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BUILD YOUR FRAMEWORK ACTIVITY
Create a visual map, flowchart, or storyboard to guide you in the course design process. Thi...
DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT
Sometimes, the most difficult decision can be deciding which learning activities will be
redesigned t...
– Deliver basic information
about the course and the
used technology/tools
– Get to know each other
– Establish learning g...
Leverage 3rd Party Tools
Considerations:
1. What activities work well in your
face-to-face classroom?
2. What activities do you think could
be seam...
Reflective Practice
What did I LEARN? How can I USE what I learned?
Intentional Course Design for Blended Learning
Intentional Course Design for Blended Learning
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Intentional Course Design for Blended Learning

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Intentional Course Design presentation from Open SUNY.

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Intentional Course Design for Blended Learning

  1. 1. BUILD YOUR FRAMEWORK ACTIVITY Create a visual map, flowchart, or storyboard to guide you in the course design process. This blueprint can help you see the overall organization of your course contents and activities and their relationship to one another. To begin: 1. Look over your course syllabus/schedule and identify specific course topics or modules/units of study. List each element separately on sticky notes. These are your categories or overall course themes. 2. Next, identify the learning outcomes for each topic area. What will students be able to do upon completion of the module? Write these outcomes under the topic. 3. Identify activities you do in each module that help students achieve the learning outcomes. These are specific things the students do in the course. Some activities may overlap modules or be cumulative over the duration of the course. List these individually on separate post-it notes and stick them under their correlating module or topic. 4. Finally, determine how you measure student success and achievement for each activity. Write the measurement on a post-it note and place it next to or under the learning activity.
  2. 2. DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT Sometimes, the most difficult decision can be deciding which learning activities will be redesigned to suit the online environment. Since the online environment can be more conducive to student-centered learning, you may need to rethink how you will structure your instructional activities for this environment. Considerations: • What activities work well in your face-to-face classroom? • What activities do you think could be seamlessly transferred to the online environment? • What activities do you think need to be redesigned for the online environment? • What content should be taught, and in what order? Do you need to let something go? Add something new? • How will the learner demonstrate what he or she has learned?
  3. 3. – Deliver basic information about the course and the used technology/tools – Get to know each other – Establish learning groups and rules for group work – Present group work spaces – Carry out exams and evaluations – “Attend” a virtual performance, presentation, training session by an expert in the field – Assess practical skills such as counselor-client or nurse- patient interactions – Use blogs to reflect on learning experiences – Create a threaded discussion for learners to access after training lets them stay in touch with classmates to ask questions, share insights, and post resources – Provide a list of available resources for additional information on a topic of study – Access experts (via video, podcast, chat, etc.) who are unable to attend a classroom session – Complete “pre-work” (readings with quizzes, case studies, team discussions, study modules, videos, etc.) to prepare students for a new module or unit Rethinking Content Presentation
  4. 4. Leverage 3rd Party Tools
  5. 5. Considerations: 1. What activities work well in your face-to-face classroom? 2. What activities do you think could be seamlessly transferred to the online environment? 3. What activities do you think need to be redesigned for the online environment? 4. What content should be taught, and in what order? Do you need to let something go? Add something new? 5. How will the learner demonstrate what he or she has learned? Suggestions: 1. What activities might you need to let go of? Are there things that are artifacts year after year? 2. How might you enhance items such as lecture notes and PowerPoint presentations? Consider multiple modalities for presenting your content. 3. Take this as an opportunity to reconsider how your content is packaged for the learner. Can you incorporate a higher level of engagement, or play to other learning preferences? 4. The LMS is a vehicle for content organization. Consider your structure and be sure it aligns with your course timeline. 5. Be sure to review your assessments and consider alternatives to formative models. Build in activities that measure student learning instead of strictly relying on tests to get at what students know. Consider reflective practice.
  6. 6. Reflective Practice What did I LEARN? How can I USE what I learned?

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