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Some thoughts on OER reuse from Derby to Kabul: Presentation for Open Nottingham, 7 April 2011 <br />Gabi Witthaus, Beyond...
OER Workshops in Kabul<br />Two one-day workshops<br />Participants: 25 academics, 6 students, 3 researchers<br />Institut...
Context<br />http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/12/AR2011021203545.html<br />
Current situation<br />Current course development process involves “compiling” materials from available sources<br />Quote...
Challenges while searching<br />Slow download times<br />Format of many OERs incompatible with local laptops<br />Confusin...
Key findings<br />All participants said they would:<br />Spend more time searching for OERs<br />Change their approach to ...
Comments from academics<br />“I was amazed to see this invaluable treasure that we can access so easily.”<br />“Now we can...
Comments from students<br />“When our teacher is planning to teach us about a particular topic in a lecture, I will search...
Lessons for OER producers <br />There is an enthusiastic audience for OERs outside of the UK.<br />Try to see the OERs and...
The Case for the Use of OERs in Legal Pedagogy<br />Jamie Grace, 2011<br />University of Derby<br />
Great ‘legal’ OERs<br />The OU resources<br />Case reports and more: www.bailii.org<br />Law school journals e.g. Script-E...
Law teachers as a case study<br />I wanted to make a couple of points:<br />‘The law’ is freely available (it is a human r...
Legal information and the web<br />‘The law’ is freely available (it is a human right, of sorts)<br />Internet and broadba...
Access to information<br />Freedom of Information Act 2000<br />The UCLAN case<br />Accessibility of resources determined ...
Thanks<br />Please get in touch if we can work together: <br />Jamie Grace: j.grace@derby.ac.uk<br />Gabi Witthaus: gabi.w...
Acknowledgements<br />Banner derived from Flickr image ‘ostriches closeup’ by matstornberg licensed under a Creative Commo...
Follow the Sun: Online Learning Futures Festival<br />13–15 April 2011<br />Three countries, three time zones: this non-st...
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  1. 1. Some thoughts on OER reuse from Derby to Kabul: Presentation for Open Nottingham, 7 April 2011 <br />Gabi Witthaus, Beyond Distance Research Alliance at University of Leicester<br />Jamie Grace, School of Law and Criminology, University of Derby<br />
  2. 2. OER Workshops in Kabul<br />Two one-day workshops<br />Participants: 25 academics, 6 students, 3 researchers<br />Institutions: universities in and around Kabul and a policy research NGO <br />Disciplines: wide range including Geology, Fine Arts, Law<br />Partners: DfID, British Council, OU UK, Leicester University<br />Purpose: to explore reuse and creation of OERs in curriculum design<br />
  3. 3. Context<br />http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/12/AR2011021203545.html<br />
  4. 4. Current situation<br />Current course development process involves “compiling” materials from available sources<br />Quote from participant: “Copyright problem? What copyright problem?!” [;-)]<br />Subscriptions to international journals unaffordable<br />No institutional intranets or VLEs<br />Rote learning is the dominant style<br />
  5. 5. Challenges while searching<br />Slow download times<br />Format of many OERs incompatible with local laptops<br />Confusing layout and navigation of repositories – search & retrieval process follows no clear standards<br />Use of unfamiliar terms, e.g. ‘HE’ and ‘FE’<br />Search can be extremely time-consuming, often to find the perfect OER but it’s just a “taster”<br />OERs separated from licences when downloaded.<br />
  6. 6. Key findings<br />All participants said they would:<br />Spend more time searching for OERs<br />Change their approach to teaching/ learning as a result of the workshop. <br />Most participants said they would:<br />Translate or modify OERs for their students<br />Consider creating OERs themselves<br />
  7. 7. Comments from academics<br />“I was amazed to see this invaluable treasure that we can access so easily.”<br />“Now we can solve some of our problems with these [OER] sites … Also I want to say that this is one of the most important parts of education that everyone should know about.”<br />“Now we know different sources of reliable, up-to-date information. We will try to use this and make it relevant to Afghanistan.”<br />
  8. 8. Comments from students<br />“When our teacher is planning to teach us about a particular topic in a lecture, I will search before the session for OERs… so that I am well prepared.”<br />“This is better than a Google search (for learning materials). It’s more relevant.”<br />“I’m going to use OERs in my free time.”<br />
  9. 9. Lessons for OER producers <br />There is an enthusiastic audience for OERs outside of the UK.<br />Try to see the OERs and repositories through the lens of users. Use plain English. Avoid acronyms.<br />Formatting – provide many formats, esp. for print materials. Remember: MS Word is not universal; PDF is not modifiable!<br />Embed the licence in the OER – OERs can get separated from their cover pages on repositories.<br />Repositories: use familiar navigation styles.<br />
  10. 10. The Case for the Use of OERs in Legal Pedagogy<br />Jamie Grace, 2011<br />University of Derby<br />
  11. 11. Great ‘legal’ OERs<br />The OU resources<br />Case reports and more: www.bailii.org<br />Law school journals e.g. Script-Ed<br />A growing trend for OERs?<br />Module tasters and one-off events<br />Whole modules<br />‘True’ OERs – breaking free of module design? Introductory and universal<br />
  12. 12. Law teachers as a case study<br />I wanted to make a couple of points:<br />‘The law’ is freely available (it is a human right, of sorts)<br />Individuals have the legal right to access our teaching materials – so take up the process fully<br />
  13. 13. Legal information and the web<br />‘The law’ is freely available (it is a human right, of sorts)<br />Internet and broadband access<br />Legal scholarship and publishing<br />Case law and law reports<br />The OER agenda<br />
  14. 14. Access to information<br />Freedom of Information Act 2000<br />The UCLAN case<br />Accessibility of resources determined by ‘prejudice to commercial interests’<br />Publication of more information in a more competitive HE environment, not less<br />We’re talking about ideology…<br />
  15. 15. Thanks<br />Please get in touch if we can work together: <br />Jamie Grace: j.grace@derby.ac.uk<br />Gabi Witthaus: gabi.witthaus@le.ac.uk<br />Acknowledgement: Banner derived from Flickr image ‘ostriches closeup’ by matstornberglicensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 2.0 generic license.<br />
  16. 16. Acknowledgements<br />Banner derived from Flickr image ‘ostriches closeup’ by matstornberg licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 2.0 generic license.<br />
  17. 17. Follow the Sun: Online Learning Futures Festival<br />13–15 April 2011<br />Three countries, three time zones: this non-stop, global, online conference will begin in Leicester(UK) on Wed 13 April, continue in Seattle (USA), and conclude in Toowoomba (Australia) 48 hours later.<br />17<br />www.tinyurl.com/followthesun<br />

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