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From Network Revolutions and
Trends in Information to a
National Public Policy Agenda
for Libraries
Marc Gartler
Handouts: Agenda foreword
Handouts: Agenda exec. brief
Handouts: the whole Agenda
Handouts: Trends exec summary
A National Public Policy Agenda
Policy Challenges
Policy decision maker:
“I love libraries, and used to go there all the
time. Before the internet. Loved ...
Policy Challenges
IT manager: “As directed by the County Board,
our fiber network will reach all public safety
buildings b...
Policy Challenges
Librarian 1:
“Libraries are essential to literacy”
Librarian 2:
“Libraries really aren’t about books any...
Policy Challenges
School librarian: “We help kids learn”
Public librarian: “We help job seekers”
Academic librarian: “We f...
So, what’s the best message…
• …for the next 5 years?
• …given the political environment?
• …where it’ll have an impact?
A scan outside the library sphere
• Implications for libraries and public access to
information?
• opportunities and compe...
Not a handout today (91 pages)
Wheeler on network revolutions
1. Printing press = info explosion, spread of
knowledge
2. Railroads = speed of transport
3...
Wheeler on network revolutions
4. Digital =
– “end of the tyranny of place”
– acceleration of info use & transmission
– De...
Key tech trends
• Mobile
– #1 economic impact
– by 2025 will have twice the economic impact as
#2—automation of knowledge ...
Key tech trends
• Augmented reality
– Increased desire to disconnect?
– augmented reality may have a localizing force as
w...
Key tech trends
• Internet of things
– Increased ability to change the physical world via
remote interfaces
– Physical wor...
Big tech employment
• Google—55,000 employees
– 30,000+ in Mountain View
– 2,292 in 2004
• Apple—38,000 (excluding retail)...
Trouble ahead
• Digital overload
• Digital divides
• Continued job losses
– Lawyers & radiologists perform data analysis…
...
Implications for libraries
• Will providing access to computers/internet
become an irrelevant library service?
• How will ...
Implications for libraries
• How might developments in human computer
interaction reshape library experience?
• Could aspe...
Discussion of one implication
• How might libraries help with information
overload?
Publishing trends
• Who controls value in the book industry?
• How will traditional relationships between
publishers, auth...
Publishing trends
• Information access; business/revenue models;
new competitors; DRM & piracy
Global context
• Global opportunities for some, unrest for
others
• Climate change  shortage, conflict,
migration
• 1-3 b...
Implications for libraries
• Veterans
• Refugees
• Info role during epidemics
• Facilitating open government and use of
pu...
Other trends examined
• Environmental
• Demographics: bigger, older, more diverse
• Rising inequality
• Public sector budg...
Back to our National Agenda
• From “nice to have” to “essential”
• Speak with a common voice
• Draft strategic communicati...
Message development
• Education & Learning
• Employment & Entrepreneurship
• Health & Wellness
• Government Information
• ...
Message development
• Funding
• Copyright & licensing
• Digital content systems
• Privacy
• Broadband
• Library functions ...
The E's of Libraries™
“Today's libraries, with the Expert assistance of
library professionals, help facilitate
Education, ...
Marc Gartler
mgartler@madisonpubliclibrary.org
@gliblib
From Network Revolutions and Trends in Information to a National Public Policy Agenda for Libraries
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From Network Revolutions and Trends in Information to a National Public Policy Agenda for Libraries

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Marc Gartler, Manager, Madison Public Library – Sequoya & Alicia Ashman Libraries

A member of the advisory committee for ALA’s Policy Revolution! will facilitate a discussion about trends and challenges identified in research by the ALA Office of Information Technology Policy. These trends and their implications are guiding the formation of a national public policy agenda that will guide focused and energetic outreach to key decision makers and influencers.

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From Network Revolutions and Trends in Information to a National Public Policy Agenda for Libraries

