The railway children

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The Railway Children is a text used in the English Literature Component for Form 3 --- please take note that this is a DRAFT version -- please respect the work and effort of the teachers who prepared this teaching notes.

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The railway children

  1. 1. N O V E L Form 3 The Railway ChildrenCurriculum Development Division. Ministry of Education Malaysia 2011
  2. 2. Table of ContentContent PagePreface 1Acknowledgement 4Introduction 5Synopsis 11Elements 12Activities 28Assessment 84Answer Key 101Glossary 117
  3. 3. PrefaceThe Teacher‟s Literature Component Teaching ModuleThis Literature Component Teaching Module is for teachers who are teaching the LiteratureComponent of Language Curriculum for Malaysian Secondary Schools. This second cyclein the implementation of the Literature Component began in January 2010 for Forms 1 and4. The Literature Component for Form 3 is made up of a selection of creative and literaryworks in two main genres, Poems and Novels. The module provides an overview of thetexts to be taught and suggested activities for the different genres found in the literaturecomponent of the English Language Curriculum for secondary schools. This module provides teachers with practical ideas and suggestions for making theteaching of the literature component an interesting and exciting experience both for teachersas well as students. Through fun-filled learning activities, students should be able toappreciate, demonstrate understanding and express personal responses to literary andcreative works. Teachers are encouraged to adapt and modify the activities and materials inthis module to suit their students‟ learning styles and level of proficiency. This is to ensurethat the element of fun and experimentation with the language is not hampered.Structure of the ModuleThe Literature Component Teaching Module for Form 3 is divided into eight sections:Section 1 - Introduction: Provides a general overview of the novel and its elements: - Plot - Subplot - Setting - Characterisation - Theme - Symbols - Irony - Style - Language The author‟s background and reteller‟s background are given as additional information. 1
  4. 4. Section 2 – Synopsis : This section provides a brief summary of the of the plot.Section 3 - Elements : In this section, teachers and students will be introduced to: - Plot summary of each chapter (17 chapters). - Characters of the novel (main and minor characters), characteristics of each character and the textual evidence. - Themes or central ideas of the novel (main and minor themes). - Values from the novel. - Literary devicesSection 4 – Activities : This section provides some suggested learning activities and each activity may be accompanied by activity sheets, handouts and suggested adaptations. Each activity consists of five parts: - Time - Aim(s) of activity - Material(s) for the activity - Steps on how to conduct the activity - Additional notes are included for further clarification, explanation and instruction. Section 5 –Assessment : Test students‟ performance using summative and formative types of questions.Section 6 -Suggested answers - The answer keys are provided for the activities in Section 4 and Section 5. The suggested answers are a guide only and other appropriate responses are acceptable.Section 7 – Glossary : A glossary list is provided at the end of each genre section. This list contains some of the words/phrases and their meanings as used in the texts.Section 8 – Appendix. 2
  5. 5. Note to TeachersThis Literature Component Teaching Module for Form 3 provides suggested activities for theteaching of the texts in the Form Three Literature Component. However, for purposes ofreinforcement and extension, teachers are encouraged to adapt, modify and adjust theactivities to suit the students‟ proficiency level. Teachers should bear in mind that in theteaching and learning of the literature component, it is pertinent to explore students‟creativity and potential. Thus, there is a need to provide opportunities for the students toparticipate actively and express themselves without much reservation. The Literature Component Teaching Module in the English Language Curriculum forMalaysian Secondary Schools primarily focuses on the „fun‟ aspect of learning. Thus, mucheffort should be put into sustaining interest in reading literature for fun and not learning forexamination purposes. Rather, there should be some kind of formative assessments carriedout during the teaching and learning process to help students progress to their next level ofcompetence. Furthermore, formative assessment could improve instruction andeffectiveness in teaching of the Literature Component in the English Language curriculum. It is hoped that teachers will find the module handy, resourceful, helpful andbeneficial to effectively and efficiently implement the new Malaysian English LanguageCurriculum for Secondary School. So this will successfully produce and create effectiveEnglish Language Lessons that will stimulate students into becoming more proficient andadept English Language users. 3
  6. 6. AcknowledgementThese teaching modules were developed and compiled with the help of a group ofdedicated teachers from various schools all over the country. To them, the Ministryof Education would like to express its sincere gratitude and thanks. Members of theteam, working in collaboration with the Curriculum Development Division are: 1. Pn Vasantha Mallar Narendran SMK Victoria, Kuala Lumpur 2. Pn Yong Wai Yee SK Brickfields 1, Kuala Lumpur 3. Pn Suhaila Ahmad Akhirudin SMK Taman Sri Muda, Shah Alam, Selangor 4. En Khairul Anuar bin Yang Ahmad SMK King Edward VII, Taiping, Perak 5. Pn Sathiavany a/p Madhavan SMK St Paul, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan 6. En Jimmy Then Choon Jing SMK Bintulu, Sarawak 7. En Norrol Sham bin Mohd Yunus SMK Sg. Pasir, Sg. Petani, Kedah 8. En. Xavier Manickam SMK Rantau, Negeri Sembilan 9. En Au Yeong Weng Hang SMK Seri Permaisuri, Kuala Lumpur 10. Pn Nooraini binti Baba SMK Wakaf Tapai, Terengganu 11. Pn Ezareen bt C. Ahmad Ezanee SMK Bukit Jelutong, Shah Alam, Selangor 12. Pn Ingrid Sarina Rueh SMK Bukit Indah, Ampang, Selangor 13. Pn Vasanthi Sandragasam SMK Tun Habab, Kota Tinggi, Johor 14. Pn Hyacinth Foo Mook Keow SMK Seri Sentosa, Kuala Lumpur 15. Pn Norfidzah bt Mohd Nordin SMK Taman Melawati, Gombak, Selangor 16. Pn Khoo Guat Tin SMK Subang Jaya SS14/6, Selangor 17. En. Mohd Zamri bin Abu Zarin SBPI Rawang, Selangor 18. En. Adrian Robert SM La Salle, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah 19. Pn Sabina Kok SMK Assunta, Selangor 20. Pn Marina bt Mahmood SMAP Labu, Labu, Negeri Sembilan 21. Pn. Intan Hamimah bt Mamat SMK Seksyen 18, Shah Alam, Selangor 22. Pn Michelle Lim Pek Sim SMK Bandar Puchong Jaya (B), Selangor 23. Pn Elyani bt Khalid SMK Agama Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur 24. Cik Darshini Nadarajan SMK Alor Akar, Kuantan, Pahang 25. En. Mohd Redza Asyraf bin Ramlee SMK Jitra, Kedah 26. Pn Juliana Ali SBPI Jempol, Negeri Sembilan 27. Pn Diana Fatimah Ahmad Sahani Bahagian Pembangunan Kurikulum, KPM 28. Cik Masreen Wirda Mohammad Ali Bahagian Pembangunan Kurikulum, KPM 29. YM Tengku Ireneza Marina Tengku Mazlan Bahagian Pembangunan Kurikulum, KPM 30. En Ng Yew Kee Bahagian Pembangunan Kurikulum, KPM 4
  7. 7. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN NOVEL IntroductionA novel is a fictional piece of prose usually written in a narrative style. Novels tell stories,which are typically defined as a series of events described in a sequence.There have been stories and tales for thousands of years, but novels must combine a fewunique characteristics in order to be defined as such. First, a novel is written down, ratherthan told through an oral account. Secondly, novels are meant to be fictional in form,differentiating them from myths, which are said to have their basis in reality or theology.Although some modern scholars argue differently, there is no truly established guideline forlength, point-of-view, or even establishment of a moral or philosophical point in novels.Throughout the centuries, the novel stumbled along with great waxing and waning inpopularity. Many modern examples held up as great novels were written throughout the 19thand 20th centuries, when novels finally gained a permanent position as an acceptable formof literature. Since that time, novels have become the most common form of publishedliterature, far outpacing the published plays, poetry, and works of non-fiction that once heldsway over the literate world.Novels are often beloved for their creation of spectacular worlds, compassionate characters,and carefully thought-out arguments. They are often seen as a boundless realm ofexploration and creativity, with sub-genres springing up to include nearly every type ofsubject that can be written about. A novel requires only imagination and talent to createmassive worlds and detailed characters.There are certain elements which every novel has and these are: plot setting characterisation theme style and presentation 5
