconsin’s first ‘public school’ teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>Quinney was a Stockbridge-Munsee indigenous woman. She had come with her tribe to the Fox River Valley from New York in the massive Indian removal of 1827. </li></ul><ul><li>The school she opened in Kaukauna in 1828 was the first in the state where students did not have to pay to be enrolled. </li></ul><ul><li>Many of her pupils were Native Americans and poor whites who had never before been able to afford the luxury of schooling. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Marion Johnson Cooper <ul><li>She taught for about two years until she married John Cooper, the postmaster of Greenfield. In their home stayed the married couple, seven of their children, and John’s parents. </li></ul><ul><li>Marion ran the post office while her husband ran the farm. Their home became the center of activity. </li></ul><ul><li>John was the Territorial Justice, their parlor was the scene of countless weddings, will-readings, and minor squabbles. </li></ul><ul><li>She was able to maintain this busy atmosphere for 25 years. Marion died in 1869 at which time John gave up his job as postmaster because he could not handle the work alone. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Emma Brown <ul><li>Emma Brown was the sole proprietor, editor, and publisher of The Wisconsin Chief , the unofficial organ of the Wisconsin Good Templars, for the next 24 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes weekly, sometimes monthly four page sheet, the newspaper’s motto was “Right On!” It was devoted to upholding the ideal of temperance and exposing the evils of drink. </li></ul><ul><li>Emma’s reform pieces included articles on prison and factory conditions and women’s rights. </li></ul><ul><li>When Emma learned she had cancer in 1889, she dissolved the newspaper, which was by then the oldest temperance newspaper in the country. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Part II: The Civil War and Wisconsin Women Dr. Laura Ross of Milwaukee was one of the West’s first women doctors. She fought for women’s rights in the medical establishment. She continued to apply for membership to the Milwaukee County Medical Society for six years until the all-male Society admitted her. Ella Hobart functioned as a regular army chaplain; however, she received no pay. After the war, she fought hard for compensation and disability pay for the malaria she contracted while in service, but she was never recognized or compensated for her service. News of the Great Peshtigo Fire reached Madison when the governor was in Chicago aiding victims of that great fire. His wife, Frances Bull Fairchild, acted as governor for two days as she issued a public appeal for money, clothing, bedding, food, and supplies such that two boxcars headed for Marinette County were able to leave Madison that day. <ul><li>“ In the pioneer days of northern Wisconsin, women’s organizations were not wholly approved of. It took vision and fortitude, courage and determination for a little band of women to carry out their plan for starting a woman’s club in the then-young town of Antigo. But they succeeded in their efforts…” </li></ul><ul><li>Eulogy to Ida Wright Albers, </li></ul><ul><li>founding member of Antigo’s Woman’s Club </li></ul>
  12. 12. Ann Bicknell Ellis <ul><li>Ann Bicknell Ellis was born into slavery in the 1850s and escaped with her mother and brother to Illinois during the war. Ann was brought to Fort Atkinson by Dr. Simon Bicknell, an army surgeon. </li></ul><ul><li>There she earned a living as a candy-maker and married a black man named Jim Ellis in 1875, who worked as a postman and a carpenter. He was also brought by Dr. Bicknell, and he and Ann were the only two black people in the town. </li></ul><ul><li>Ann was able to work at home and take care of her two sons because she got frequent customers due to the high school across the street. All that remains of Ann’s personal effects is an un-mailed postcard from 1913, two years after Jim’s death and one year before her own. It simply says, “It’s so lonely here.” </li></ul>
  13. 13. Coeducation at UW-Madison <ul><li>The Civil War so depleted the male student body that fifteen women in the Normal Department were allowed to take “regular” courses – just to keep up enrollment. </li></ul><ul><li>All looked well when in 1866 the announcement was made that “the University and all its departments and colleges shall be open alike to male and female students.” </li></ul><ul><li>President Chadbourne in 1867 demanded coeducation be modified. The Normal Department was replaced by the “Female College.” </li></ul><ul><li>This obviously inefficient and expensive system of segregation was abolished by his successors. </li></ul>In 1901, Ladies’ Hall was renamed Chadbourne Hall in honor of the man who had been instrumental in its construction yet would have been displeased with its ultimate use.
