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Scanning the Horizon with the Notable Reports Panel

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Jon Mark Bolthouse, Fond du Lac Public Library
Barbara Brattin, Kenosha Public Library
Nick Dimassis, Beloit Public Library
Kimberly Young, Brown County Library, Green Bay
Sara Gold, WiLS
Andrea Coffin, WiLS

Each year, a number of new reports about public libraries are produced by organizations like Pew, OCLC, Library Journal, The Aspen Institute and others. These reports contain valuable information that can help us plan, develop services and improve existing services, but, unfortunately, few of us have the time to read every one. The goal of this session is to help attendees get an overview of those reports. Each panelist will share a summary of a report they believe is significant and discuss how they have used or will use the information at their library. Attendees will be encouraged to share other reports that have mattered to them, too!

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Scanning the Horizon with the Notable Reports Panel

  1. 1. Scanning the Horizon with the Notable Reports Panel WAPL, May 8th 2015, Wisconsin Rapids Panelists Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public LIbrary Kimberly Young, Deputy Director, Brown County Library System Moderators Sara Gold, Community Liaison and Service Specialist, WiLS Andrea Coffin, Community Liaison and Service Specialist, WiLS
  2. 2. 2014 State of America’s Libraries Report ALA This relatively short and dense snapshot covers the big picture of what happened in the library world during the previous year. “As libraries continue to transform in 2014, they deepen engagement with their communities in many ways, addressing current social, economic, and environmental issues, often through partnerships with governments and other organizations.” Kimberly Young, Deputy Director, Brown County Library System
  3. 3. Importance  Broaden the scope of understanding  Provide talking points Kimberly Young, Deputy Director, Brown County Library System
  4. 4. Examples  Fun facts  Digital reading  Most challenged books of the previous year  Major trends  Social Networking  Ebook gains  Job outlook  Federal issues  Spending bill  FCC Kimberly Young, Deputy Director, Brown County Library System
  5. 5. Focus Point  Community Engagement “America’s libraries continue to transform themselves, keeping pace with the changing economic, social, and technological aspects of American society. Libraries’ deepening engagement with their communities takes many forms, from technology to education to social services, and serves many segments of the population.”  Boston  Chattanooga Kimberly Young, Deputy Director, Brown County Library System
  6. 6. Ebook Usage in US Public Libraries Library Journal Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public LIbrary
  7. 7. Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  8. 8. Public libraries that offer eBooks 95% Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  9. 9. Median number of eBooks Library has access to 10,000 Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  10. 10. Median eBook circulation for the previous fiscal year 13,500 Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  11. 11. Overall percentage change in eBook circulation 110% 25% Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  12. 12. “Our patrons LOVE ebooks.” “We don’t feel threatened…it adds another dimension to our work.” “Our enthusiastic ebook readers are also enthusiastic print readers.” “Ebook use is on the rise…but print is still ‘king.’” “The teens I interact with seem to prefer print.” “We seem to have increasing interest in backlist eBook titles” “The price we spend per eBook is outrageous….exorbitant compared to print. “Many continue to be unaware that we offer ebooks or e-audiobooks.” “I only wish we could get more staff fluent with the process” Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  13. 13. Approximately what percent of the eBooks you have available are fiction titles vs. nonfiction titles? Approximately what percent of the print books you have available are fiction titles vs. nonfiction titles? Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  14. 14. Adult vs. children’s vs. young adult eBooks Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  15. 15. Top three circulating or most requested fiction eBook categories?
  16. 16. Top three circulating or most requested nonfiction eBook categories?
  17. 17. How often do patrons say: “I need help downloading ebooks to my device.”
  18. 18. What percentage of your Library's materials budget do eBooks represent in the current year (2014)? Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library Mean: 8.6% Median: 7.6%
  19. 19. If reallocating budget to purchase eBooks, from what areas or formats?
  20. 20. Yes, Library is part of a consortium license program for its eBook collection 65%
  21. 21. From which vendor(s) does your Library acquire eBooks?
  22. 22. Which is your preferred eBook vendor? Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  23. 23. Device(s) your Library users most often use Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  24. 24. Which ereading device(s) does your Library currently have available?
  25. 25. If your policy for loaning devices is different than for other materials, please specify how
  26. 26. Trends • Acceptance high among public • Print still healthy • Parents still read to small children using print books • Electronic devices can all read eBooks • Increased desire for streamed content Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  27. 27. Closer to Home… Wisconsin Public Library Consortium Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  28. 28. 30K Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library WPLC eBooks Collection 2010 Present
  29. 29. 55K Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library Patrons with Checkouts 5K 2010 Present
  30. 30. 225K 30K 55K Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library 2010 Present Circulation Circulation, Collection, Patrons
  31. 31. Overview of Results of WPLC Digital Collections Patron Survey (March 2015) General ● Patron participation ● Most use—9.4% do not (“didn’t know it existed” 44%) ● Most respondents ranked  eBooks as most important format  Audiobooks  Streaming video  Digital magazines  Streaming music Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  32. 32. Overview of Results of WPLC Digital Collections Patron Survey (March 2015) Ebooks ● 45% checked out fewer than 5 from their physical Library in the last six months. ● 71% have purchased fewer than 5 books in last six months. ● Most popular genres:  Bestselling Fiction (1410 respondents)  Mystery/Thriller (1117)  Romance (659) ● Least popular:  Travel (139)  Business (97)  Information Technology (59) Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  33. 33. Overview of Results of WPLC Digital Collections Patron Survey (March 2015) ● 61% were either satisfied or very satisfied with full series availability ● 51% were either satisfied or very satisfied with holds/wait time for checkout ● 31% were dissatisfied or very dissatisfied ● 41% felt there were too few Bestselling Fiction titles in the collection ● “Too few” Fiction (80), Mystery (73), and Action/Adventure (71) ● “Too many” Romance (41), Erotic Literature (33), and Christian Fiction (33) Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  34. 34. Overview of Results of WPLC Digital Collections Library Survey (March 2015)  Library Staff participation  “Too few” Bestselling Fiction (53%), Bestselling Nonfiction (44%), Young Adult (36%), and Children’s (28%).  “Too many” Erotica (21%), Romance (15%), Christian Fiction (9%), and Cooking (8%).  47% rated their interest in Spanish language titles at 2 or higher (78% would add Bestsellers, 68% would add Children’s titles, and 62% would add ESL)  37% felt that local authors were somewhere or very valuable to patrons. Conference Name, Date, and Location