  8. 8. PlotThis is what happens in the novel; it is the authors arrangement of the story.Key points to note:- There can be a logical development of events with a careful linking of scenes.- There can be a series of apparently unrelated scenes which are not shown to be connected until the end of the novel - there should be a beginning, a middle and an end.- The plot should be plausible, but there can still be room for the element of surprise.- There should be conflict, either within the central characters or between characters, or between characters and their environment.- The climax of the story is the highest point of interest, the moment when the conflict is most intense, the time when the consequences of a characters actions become inevitable and when all the main points of the plot merge.- The denouement is when all the little mysteries in the plot are revealed and all the loose ends are tidied up.- The pace of the novel slows with the denouement.Sub-plotThis is a sequence (or sequences) of events that parallels the main plot; it can closelyresemble the main plot or it can diverge in significant ways in order to highlight the main plot.SettingThe setting of a novel encompasses a number of different, but linked elements:- time - day or night, summer or winter, the historical period (an actual date)- place - inside or outside, country or city, specific town and country, real or fictional- social - the minor characters who take little part in advancing the plot, but whose presence contributes to the realism of the novel- mood and atmosphere - eerie, dangerous, menacing, tense, threatening, relaxing, nostalgic, happy, light-hearted etc. 6
  9. 9. CharacterisationCharacters in a novel are the vehicles by which the author conveys to us his or her view ofthe world.Key points to note:- We learn about individual characters from their own words and actions, from what other characters say about them and the way others act towards them.- Characters help to advance the plot.- Believable characters must grow and change in response to their experiences in the novel.ThemeThis is the central idea which runs through the novel, the author‟s purpose in writing.Key points:- It is the point of view from which the author is writing and there may be a moral value to the story.- The theme gives the story focus, unity, impact and a point.- The theme becomes clear by looking at what happens to the major characters and their involvement with other elements of the story.SymbolsThese are often used to help clarify a theme and can be anything from a single object (a key, anecklace, a stone), a place (the beach, an airport, a house), a repeated type of object (a dark car, awoman in sunglasses, an eagle flying overhead), a shape (diamonds, circles, crucifixes), a gesture(wiping glasses, lighting a pipe, a hand in a pocket), a colour, a sound, a piece of music, poetry; to afragrance (the smell of new-mown grass, cigar smoke).- Symbols are used to give intangible ideas and emotions a visibility and solidity that makes the reader notice them.- Symbols can help to give unity to the plot - a recurring symbol is used to link different events and characters.IronyThis is the revelation of the unexpected consequences of actions and words.- Irony can add interest, humour and impact to the novel.- It can give depth to characters, tighten the plot, help to define the characters and contribute to our understanding of the authors theme. 7
  10. 10. StyleThis is the way the story is written.There are four main ways a story can be presented and countless combinations of these:- The central character tells the story in his or her own words.- A non-central character tells the story.- The author refers to all characters in the third person, but reveals only what can be seen, heard or thought by a central character.- The author refers to each character in the third person and describes what most or all of the characters see, hear and think; the author can also describe events which do not concern any of the characters.The author can adopt:- a subjective point of view, which means he or she judges and interprets the characters for the reader- an objective view, in which the author presents events and allows the reader to make judgements- an author can use flashbacks to fill in backgroundLanguageThe language used by the author also reveals the theme and purpose of the novel:- The complexity of sentence and paragraph structure, the use of humour, satire and irony, imagery and other poetic devices and word choice all contribute to our appreciation of the characters and events which involve them.- The reader can be left totally unconcerned about the fate of the characters or be moved by some tragic end to the story. 8
  11. 11. AUTHOR‟S BACKGROUNDEdith Nesbit was born on 15 August 1858 in London, England. She was an English authorand poet who wrote the childrens novel The Railway Children in 1906. Her early years werespent with her two brothers and sisters at the family‟s agricultural college that hergrandfather founded. After the sudden death of her father, and one of her sisters ill health,they lived in various parts of the country before young Edith was sent to boarding school.Later, the family moved to France and Germany, where Edith attended school.In 1871 the Nesbits settled at Halstead Hall in Kent, England. The next few years were asource of many happy memories and influences on Nesbits future writing. Adventures inand around the local pond, and in the surrounding gardens, investigating secretpassageways in their home, and walking down the railway tracks that crossed the back fieldswith her brothers were events she would develop in her popular stories for children. She wasalready flexing her vivid imagination in the poems she started to write around the age offourteen.On 22 April 1880 Edith married Hubert Bland. Her husband was one of the founders of theFabian Society, a British socialist movement, whose purpose is to advance the principles ofdemocratic socialism. At this time Nesbit became an active socialist, cut her hair short andembraced the new values of the "advanced" woman. She and her husband jointly edited theSocietys journal, Today, and entertained many friends and colleagues at their grand homeWell Hall, Kent. After Hubert died in 1914, Edith married Thomas Tucker. 9
  12. 12. Nesbit then lived a colourful and active life while writing many poems, plays, short stories,fiction and non-fiction, but some of her most enduring works are her childrens stories. Withelements of fantasy, time travel and spies, fairy tales and magic, they are a reflection of heridyllic childhood days and travels through England, France, and Germany. Some of Nesbitsadditional works include, The Prophets Mantle (1885), Something Wrong (1886), The Storyof the Treasure Seekers (1899),The Wouldbegoods (1901),The Red House (1902), FiveChildren and It (1902),The Phoenix and the Carpet (1904),The New Treasurer-Seekers(1904),The Amulet (1906), The Enchanted Castle (1907), and The Magic World (1912).Nesbit‟s notable work, The Railway Children (1906) has inspired television and filmadaptations. John Escott, a published adapter, is among some authors who had retold thestory under the Oxford Bookworms series.Edith Nesbit died on 4 May 1924 and lies buried in the churchyard of St Marys in the Marsh,Kent, England.Source: From the Biography written by C.D. Merriman for Jalic Inc. Copyright JalicInc 2006,http://www.online-literature.com/edith-nesbit/ Date accessed: 4 April 2011.RETELLER‟S BACKGROUNDJohn Escott was born in Somerset, England. He started writing children‟s books and comicscripts, but now he writes for students of all ages. He is also a published adapter, author,editor, and a narrator of childrens books. Escott enjoys writing crime and mystery thrillers.He has published many titles for the Oxford Bookworms series including Agatha Christie,The Fly and Girl on a Motorbike. Other published credits of John Escott include theDominoes Series such as A Pretty Face Cassette, The Wild West and White Fang. When heis not writing, he enjoys walking along empty beaches, watching videos and searching oldbooks. John Escott is married with two grown-up children and three grandchildren. 10