  14. 14. Elizabeth Stone <ul><li>Elizabeth Stone was using penicillin to treat victims of timber accidents in Peshtigo, Wisconsin, 70 years before Dr. Alexander Fleming “discovered” it. </li></ul><ul><li>She was a farm wife but had begun practical nursing during the Civil War and continued to assist the sick and injured wherever and whenever she was called. </li></ul><ul><li>Though she had no formal training in medicine, she took up nursing because “she had a gentle touch and found that it was needed.” </li></ul>
  15. 15. Betsy Thunder <ul><li>Betsy Thunder was a member of the Winnebago Sky Clan. She came to be trusted within the Winnebago and white communities as a skillful medical practitioner. </li></ul><ul><li>She put great importance on properly conducting ceremonies for collecting, preparing, and administering the medicines. </li></ul><ul><li>Betsy received gifts for her services because medicine was thought to be useless if the patient was not willing to offer something for it. </li></ul><ul><li>When the U.S. government ordered Wisconsin Winnebagoes to migrate to Nebraska, Betsy and others hid out in the hills of Jackson County. She lived in Wisconsin her entire life because she felt god had wanted it that way. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Helen Bruneau VanVechten <ul><li>Helen VanVechten owned a print shop, along with her husband and a business partner, in Wausau, Wisconsin. The Philosopher Press was founded in 1896. </li></ul><ul><li>She signed all books she printed indicating that she had printed every page, putting the sheets through the press, attending to the ink distribution and insuring that every letter was flawless. </li></ul><ul><li>She was known and respected by rare book collectors all over the world. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Part III: The Progressive Years “ The assumption that women, however hard they work in the household and however much of actual money value that work has, do not support themselves but are supported by their husbands, that they earn nothing and own nothing – that assumption, upon which all our property laws are based, is so abominable that I cannot find words to express my opinion of it.” “… woman deprives man not merely of his former opportunities for employment, but of herself…The college girl is visibly preparing herself to compete with the college boy and to live without him…woman is hated solely because more and more man is prevented from loving her.” Wisconsin was the first State in the Union where the Equal Rights Amendment passed (within one year of achieving suffrage). However by 1940, legal interpretation had rendered the law meaningless as a tool for establishing equality between men and women. The Political Equality League, 1912
  18. 18. Jane & Ellen Lloyd Jones <ul><li>Jane and Ellen Jones were the founders of Hillside Home School, a combination home, school, and farm that opened in 1887 outside of Spring Green. At times, it had as many as 100 residents. </li></ul><ul><li>Botany and biology were seldom taught indoors. </li></ul><ul><li>A frequent visitor was “Cousin Frank,” Frank Lloyd Wright, the young architect from Chicago who was the son of their older sister. </li></ul><ul><li>The school went into serious debt when they loaned their brother a large sum of money, and he died before repaying it. The sisters closed the school and moved to Los Angeles. </li></ul><ul><li>After their deaths, the school was inherited and used by Wright as a living and learning environment for young architects, one true to the tradition established by the sisters. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Lutie Stearns <ul><li>Lutie Stearns traveled thousands of miles and after 20 years was able to establish 150 free public libraries and 1400 traveling libraries enabling tens of thousands of Wisconsin residents access to books. </li></ul><ul><li>She visited towns, gave lectures, conducted surveys, recommended better library procedures, assisted communities in obtaining Carnegie grants, advised in book selection, trained librarians, and dealt with local town councils. </li></ul><ul><li>Between 1914 and her death in 1943, she was a free-lance lecturer and a columnist for the Milwaukee Sentinel. She campaigned for woman suffrage, world peace, temperance, better working conditions for women, educational reform, and other Progressive issues. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Julia Grace Wales <ul><li>Julia Wales was 33 years old when WWI began, a Shakespearean scholar, and English instructor at UW-Madison and a dedicated Christian. </li></ul><ul><li>From August until December of 1914, she was driven by her outrage of the war. At the end of this time she wrote the first draft of a peace plan entitled “Continuous Mediation Without Armistice.” </li></ul><ul><li>The idea, the way she presented it, and whom she presented it to, made her booklet an instant success and catapulted its author to ‘stardom’ in the peace movement. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Part IV: The Twenties and Beyond Mary Spellman, a retired math teacher, served two terms as Beaver Dam’s mayor (1934-38), during which time she was the only woman mayor in Wisconsin and one of few in the country. Mary Jean Marlotte was a log roller from age 5. She won the world championship and later went to theological school in Indiana. Even as a minister, in July 1947, she retained her title of World Champion Log Birler at a meet in Gladstone, Michigan.