  1. 1. From Network Revolutions and Trends in Information to a National Public Policy Agenda for Libraries Marc Gartler
  2. 2. Handouts: Agenda foreword
  3. 3. Handouts: Agenda exec. brief
  4. 4. Handouts: the whole Agenda
  5. 5. Handouts: Trends exec summary
  6. 6. A National Public Policy Agenda
  7. 7. Policy Challenges Policy decision maker: “I love libraries, and used to go there all the time. Before the internet. Loved them.”
  8. 8. Policy Challenges IT manager: “As directed by the County Board, our fiber network will reach all public safety buildings by 2016.” Citizen: “No libraries?” IT manager: “No. Why would we run the network to the libraries?”
  9. 9. Policy Challenges Librarian 1: “Libraries are essential to literacy” Librarian 2: “Libraries really aren’t about books anymore”
  10. 10. Policy Challenges School librarian: “We help kids learn” Public librarian: “We help job seekers” Academic librarian: “We facilitate innovation” Policy maker: “Okay…good to know.”
  11. 11. So, what’s the best message… • …for the next 5 years? • …given the political environment? • …where it’ll have an impact?
  12. 12. A scan outside the library sphere • Implications for libraries and public access to information? • opportunities and competitive advantages? • “Threats”? Emerging competitors? • Implications for policy advocacy for libraries
  13. 13. Not a handout today (91 pages)
  14. 14. Wheeler on network revolutions 1. Printing press = info explosion, spread of knowledge 2. Railroads = speed of transport 3. Telegraph = instant communication
  15. 15. Wheeler on network revolutions 4. Digital = – “end of the tyranny of place” – acceleration of info use & transmission – Decentralization of economic & creative activity
  16. 16. Key tech trends • Mobile – #1 economic impact – by 2025 will have twice the economic impact as #2—automation of knowledge work • Big data – The quantified self: mood, blood pressure – Privacy: who should have access to my physical or mental state?
  17. 17. Key tech trends • Augmented reality – Increased desire to disconnect? – augmented reality may have a localizing force as we can find out more about what’s here – Anticipatory (e.g. Google Now) • VR – Google cardboard < $20
  18. 18. Key tech trends • Internet of things – Increased ability to change the physical world via remote interfaces – Physical world is an information system • Customizable, free, simple digital products • Human computer interaction – Speech, biometric sensing, action detection • AI
  19. 19. Big tech employment • Google—55,000 employees – 30,000+ in Mountain View – 2,292 in 2004 • Apple—38,000 (excluding retail) – 14,800 in 2005 • Amazon—25,000 (Seattle only) – Building space for 71,500 in Seattle by 2019
  20. 20. Trouble ahead • Digital overload • Digital divides • Continued job losses – Lawyers & radiologists perform data analysis… – Middle managers in knowledge work • Security – A threat to the internet is a threat to everything
  21. 21. Implications for libraries • Will providing access to computers/internet become an irrelevant library service? • How will libraries continue to integrate new IT into their operations? At what point does integration stop and re-invention stop? • How will libraries deal with threats that new IT poses to traditional library values such as privacy?
  22. 22. Implications for libraries • How might developments in human computer interaction reshape library experience? • Could aspects of librarians’ jobs be made obsolete? • Will libraries remain relevant bridging future digital divides as we move increasingly from PCs to mobile devices?
  23. 23. Discussion of one implication • How might libraries help with information overload?
  24. 24. Publishing trends • Who controls value in the book industry? • How will traditional relationships between publishers, authors, distributors, retailers, and readers change? • 11,000 books published in 1950 • 328,000 books published in 2010 • Average US nonfiction book selling < 250 copies/year
  25. 25. Publishing trends • Information access; business/revenue models; new competitors; DRM & piracy
  26. 26. Global context • Global opportunities for some, unrest for others • Climate change  shortage, conflict, migration • 1-3 billion more people coming online • Global economy – 1990: 54% of trade betw. developed economies – 2012: 28% of trade betw. developed economies
  27. 27. Implications for libraries • Veterans • Refugees • Info role during epidemics • Facilitating open government and use of public sector data
  28. 28. Other trends examined • Environmental • Demographics: bigger, older, more diverse • Rising inequality • Public sector budget shortfalls • Education: self-directed, lifelong, collaborative • Work: new skills, new structures
  29. 29. Back to our National Agenda • From “nice to have” to “essential” • Speak with a common voice • Draft strategic communications plan went to ALA Board recently • Rollout 2015-2016
  30. 30. Message development • Education & Learning • Employment & Entrepreneurship • Health & Wellness • Government Information • Heritage & History
  31. 31. Message development • Funding • Copyright & licensing • Digital content systems • Privacy • Broadband • Library functions in federal goverment • Information professionals
  32. 32. The E's of Libraries™ “Today's libraries, with the Expert assistance of library professionals, help facilitate Education, Employment, Entrepreneurship, Empowerment, and Engagement for Everyone, Everywhere” http://www.ala.org/offices/oitp/Es_of_libraries
  33. 33. Marc Gartler mgartler@madisonpubliclibrary.org @gliblib

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