  13. 13. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN NOVEL Synopsis Roberta ( also known as Bobbie), Peter and Phyllis live in a comfortable home in London with a wonderful mother and father as well as a maid. One day their father leaves home with two men. He is actually taken away to prison but the children do not know this at first. When he leaves and does not come back, they have to move to a poor cottage in the country (rural area) near a railway station. The children become familiar with the passing trains, the workers at the train station and signal-box, and life in a small town while their mother struggles to make ends meet by writing stories. They learn to live with what little they have and they get used to being poor. They also learn not to steal coal from the railway station, even if they have so little to keep warm. They have various adventures - stopping a train when a landslide covers the tracks, finding an injured older boy in the train tunnel and getting help, while dealing with the mystery of their fathers disappearance. Sometimes they argue and have crises, but in time they make many new friends. They also experience amusing adventures aplenty which happen near the railway and the canal. The children develop the habit of waving to the train as it goes past and sometimes the people in the coaches wave back. Their friendly gestures forge a special friendship with one person in particular, who goes by in the train. He then eventually gets to know them, and helps them out in various ways. Then, one day a train calls at the station and the children are pleasantly surprised to see their father. They are finally re-united. 11
  14. 14. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN NOVEL Elements PLOT SUMMARYCHAPTER 1 : THE BEGINNING OF THINGSOne night at their home in London, Father, Mother, Roberta (also known as Bobbie), Peterand Phyllis are talking about Peter‟s broken model engine when there is a knock on the frontdoor. Two gentlemen come to see Father and talk for a long time. Father speaks briefly withMother and mysteriously leaves home. The next morning, Mother leaves for London andreturns in the evening, looking tired. She requests the children to be good while she is awayand not to ask any question about Father. Several horrid weeks go by and one morning,Mother tells the children that they are moving to a little white house near a railway line in thecountry. They take the train and arrive at their new home in the dark.CHAPTER 2 : PETER AND THE COALThe family do not get a decent supper as they think Mrs.Viney has not prepared it for them.Mother prepares what she can and off they go to bed. The next morning, the children wakeup feeling excited in their new home. They discover that a nearby field backs onto a railwayline but the railway station is too far to see from where they are. Before supper the childrendecides to go to the railway station. They have a lot to see and a large heap of coal catchesPeter‟s attention. When Peter steals coal from the station yard, he is caught by the StationMaster. Peter thinks that taking some coal from the middle of the heap is harmless. TheStation Master warns them that what they have done is stealing because the coal belongs tothe railway station. It is only then they realise what they have done is wrong. 12
  15. 15. CHAPTER 3 : THE OLD GENTLEMANBy now the children know the time when the trains pass. Every morning they will wave to anold gentleman who always waves back at them. They pretend that the old man knows theirfather and takes their love to him in London. One day, their mother becomes very ill andBobbie resolves to do something positive to help. The children paint the words, "LOOK OUTAT THE STATION" on a large white sheet and wave it at the 9.15 train the next day. Whenthe train is about ready to leave, Phyllis passes a letter to the Old Gentleman. In theevening, a large box of supplies is delivered to the children with all the things they haveasked for.CHAPTER 4 : BOBBIE‟S RIDEWhen their mother finally recovers from her illness, they confess to her what they have doneearlier. The family later celebrates Bobbie‟s 12th birthday, all dressed in their best. Bobbiereceives various presents from the family including Peter who reluctantly has to give her thebroken half of his toy train filled with sweets. Her lovely birthday party however ends on asad note when she realises that her mother is very upset later that night. Bobbie secretlywants to repair Peter‟s broken train. She goes to the station and accidentally gets into theengine of one of the trains. Feeling scared, she seeks help from two railway workers. Thetwo men not only repair the toy train but also make sure she arrives home safely. Weekslater, Bobbie introduces Peter and Phyllis to the friendly engine driver and Jim, the fireman.CHAPTER 5 : SAVING THE TRAINThe children witness a landslide that covers the railway line. The children prevent animminent accident by waving the girls‟ red petticoats. The train comes to rest just in time,at about twenty metres from where Bobbie stands on the tracks. Weeks later, aceremony is held at the station to commemorate the childrens bravery. The OldGentleman presents the children with a gold watch each and meets their mother at home.The children relay the eventful day to their mother.CHAPTER 6 : A BIRTHDAY FOR PERKSThe children‟s mother has just sold a story and suggests having some cakes for tea. Bobbierequests that they have it on Perks‟ birthday and Mother agrees. Peter comes up with anidea to ask the villagers for little gifts, confident that they will give something to a person asnice as Perks. Some of the villagers are delighted with the idea but others, such as Mrs.Ransome simply brushes them off. The three children, however, go home and collectseveral roses for Mrs. Ransome since it is her birthday. That kind gesture touches Mrs.Ransome‟s heart and she gives the children several apples as well as her dead grandchild‟spram for Perks‟ son. The children bring the gifts to Perks‟ house and wait for his arrival so asto surprise him. In spite of this, Perks becomes upset as he sees the gifts as a form ofcharity. The children explain that these gifts are given sincerely and Perks relents. He asksthe three children to stay for tea. 13
  16. 16. CHAPTER 7 : THE TERRIBLE SECRETBobbie discovers the reason for her father‟s disappearance when she reads the newspaperarticle. Deeply upset, she refuses to believe that he is a spy and is imprisoned. Her motherattempts to explain that her father has been falsely accused of selling government secrets toanother country. Bobbie believes in her father‟s innocence and decides to write to the OldGentleman to clear his name.CHAPTER 8 :THE BOY IN THE RED SHIRTThe boy in red goes missing during a „hare and hounds‟ game organised by their school.Bobbie and her siblings enter the dark railway tunnel to look for him. They find him lying bythe railway track with a broken leg. Bobbie stays with the injured boy, Jim, in the dark tunnelwhile Peter and Phyllis seek help from the farm. The children take Jim home for medicalattention. They later learn that Jim is the grandchild of the Old Gentleman whom they havemet earlier. The Old Gentleman visits the little white house where Jim is taken care of.Mother offers herself to take care of Jim until he gets better. The Old Gentleman is gratefulto the family. When the Old Gentleman leaves the house, he has a private chat with Bobbieabout her father. He says that he has received the letter and has been looking into the case.He also believes that her father is innocent.CHAPTER 9 : THE MAN AT THE STATIONThe children wave at the passing 9.15 train and all the passengers respond. At the station,an overjoyed Mr. Perks, who has read about Bobbie‟s father in the newspapers, greets her.A London train stops at the station and Bobbie sees her father return after serving hissentence in prison. They return home happy and reunited. 14