  22. 22. Eulalia Croll <ul><li>When Eulalia Croll was a senior at UW-Madison in 1913, she was the captain of six athletic teams. </li></ul><ul><li>She remembers playing baseball on the flattened tier on Bascom Hill and hearing crowds of cheering fans at the women’s basketball games in Lathrop Hall. </li></ul><ul><li>In Milwaukee, she volunteered to score for the city recreational department for ten years. She organized a basketball and baseball team among women employees at the Boston Store. </li></ul><ul><li>“ I owe my good health to my athletics. I’ve enjoyed everything in athletics, but I liked it best when I could play.” </li></ul>
  23. 23. Hildegard Chada <ul><li>Hildegard was a bride of 24 when the market crashed. She and her husband moved to Boulder Junction in Vilas County where survival was the main occupation. </li></ul><ul><li>During WWII, she applied for a job superintending the local fire tower since, by 1944, the war had called up all the area’s qualified men. </li></ul><ul><li>Everyday for two years, she walked the two miles from her cabin to the tower, climbed the 85-foot ladder with her daily supplies slung over her shoulder in an onion sack, and settled down to watch for signs of smoke. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Emma Toft <ul><li>Emma Toft was born in Bailey’s Harbor in Door County in 1891. Her father taught her about the trees and wildlife, and her mother taught her about flowers. After spending a few years teaching in the Midwest and entering nurses’ training, she returned home to care for her parents. </li></ul><ul><li>She started a family hotel, where every summer for almost 40 years, those who loved nature as much as she, returned to Toft’s Point. Countless visitors were guided through her forest – families of campers, groups of college students, conservation clubs, and thousands of Door County school children. </li></ul><ul><li>She provided leadership essential to start the Ridges Sanctuary and make it a success. Since 1937, the Ridges has acquired over 700 additional acres of property through purchase and donation, making it the largest corporately-owned flower preserve in the nation. </li></ul><ul><li>She has received countless awards for her service to the community and her contribution to conservation, including the Congressional Medal of Honor in 1964. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Other Sources for Wisconsin Women’s History <ul><li>On Wisconsin Women: Working for Their Rights from Settlement to Suffrage Genevieve McBride </li></ul><ul><li>Women's Wisconsin: From Native Matriarchies to the New Millennium Edited by Genevieve G. McBride </li></ul><ul><li>Transforming Women's Education: The History of Women's Studies in the University of Wisconsin System A Collaborative Project of the University of Wisconsin System Women's Studies Consortium </li></ul><ul><li>A Mind of her Own: Helen Connor Laird and Family, 1888–1982 Helen L. Laird </li></ul><ul><li>Useful Work for Unskilled Women: A Unique Milwaukee WPA Project Mary Kellogg Rice </li></ul><ul><li>Strong-Minded Woman: The Story of Lavinia Goodell, Wisconsin's First Female Lawyer Mary Lahr Schier </li></ul><ul><li>Nell's Story: A Woman from Eagle River Nell Peters, with Robert Peters </li></ul><ul><li>Women Remember the War: 1941-1945 Edited by Michael E. Stevens </li></ul>
  26. 26. The End <ul><li>If you are not already a supporter of the Wisconsin Women's Network, please check out our website for more information: www.wiwomensnetwork.org </li></ul>

×