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Calculate with Confidence 5 th  edition Gray Morris Mosby items and derived items © 2010 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of E...
Mosby items and derived items © 2010 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Understanding and Interpreting Medicati...
Understanding Medication Orders: Objectives <ul><li>After reviewing this chapter, you should be  </li></ul><ul><li>able to...
Objectives (cont’d) <ul><li>Identify abbreviation, acronyms, and symbols recommended by the Joint Commission (TJC) “Do Not...
Understanding Orders: Background <ul><li>PRIOR legal written order or prescription required </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Physicia...
Understanding Orders (cont’d) <ul><li>“ Physician’s Order Sheet” or “Order Sheet” </li></ul><ul><li>Noted by nurse and “un...
Understanding Orders  (cont) <ul><li>Memorization of acceptable common symbols and abbreviations is essential (Tables 11-1...
Writing Medication Orders <ul><li>Seven  ESSENTIAL  Components </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Client’s  full  name </li></ul></ul><...
Writing Medication Orders (cont’d) <ul><li>SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Medication names </li></ul><ul><ul><li...
Figure 11-2 Glucophage label. Notice the two names. The first,  Glucophage,  is the trade name, identified by the registra...
Writing Medication Orders (cont’d) <ul><li>SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Route—very important, never assume </l...
Interpreting a Medication Order <ul><li>Written in following order: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Name of medication </li></ul></u...
 
 
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Understanding And Interpreting Medicatio

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Understanding And Interpreting Medicatio

  1. 1. Calculate with Confidence 5 th edition Gray Morris Mosby items and derived items © 2010 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
  2. 2. Mosby items and derived items © 2010 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Understanding and Interpreting Medication Orders Unit Three: Chapter 11
  3. 3. Understanding Medication Orders: Objectives <ul><li>After reviewing this chapter, you should be </li></ul><ul><li>able to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the components of a medication order </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify meanings of standard abbreviations used in medication administration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interpret a given medication order </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Objectives (cont’d) <ul><li>Identify abbreviation, acronyms, and symbols recommended by the Joint Commission (TJC) “Do Not Use” list, and ISMP’s list of error-prone abbreviations, symbols, and dose designations </li></ul><ul><li>Read and write correct medical notations </li></ul>
  5. 5. Understanding Orders: Background <ul><li>PRIOR legal written order or prescription required </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, physician’s assistants – under state laws </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Oral (given verbally) and phone orders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Error prone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emergent situations by qualified staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write it, read back, get confirmation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prescriber’s signature within 24 hours </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Understanding Orders (cont’d) <ul><li>“ Physician’s Order Sheet” or “Order Sheet” </li></ul><ul><li>Noted by nurse and “unit clerk” </li></ul><ul><li>Transcribed to Medication Administration Record (MAR) or faxed to Pharmacy </li></ul><ul><li>Nurse is accountable regardless of who transcribes to MAR </li></ul><ul><li>Some facilities utilize electronically generated MARs </li></ul>
  7. 7. Understanding Orders (cont) <ul><li>Memorization of acceptable common symbols and abbreviations is essential (Tables 11-1 & 11-2) </li></ul><ul><li>Some symbols have double meaning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ID = intradermal, also means initial dose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reminder of TJC and ISMP guidelines </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Writing Medication Orders <ul><li>Seven ESSENTIAL Components </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Client’s full name </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Date and time written </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Name of medication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dosage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Route </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Frequency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Signature of prescriber or proxy </li></ul></ul>If parts are missing – order is NOT legal and should NOT be filled!
  9. 9. Writing Medication Orders (cont’d) <ul><li>SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Medication names </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Trade = proprietary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Generic = “proper” or chemical name </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Caution – look-alike or sound-alike names </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dosage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Amount and strength clear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Units” (TJC & ISMP) </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Figure 11-2 Glucophage label. Notice the two names. The first, Glucophage, is the trade name, identified by the registration symbol ®. The name in smaller and different print is metformin hydrochloride, the generic or official name.
  11. 11. Writing Medication Orders (cont’d) <ul><li>SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Route—very important, never assume </li></ul><ul><li>Frequency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Standard abbreviations and meaning (q.i.d., t.i.d.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Signatures—legibility and co-signing </li></ul><ul><li>Special instructions—clear </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hold if… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>½ hour before… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For blood pressure greater than… </li></ul></ul>NEVER ASSUME – CLARIFY IF IN DOUBT!
  12. 12. Interpreting a Medication Order <ul><li>Written in following order: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Name of medication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dosage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Route </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Frequency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Example: Colace 100 mg p.o. t.i.d. </li></ul><ul><li>     </li></ul><ul><li>(name) (dose) (route) (freq) </li></ul>

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