  17. 17. PLOT SUMMARY BASED ON FREYTAG‟S PYRAMID The children have various adventures. First, they One day, Perks gives Bobbie some old newspapers and magazines. She is discover a heap of coal at the station yard. Peter takes horrified to notice a newspaper headline announcing her father‟s conviction some coal home and stacks them at the back of the and sentence. Knowing that he is innocent, Bobbie resolves to rescue him. house but he gets caught by the station master. The She writes a letter to the Old Gentleman. children also sit on the fence waiting for the train to pass by. They develop the habit of waving to the train as it goes past. Their friendly gestures make them one special friend in particular, a distinguished Old CLIMAX Gentleman who eventually gets to know them. Then, Mother falls sick. The children seek help from the Old Gentleman. One day, they stop a train when a landslide covers the tracks by creating red warning flags to save it. These kind children even ask around The children continue with their adventures. One the village for birthday presents for Perks, a porter. day, they watch a „Hare and Hounds‟ game that Perks is initially furious, but is touched when the leads them to the dark tunnel. One of the children convince him the gifts are a mark of respect „hounds‟ fails to appear from the dark tunnel. The from the villagers. children go in to investigate. They find the injured „hound‟ (Jim) and rescue him. RISING ACTION FALLING ACTION Roberta (Bobbie), Peter and Phyllis are children of a fairly wealthy family. They live a happy and stable life with their parents in London. However, things change One day, a train from London when their father is mysteriously halts and Bobbie sees a tall figure taken away from their home. Then, on the platform. She embraces the the family moves to a country tall man who is her father. The house near a railway line. family is reunited.EXPOSITION (BEGINNING) RESOLUTON (ENDING) 15
  18. 18. CHARACTERSMain Characters Character Characteristics Textual Evidence ROBERTA (BOBBIE) A twelve-year old girl Twelve lighted candles on it, one for each of Bobbie‟s years. (p 22) Eldest child of the ....she was always called Bobbie, and family was the oldest. (p 1) Very determined „Mother must have those things,‟ said Bobbie. „The doctor said so. How can we get them for her? Think, everybody, just as hard as you can‟. (p 17) Caring Bobbie picked up the box with Peter‟s toy engine inside it. „I…I wanted to ask if you could mend this,‟ she explained and took the engine out of the box.‟ (p 26) „Why didn‟t you go with them?‟ he said. „Someone had to stay with you,‟ said Bobbie. „I must put out the candles or it will burn itself out.‟ (p 49) Resourceful „You must go and get help, „ said Bobbie quickly. I‟ll stay with him. You take the longest bit of candle, but be quick.‟(p 48) She used Peter‟s knife to cut off the boot, then she looked at the broken leg. „It needs something soft under it,‟ she thought, and then remembered her petticoat. She took it off and carefully put it under the boy‟s leg. (p 49) 16
  19. 19. Sensitive It was a lovely birthday. But later that night, Bobbie came silently down the stairs to get her presents. She saw her mother sitting at the table, with a pen and some writing paper in front of her. „She‟s writing to Father,‟ thought Bobbie. (p 23) „It‟s my birthday, and she doesn‟t want me to know she‟s unhappy,‟ thought Bobbie. (p 24) Responsible Then Bobbie fetched coal and wood, and lit a fire. It was a strange supper – tomatoes, potato chips, dried fruit and cake. And they drank water out of tea- cups. After supper, they put sheets and blankets on the beds, the mother went to her own room.(p 7)PETER Second child and the Next came Peter...(p 1) only boy Wants to be an ...who wanted to be an engineer when engineer he grew up. (p 1) Courageous „Perhaps he‟s had an accident,‟ said Peter, „Let‟s go and look.‟ (p 46) Adventurous On their last night in the house, Peter had to sleep on the floor, which he enjoyed very much. „I like moving,‟ he said. (p 4 and 5) „Where shall we go?„ said Bobbie, although she already knew the answer. „To the railway, of course!‟ cried Peter (p 9) „It was very exciting!‟said Peter. (p 10) Innocent „I didn‟t think it was stealing,‟ said Peter. „There‟s so much coal here. I took some from the middle of the heap, and I – I thought nobody would mind. And Mother says we‟re too poor to have a fire...‟ (p 14) Quick thinking „We need something red. Then we could go down on the line and wave it,‟ said Peter. „Everyone knows that red means danger, and the train would stop.‟ (p 29) 17
  20. 20. PHYLLIS Youngest And the youngest was Phyllis, who was always trying to be good. (p 1) Insecure They went inside the dark…Immediately, the candle went out. „Oh, I wish we hadn‟t come!‟ said Phyllis. (pgs 6,7) There was a low noise on the railway line… „Let me go back!‟ cried Phyllis. (p 47) Naïve The boy in the red shirt was on the ground, beside the line. His eyes were closed and he did not move when they reached him. “Is...he dead?” asked Phyllis.(p 47)MOTHER Homely Mother was almost always at home, ready to play with the children, or to read to them to the children to them. (p 1) Protective We have to play „being poor‟ for a while. (p 4) Practical „Then we can‟t have any supper,‟ said Phyllis, unhappily. „Yes, we can. We can unpack one of the boxes. There‟s some food from the old house.‟ (p 7) Resourceful Mother spent every day in her room, writing stories. Sometimes she managed to sell a story to a magazine, and then there were cakes for tea. (p 12) Caring ...ready to play with the children, or to read to them. (p 1) Proud „Now listen, it‟s true that we‟re poor.‟ she told them, „but you must not tell anyone. And you must never, never ask strangers to give you things.‟ (p 21)FATHER Tolerant ...who was never angry ... (p 1) A civil servant/ The children knew that Father worked government officer in a Government office. (p 4) Wonderful … always ready to play a game. (p 1) Caring Of course there‟s hope! I‟ll mend it on Saturday (p 3) Wrongly accused FIVE YEARS IN PRISON FOR SPY! And the name of the spy was her father. (p 40) 18
  21. 21. OLD GENTLEMAN Friendly … And a hand waved back! It was holding a newspaper and it belonged to an old gentleman.(p 15) Kind and Helpful „The old gentleman asked me to bring it,‟ he (Perks) said. Perks left, and the children opened the box. Inside were all the things they have asked for… (pgs 19, 20) „When I read about your father in the newspaper at the time, I began trying to find out things‟ (p 52) A very nice and ...they spent a happy two hours with PERKS friendly railway porter Porter, a nice friendly man called Perks (p 17). and there stood Perks, the friendly Porter,… (p 19) “Perks is nice to everybody” (p 34) Hardworking He says he doesn‟t keep birthdays anymore, because he has other things to keep – his wife and children ! (p 34) „And other people said you were kind and polite and hardworking.‟ said Bobbie. (p 38) Proud „I‟m not having any of it! We‟ve managed all these years, asking people for nothing, and I‟m not going to start taking things now. We may be poor, but we don‟t need charity.‟ (p 38) Reasonable „I – I won‟t,‟ said Perks, quietly…I take every word I said. I-I don‟t know if I were ever so pleased...not only with the presents, but with the kind thoughts of our neighbours.‟ (pgs 38, 39) Responsible „I am pleased to give something to Mr. Perks. He always pays his bills. (p 38) 19
  22. 22. MRS RANSOME Sensitive „It‟s my birthday tomorrow,‟ said old Mrs. Ransome at the post office. „Nobody will remember mine. Why should I give anything to Perks? Go away!‟ (p 35) Appreciative „I want to thank you for the roses.‟ she said. (p 36) Generous „And here is your box,‟ said Mrs. Ransome, giving it back to them. It was full of shiny red apples.(p 36) „The Perks children will like them. And I‟ve got a pram in the back of the shop.‟ (p 36) DR FOREST Hopeful „I expect you want to be nurse,‟ Dr. Forest said to Bobbie, after he had seen the mother. „Your mother is ill and must stay in bed…‟ (p 17) Responsible „I‟ll send some medicine for her, but she will need fruit and milk, and some other special things that I‟ll write down on a piece of paper for you.‟ (p 17) MRS. VINEY A woman from the „ Who‟s she?‟ asked Bobbie. „ A village woman from the village. I asked her to clean the place and make our supper,‟ said Mother. (p 6) Responsible There‟s a letter from Mrs. Viney,‟ explained Mother. „Her son broke his arm and she went home early. She‟s coming again later this morning.‟ (p 8) 20
  23. 23. SETTINGPlace Setting A home in London (pgs 1,2 ) Little white house in the country that stands in a field near the top of a hill. (p 8) The railway station (p 10) The railway lines (p 11) The railway tunnel (p 43) The village ( pgs. 34,35 )Social Setting Edwardian times - petticoats (p. 29), large heap of coal which steam trains used for their engines (p 10), telegraph (p 10)Cultural Setting British setting – having tea (p 1) , tea-time (p 41), „...stay to tea‟ (p 39) make our supper (which means dinner to other cultures) (p 6), high hats and long coats (p 32) 21
  24. 24. THEMESThe Importance of a Family1. There is a strong bond in the family. Mother was almost always at home, ready to play with the children, or read to them…(p 1) they also had a wonderful father who was never angry, and always ready to play a game (p 1) the children did not forget their father, ... (p 12) 2. The children are always together - at the railway line, railway station and even when they collect gifts for Perks. „Let‟s go and look at the railway,‟ said Peter. (p 8) …the children went to fetch the presents which other people had promised… (p 36)Hope and Optimism1. Father is always positive with his children that everything shall be fine. „Of course, there‟s hope!‟ said Father, smiling. „I‟ll mend it on Saturday, and you can all help me.‟ (p 3)2. Bobbie has high hopes that the old man can help her seek the truth about her father‟s innocence. But Bobbie did think about it. She did not talk to Peter or Phyllis, but she wrote a letter – to the old gentleman. (p 42)3. The old man believes that Bobbie‟s father is innocent. „I haven‟t done much yet but I have hopes, my dear – I have hopes.‟ (p 52)The Joys of Childhood1. The family is fortunate to move to a country house that many would dream of living in. They do not go to school; hence, they fully enjoy their privileged freedom and have some adventures at their neighbouring railway line. The three siblings have more adventures than they ever did in London. They spend a lot of their time on their own as their mother has to work. They have a freedom they never had before. The children did not go to school now …and Mother spent every day in her room, writing stories. (p12) The children could not keep away from the railway... (p 15) 22
  25. 25. Kindness Brings Reward1. As a note of appreciation to Perks for being nice, his birthday is celebrated with much kindness and benevolence from the children as well as the villagers But other people gave things – a pipe, a tin of tea, a walking stick – and others promised to give small presents too. (p 35)The Loss of Innocence1. The children have been formerly sheltered from a life of hardship and led a comfortable life. However, after their circumstances change, they have to learn and, over time, discover the harsh truth of poverty. „Mother must have those things,‟ said Bobbie. „The doctor said so. How can we get them for her? Think, everybody, just as hard as you can.‟ (p 17) „We have to play “being poor” for a while.‟ (p 4) „Can we light a fire?‟ asked Bobbie. „We can‟t have fires in June,‟ said Mother. „Coal is very expensive.‟ (p 12)Justice Shall Prevail1. The father of Bobbie, Peter and Phyllis is an innocent man being falsely imprisoned for spying. He is finally vindicated with the help of the Old Gentleman. He held her hand and said, „You must go in by yourself, and tell Mother very quietly that it‟s all right. They‟ve caught the man who did it. Everyone knows now that your Daddy isn‟t a spy.‟ „We always knew you weren‟t,‟ said Bobbie. (p 57)Coping with Hardship1. The characters in this novel are resilient and courageous as they go through hardship and difficulties without complaints or despair. „We can‟t take everything,‟ Mother told them. „Just the necessary things. We have to play “being poor” for a while.‟ On their last night in the house Peter had to sleep on the floor, which he enjoyed very much. „I like moving,‟ he said. (pgs 4,5) Then Bobbie fetched coal and wood, and lit a fire. It was a strange supper – tomatoes, potato chips, dried fruit and cake. And they drank water out of tea-cups.2. Despite being thrown into poverty, the children‟s mother does not use it as an excuse to deprive the children of having one or two pleasures in life. „I‟ve sold another story, darlings,‟ she said. „We can have cakes for tea.‟ (p 34)3. The children are deprived of school, and Mother has to write stories to put food on the table. Yet they are told that they are not to depend on others. The children did not go to school now, and Mother spent every day in her room, writing stories. Sometimes she managed to sell a story to a magazine, and then there were cakes for tea. (p 12) „Mother said we weren‟t to ask people for things.‟ (p 34) 23
  26. 26. Resourceful and Innovative1. The children send danger signals to stop the train by making flags from red petticoats.2. Bobbie uses her petticoat to support Jim‟s broken leg in the tunnel while waiting for help. They cut the petticoats into six pieces and put them on to sticks (p 29) Bobbie uses her petticoat to support Jim‟s broken leg in the... „It needs something soft under it,‟ she thought, and then remembered her petticoat. She took it off and carefully put it under the boy‟s leg. (p 49)Naivety1. Peter is naive to think that no one would notice if he takes coal from the middle of the heap. Taking coal from the middle of the heap goes unnoticeable. Peter denies he is stealing the coal when caught by the Station Master. He isn‟t sure that he is stealing. (pgs13, 14) „I‟m not a thief,‟ said Peter, but he did not sound very sure about it. (pgs 13, 14)Bravery1. The children risk their lives to prevent a train accident. They try to stop the train by standing on the railway line (pgs 30,31) The children enter the dark tunnel to look for the last „hound in a red shirt‟ (p 46)2. Mother is being brave and patient with the children. Bobbie saw her face when she turned away. „Oh, Mother,‟ she thought. „How brave you are! How I love you!‟ (p 5)3. Bobbie was determined to make the train stop at the risk of her own life. She ran on to the line, waving her two flags (p 30) Bobbie did not move from the line. She waved and waved her flags, shouting, „Stop, stop!‟ as the big black engine came towards her. (p 31)4. Bobbie writes a letter to the Old Gentleman to seek justice for her father. My Dear Friend, You see what is in this newspaper. It is not true. Father never did it… (p 42) 24
  27. 27. VALUESThe novel teaches us to be responsible1. The children are very responsible. All day, they helped Mother to unpack and arrange everything in the rooms. (p 9)2. The mother is responsible in taking care of her children‟s welfare. …Mother spent every day in her room, writing stories. Sometimes she managed to sell a story to a magazine, and then there were cakes for tea. (p 12)3. Mrs Viney is a responsible person in the sense that she prepares the meals and cleans the house as instructed. There was a table in the little square room, and on the table was their supper. (p 8)The novel teaches us to be able to stand proud even when we are poor.1. The Mother has a very strong sense of moral conviction that she does not see the need to seek help from others as long as she can hold the fort. „Now listen, it‟s true that we‟re very poor,‟ she told them, „but you must not tell anyone. And you must never, never ask strangers to give you things.‟ (p 21)2. Perks may be poor, but he does not want charity. “I‟m not having any of it. We‟ve managed all these years, asking people for nothing and I‟m not going to start taking things now. We may be poor, but we don‟t need charity.” (p 38)The novel teaches us to be benevolent and generous1. G.P (The Old Gentleman) is very benevolent when he responds to their pleas for the things that the doctor said their mother required. He gave the children more than what they have actually asked for. Here are the things you need. Your mother will want to know where they came from. Tell her they were sent by a friend who heard she was ill (p. 20)2. The villagers gave various presents to Perks for his birthday. But other people gave things – a pipe, a tin of tea, a walking stick – and other promised to give small presents, too. (p 35) 25
  28. 28. The novel teaches us to be helpful.1. When Jim hurts his leg in the tunnel during the paper chase, the children help him. „The others came out, but you didn‟t. So we came to look for you.‟ (p 47)The novel teaches us that we must show our appreciation.1. The children are given an invitation from the Secretary of the Railway Company as appreciation for their brave act as in the following letter: Dear Sir and Ladies – we would like to say thank you for saving the train and stopping a very bad accident. Please come to the station at the three o‟clock on the 30th of the month, if this is a suitable day. (p 31) It was a very special day indeed… Then everybody sat down and an important man got up to speak. He said nice things about the children – how brave and clever they were - … (pgs 31,32)The novel teaches us that we must be honest1. The children admit to their mother about writing to the Old Gentleman despite knowing that she would be upset about it. Then it was time for the children to tell Mother what they had done. It was not easy, but they had to do it... „We‟re sorry,‟ said Phyllis and Peter, crying too.(p 21)2. The children admit to stealing the coal. „We did it too,‟ Bobbie told the Station Master. (p 14) 26
  29. 29. POINT OF VIEW As the narrator, I am the master storyteller! Its up to me to keep the story alive and interesting with exciting detail. So, I tell everything with expression and excitement! NarratorThe novel is being told in the third person‟s point of view. LITERARY DEVICESSimileThen a noise seemed to come from inside the walls of the house. It sounded like smallanimals running up and down.(pgs 6,7)„Oh!‟ said Bobbie, when it had gone. „ It was like a great wild animal going by!‟ (p 10)„Oh! my Daddy, my Daddy!‟ cried Bobbie.That scream went like a knife into the heart of everyone on the train. (p 57)OnomatopoeiaBut after three days, the engine went BANG! (p 2)ForeshadowingIn the opening chapter, the writer gives the reader what will happen later on in a novel .„ Is there not hope?‟ said Peter„Of course there’s hope!‟ said Father, smiling. „I‟ll mend it on Saturday, and you can all helpme.‟ (p 3)PersonificationThe next moment, the railway lines began to shake and the train came screaming out ofthe tunnel. (p 10)But the trees and the flowers all seemed to be waiting for something to happen. (p 55)ImageryHe put his large hand over her small one. (p 49) 27
  30. 30. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN PRE-ACTIVITY 1 Judging the book cover Time : 80 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To encourage students to predict the plot of the story 2. To design a suitable cover for the short story MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 1 3. Coloured markers 2. Mahjong papers STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Divide students into groups. 2. Distribute the various covers of the novel „The Railway Children‟ (refer to Worksheet 1). 3. Ask students to predict what the story is about in five sentences based on the book covers. 4. Distribute the mahjong papers and coloured markers to each group and ask students to illustrate a new cover for the book based on their predictions. 5. Students present this to the class. For Lower English Proficiency (LEP), teachers can either: a) brainstorm words, phrases or sentences to help them write out the sentences b) provide students with guide words, phrases or sentences to describe the covers.THE RAILWAY CHILDREN ACTIVITY 1 28
  31. 31. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WORKSHEET 1 Judging the book coverPredict what the story is about in five sentences. _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ 29
  32. 32. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN PRE-ACTIVITY 2 Guess what? Time : 40minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To give one‟s opinion 2. To make predictions MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 2 STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Divide the class into groups of 5 2. Distribute worksheet to each member of the groups. 3. Ask students to read and look for the meanings of the words provided in the worksheet using the dictionary. 4. Get students to discuss and guess the title and what the story is about. 5. Get a representative from each group to present their prediction. 6. Discuss the predictions from all the groups with the class. Groups can present their work in graphic form or using illustrations. 30
  33. 33. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WORKSHEET 2 Guess what?1. Find the meanings of the words in the clouds below.2. Discuss and answer the questions that follow. telegraph wires railway porter lines steam Station engines master fireman engine tunnel driver1. Guess what the story is about. ___________________________________________________________________________2. Suggest a suitable title of your choice for the novel. ___________________________________________________________________________3. Explain to the class why you have chosen this title. ___________________________________________________________________________ 31
  34. 34. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN PRE-ACTIVITY 3 I Wonder… Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To make predictions about what is found in the story based on the picture given 2. To participate in a discussion by suggesting, agreeing, and defending one‟s point of view . MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 3 STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Discuss the different types of trains. 2. Distribute Worksheet 3 to each student. 3. Tell students to write sentences that describe why the children are there (reasons) and what will happen (prediction) based on the picture. 4. Ask students to share their reasons and predictions with the class. 5. Discuss students‟ answers. 6. Tell students to retain Worksheet 3 with them. Compare their answers after reading Chapter 5. If the class consists of Low Proficiency students, teachers may assist by asking “WH” questions that will lead to the answers. 32
  35. 35. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WORKSHEET 3 I Wonder…Study the picture below and answer the questions that follow. Why are the children there? What do you think will happen? 1. _______________________________ 1. _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ 2. _______________________________ 2. _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ 3. _______________________________ 3. _______________________________ _______________________________ _______________________________ 33
  36. 36. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN PRE-ACTIVITY 4 Brain Train Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To use words in context . MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Sets of word cards (Worksheet 4) STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Prepare sets of word/vocabulary taken from the text. 2. Cut out the sets of words and put them in a box. 3. Tell students to pick up the words at random. 4. Tell students to construct a sentence using the words they have picked. Word cards must consist of words taken from the novel. Teacher can guide students with Lower English Proficiency by asking a few questions pertaining to unfamiliar words. Alternatively, the teacher may change the words to the level of the students‟ proficiency and level. 34
  37. 37. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WORKSHEET 4 Brain Train TRAIN PETTICOAT SPY TUNNEL THIEF PASSENGERS APPLE PIE PIPE WALKING PRAM PORTER ENGINE STICK CHARITY BILLS PRISON STATION NEWSPAPER LETTER FLAG ACCIDENT GENTLEMAN SECRET PRESENTS HONEST CHILDREN BIRTHDAY HANDKERCHIEFS PLATFORM STEAM MAGIC SUPPER POOR 35
  38. 38. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 1) WHILE ACTIVITY 1 Getting to know Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To retell what the chapter is about 2. To compare and contrast two settings 3. To form new words by combining two words MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 1 3. Text ( Chapter 1) 2. Dictionary STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Ask students to retell what the chapter is about. 2. Tell students to look up the meanings of five difficult words in Chapter 1 using the dictionary. 3. Distribute Worksheet 1 and ask students to complete Task 1 4. Get students to compare the house in London and the little white house near the railway line and complete Task 2. 5. Read Chapter 1 again and identify compound nouns. 6. Complete Task 3 of Worksheet 1. Some new words in Chapter 1 that the students may not know are: wonderful awful excitement country cart supper doorstep telegraph Students can do Post-Activity 13 as an enrichment exercise. 36
  39. 39. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 1) WHILE ACTIVITY – WORKSHEET 1 Getting to knowTask 1Read Chapter 1. Look up new words and find the meaning in a dictionary. Choose twowords that you like the most and write them below with a meaning. Word ExplanationTask 2THE BEGINNING OF THINGSAnswer the questions below.1. Write down two sentences about the children‟s lives before Father went away. i. ________________________________________________________________ ii. ________________________________________________________________2. Write down two sentences about their new home, the little white house. i. ________________________________________________________________ ii. ________________________________________________________________Task 3Match the word in the columns to make five compound nouns used in the first chapter. Thefirst one has been done for you. rail - - day door - - men birth - - thing some - - way up - - step gentle - - stairs 37
  40. 40. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 2) WHILE ACTIVITY 2 Peter and the coal Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To read and identify details in the story MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 2 2. Text (Chapter 2) STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Distribute a copy of the worksheet to each student 2. Students read the questions carefully and answer them by providing textual evidence. Read and answer questions based on Chapter 2. 38
  41. 41. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WHILE ACTIVITY - WORKSHEET 2 Peter and the coalAnswer these questions based on Chapter 2 that you have read. For answers 1 to 4,provide textual evidence from the novel and indicate the page number as well.1. Why are the children very excited in the morning? Answer: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Textual evidence: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________2. What do they have for breakfast? Do they enjoy it? Answer: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Textual evidence: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ 39
  42. 42. 3. What do they do after breakfast? Answer: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Textual evidence: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________4. Why do Bobbie think that the train was like a wild animal going by? Answer: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ Textual evidence: ___________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________5. Why do the Station Master let them off for taking the coal? Tick ( ) the statement or statements that you think are correct. a) He is a kind man b) He feel sorry for them being poor c) The children don‟t know that stealing was wrong 40
  43. 43. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 3) WHILE - ACTIVITY 3 Shout Out! Time : 40 minutes AIM ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To identify characters by matching them with the statements given MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 3 2. Text (Chapter 3) STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Distribute Worksheet 3 to each student. 2. Read the statements in Section A. 3. Identify the statements in Section A and match them with the characters in Chapter 3 of the novel. 4. Write the statements in the graphic organiser in Section B. Read and answer questions based on Chapter 3. 41
  44. 44. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 3) WHILE ACTIVITY - WORKSHEET 3 Shout Out!Read the statements in Section A . Match the statements to the characters in Chapter3.Section A A. “I haven‟t seen you at the station recently…” B. “After the trouble with the coal…” C. I expect you want to be a nurse….. your mother is ill and must stay in bed.” D. “Impossible!... we can‟t buy all those things! We‟re poor remember?” E. “Mother must have those things, the doctor said so. How can we get them for her? Think , everybody, just as hard as you can” F. “I thought I was going to miss you!” G. “I think we were right.” H. “Of course, we were right” I. “I hope Mother thinks we were right, too.”Section B – Graphic Organiser Who Said what?E.g. (i) “After the trouble with the coal…” Peter (ii) (i) (ii) (i) (ii) (i) (i) (i) 42
  45. 45. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 4) WHILE – ACTIVITY 4 ChooChoo... Corner Time : 80 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To recall an event in the story MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheets 4(a) and 4(b) 2. Text (Chapter 4) STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Ask students to talk about their own blogs or Facebook. 2. Ask students to explain some of the things that they post in their blogs or Facebook. 3. Distribute Worksheet 4(a). 4. Ask students to complete Worksheet 4 (a) based on Chapter 4. 5. Distribute Worksheet 4(b). 6. Ask students to post their status in the Choo Choo... Corner Facebook Teachers should make sure that students use standard language when posting their status in the Facebook. 43
  46. 46. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WHILE ACTIVITY - WORKSHEET 4(a) Choo Choo… CornerComplete the table below on how Bobbie celebrated her birthday by referring to Chapter 4. Who were there? What happened? What did I receive? How did I feel? 44
  47. 47. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WHILE ACTIVITY - WORKSHEET 4(b) ChooChoo… CornerImagine that you are Bobbie. Based on Chapter 4, complete your Choo Choo… CornerFacebook below by writing out how you celebrated your birthday and your feelings on thatday .Cho Choo… Corner What‟s on your mind? It was a wonderful day today. I celebrated my…………............... …………………………………………………………………………. …………………………………………………………………………. We were …………………………………………………………....... …………………………………………………………………………. ………………………………………………………………………… I received wonderful………………………………………………… …………………………………………………………………………. …………………………………………………………………………. Unfortunately, a wonderful day…………………………………..… ………………………………………………………………………… Share 45
  48. 48. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 5) WHILE - ACTIVITY 5 Saviours of the train Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To identify and sequence events in the story MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 5 3. Text (Chapter 5) 2. Handout 5 4. Scissors and glue STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Get students to work in pairs. 2. Read Chapter 5 “Saving the Train” silently. 3. Let each pair of students sequence the events in Handout 5. 4. Cut the boxes in Handout 5. 5. Paste the events according to the sequence onto the coaches of the train in Worksheet 5. 6. Display work on the notice board. Teachers may add more coaches if the students can manage more details of the events that are found in Chapter 5 – Saving the Train 46
  49. 49. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 5) WHILE ACTIVITY - HANDOUT 5 Saviours of the trainRead the events in the boxes below. Cut the boxes and paste them onto the coaches of thetrain given in the Worksheet 5 according to the sequence of events. The children The driver wave flags made managed to stop from the sisters‟ While they were the train just in there, they saw red petticoats. some of the trees time moving.    The three A ceremony is children have held at the station saved the day. to commemorate the children‟s bravery.   After several One day, Bobbie, minutes, the train A few seconds Peter and Phyllis finally later, everything are walking approaches and at the hillside beside the railway luckily, the engine crashes down on line. driver spots them. the railway line.    47
  50. 50. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 5) WHILE ACTIVITY– WORKSHEET 5 Saviours of the trainCut the boxes in Handout 5 and paste them onto the coaches of the train below. 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 7 48
  51. 51. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 6) WHILE ACTIVITY 6 Railway Lines Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To identify characters from the novel by matching them according to their dialogues 2. To rewrite the dialogues in speech bubbles MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Text (Chapter 6) 2. Worksheet 6(a) and (b) STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Get students to work in pairs. 2. Distribute Worksheet 6(a) and 6(b) to each pair. 3. Rewrite the dialogue in the speech bubbles and match them according to the characters in Chapter 6. This activity is to be used specifically after reading Chapter Six of The Railway Children. 49
  52. 52. `THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WHILE ACTIVITY -WORKSHEET 6(a) Railway LinesMatch the dialogues below with the characters from the novel. No Lines from the novel Characters 1 “…And we‟ve brought some presents for him” 2 “I want to thank you for the roses.” 3 “What‟s that pram doing here?” 4 “I‟ve sold another story, darlings,” 5 “There must be lots of people in the village who will want to help us give him a nice birthday. Let‟s ask everybody.” 6 “Oh, yes please!” 7 “I - I‟ll never be kind to anyone again!” 8 “It‟s not charity! People were happy to give you birthday presents.” 9 “Perks has never had a birthday like it!” 10 “I showed him my brooch – the one you gave me for my birthday – and I asked him about his birthday. He says he doesn‟t keep birthdays any more, because he has other things to keep – his wife and children!” 50
  53. 53. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN WHILE ACTIVITY -WORKSHEET 6(b) Railway LinesWrite the dialogues from Worksheet 6(a) in the speech bubbles below. Mother Mrs. Ransome Mrs. Perks 51
  54. 54. Peter PerksPhyllisBobbie 52
  55. 55. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 7) WHILE - ACTIVITY 7 Criss Cross Away! Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To recall details of a text MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 7 2. Text (Chapter 7) STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Distribute Worksheet 7 to each student. 2. Find answers from Chapter Seven. 3. Discuss the answers. This activity is specifically designed for Chapter 7 of The Railway Children. 53
  56. 56. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 7) WHILE ACTIVITY- WORKSHEET 7 Criss Cross Away! 54
  57. 57. Across3. What was Bobbies reaction during tea-time?4. Bobbies mother asked her to be _______ and patient about her fathers situation.7. Where did the police find the incriminating letters that showed that Bobbies father was selling Government secrets?9. Mother said that Bobbies father was ______10. Who did Bobbie write a letter to?12. Who packed the magazines for Bobbie?14. How did the childrens mother feel when they asked questions about their father?15. The headline, „FIVE YEARS IN PRISON FOR SPY‟ refers to the children‟s ______ .16. Why did Bobbie stop to rest on her way home from the railway station? Because the magazines were too ________17. A place for the confinement of persons convicted of crimes.Down1. Who did Bobbie pass her letter to?2. How many years will the children‟s father have to serve in prison?4. Who found out about the secret?5. How did Bobbie find out about her fathers whereabouts?6. Who is Bobbies sister?8. What is the name of the childrens house?11. What is Perks occupation?13. The childrens father was falsely accused of being a ______ 55
  58. 58. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 8) WHILE - ACTIVITY 8 From A to Z Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To sequence events using sequence connectors. MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 8 2. Text (Chapter 8) STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Ask students to read Chapter 8. 2. Distribute Worksheet 8 to each student. 3. Ask students to write the events in the frames titled „First‟, „Next‟, „Then‟, „Finally‟ 4. Get students to paste or draw pictures in the space provided to illustrate the events. For Step 4, students may draw a picture to illustrate the events. 56
  59. 59. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 8) WHILE ACTIVITY - WORKSHEET 8 From A to ZWrite the events in Chapter 8 using the frames below. First Next Paste or draw picture Paste or draw picture The children watch the schoolboys One of the „hounds‟ ____________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ Then Finally Paste or draw picture Paste or draw picture The children enter the dark tunnel The children rescue ____________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ 57
  60. 60. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 9) WHILE - ACTIVITY 9 Search and Match Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To read and understand the text provided. 2. To match words with questions based on the information in the text MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Sample Word Cards 3. Text (Chapter 9) 2. Worksheet 9 STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Display the word cards (Handout 9) all around the classrooms prior to the lesson. 2. Divide the class into small groups of 3 or 4. 3. Provide Worksheet 9 to each group. 4. Tell students to search for words that match the questions in the Worksheet 9 and complete Worksheet 9. Teacher can use many word distracters to make the activity for Chapter 9 more challenging. Students can do Post Activity 17 as an enrichment exercise. 58
  61. 61. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN (CHAPTER 9) WHILE ACTIVITY - WORKSHEET 9 Search and MatchFill in the box with the correct answers.1. What do the passengers use to wave at the children from the windows of the train?2. What message do the children send as they wave at the passengers in the train?3. “I wonder if the railway misses us.” Who says that?4. What is the Father being accused of?5. Besides Bobbie and Mother, who else believes that Father is innocent? 59
  62. 62. Sample word cards Handout 9 Spying Hands Phyllis Porter Newspapers Handkerchief Old Gentleman ‘Take our love to Father’ Flag ‘LOOK OUT AT THE STATION’ 60
  63. 63. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN CHARACTER - ACTIVITY 10 Declare it’s me! Time : 40 minutes AIM ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To analyse characters in the story MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 10 2. Text STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Explain that the personality traits of a character are often revealed through dialogues. 2. Discuss the personality traits of some characters in the story. 3. Distribute a copy of Worksheet 10 to each student. 4. Get students to look for dialogues in the story that reveal the personality traits of a character. 5. Complete the tasks in Worksheet 10. 6. Get students to present their work. This activity can be done individually, in pairs or in groups. 61
  64. 64. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN CHARACTER - WORKSHEET 10 Declare it’s me!1. Name the character that you like.2. Choose a dialogue from any chapter, and write the whole dialogue of about 3 to 5 lines in the quote balloon in the graphic organiser below.3. Describe what the character‟s words tell about him or her. Character What does the character say? What does this dialogue reveal about the character? 62
  65. 65. THE RAILWAY CHILDREN SETTING - ACTIVITY 11 Some Places Speak Time : 40 minutes AIMS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. To identify and describe the settings in the novel MATERIALS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Worksheet 11 2. Text STEPS ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 1. Ask students to state some of the places mentioned in the novel. 2. Get students to write descriptions of each place written on the board. 3. Introduce the literary term „setting‟ to the class. 4. Give out the worksheet and let students use the text to fill in the blanks given. 5. Get students to complete Worksheet 11 with reference to the text. Notes for teacher: Settings in The Railway Children  A house in London (pgs 1, 2)  Little white house in the country (that stands in a field near the top of a hill) (pgs 4,6)  The railway station (p 10)  The railway lines (p 10)  The tunnel (p 10)  The village (pgs 34, 35) 63

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