  35. 35. Overview of Results of WPLC Digital Collections Library Survey (March 2015)  Allocated to the $1 million buying pool an average of:  45% eBooks  audiobooks (26%)  Interactive Ebooks (8%)  Video (8%)  Magazines (7%)  Music (6%)  54% would like all patron-driven titles purchased  46% felt there should be additional considerations in purchasing recommended titles, e.g.:  $70 cap on cost of title  No pre-2000 publications  Exclude genres such as Erotica Nick Dimassis, Director, Beloit Public Library
  36. 36. Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries Aspen Institute As the knowledge and creativity economy grows, the public library stands to be the hub for communities, providing access to education, learning opportunities, technology and social connections, driving the economic growth and prosperity for all members of the community. “An intelligent community, not large circulation numbers, is the primary library goal” Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library
  37. 37. Three key assets build the library’s value proposition in the community People Place Platform Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library
  38. 38. People - Librarian as navigator, not gatekeeper (or expert of all)  Continuous extension of the definition of “librarian” is not sustainable  Leverage the library’s infrastructure to allow for domain expertise to be shared outward, to draw from the expertise in the community  Curators for the community Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library
  39. 39. Place – The Physical Library building Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library  Establishes personal connections  “Starbucks without the coffee” (Maybe!)  Provides an anchor  ...for economic development  ..for neighborhood revitalization
  40. 40. Place – The Physical Library building  Provides a safe and trusted location  health clinics  emergency response centers  small business incubators  workforce development centers  immigrant resource centers  Creates connecting places  New locations: shopping malls, airports, big box stores Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library
  41. 41. Platform  Library As “Third Place”  Interactive entity facilitating people operating individually or in groups  Coexisting with geographical area (canopy or “cloud”)  Objective and trusted platform  Library as a Service (LaaS)  abundant Wi-Fi  devices for borrowing  Content from own collection or anywhere in the cloud  Challenges ahead  decentralized model  Traditional Catalog as Platform model  No scalability  Competition of platforms (Amazon / Netflix) Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library
  42. 42. Strategies for Success  Align Library services in support of community goals  Develop community relationships  less autonomy, more collaboration  Provide access to content in all formats  broadband access  National Digital platform Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library
  43. 43. Strategies for Success  Ensure the long-term sustainability of public libraries  Funding models  alternative governance structures  outcomes rather than outputs  Cultivate leadership  vision (for the library and community)  communication with community leaders  go beyond the walls of the library  Libraries as connection between CBOs and citizens Jon Mark Bolthouse, Library Director, Fond du Lac Public Library
  44. 44. The Next Library and the People Who Will Use It PEW Internet Research Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  45. 45. Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  46. 46. PEW REPORTS LIBRARIES.PEWINTERNET.ORG Library User Quiz: Community Version June 30, 2014 How does your community’s library engagement compare with the rest of the country? June 30, 2014 How Americans Value Public Libraries in Their Communities December 11, 2013 Parents, Children, Libraries, and Reading May 01, 2013 “Libraries of the future” April 04, 2013 Should libraries shush? February 06, 2013 Innovative library services “in the wild” January 29, 2013
  47. 47. The Next Library and the People Who Will Use It How the Concept of the Library Can Change to Meet New Realities
  48. 48. New Library built around 5 insights Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  49. 49. Insight #1 Where we stand in the public eye 90% say libraries are important to their communities EVEN THOUGH 31% said they know not much or nothing at all of what their libraries offer 80% say the book is still very important 98% of visitors say their experience is pleasant Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  50. 50. Insight #2 Who Patrons Are and What They Want
  51. 51. Insight #2 Who Patrons Are and What They Want 30% of population are High Engagement YET ONLY 9% of the population are Print Traditionalists CONTRASTED WITH 80% who think books are important; 8% have used a library Ebook 4% Ebooks readers ONLY People under 65 LEAST likely to use the library 64% of users are interested in personalized reading recommendations 14% no personal library use only 4% aren’t interested at all Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  52. 52. Insight #3 How technology is changing flows of information Broadband+social networks+mobile technologies = “Networked Individualism” Society organized around individuals, not institutions crowdfunding pocket activism Libraries- exclusion is VERY problematic (digital divide) less need for “intermediaries.” Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  53. 53. Insight #4 Where new needs are surfacing in communities Market and Cultural Shortcomings ● Skills training in new literacies ● Preschool/ after school ● ESL ● Lifelong learning ● Credentialing ● Small business/ nonprofit support ● Community and civic information curators ● Agents of serendipitous discovery Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  54. 54. Insight #5 How the concept of library should change to meet new realities People: Serve and Learn ● Master teachers of tech ● Visionaries for the knowledge economy ● Content in context ● Curators of the “quality” information ● Models of lifelong learning Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  55. 55. Insight #5 How the concept of library should change to meet new realities Place: Reconfigured and Repurposed ● Different and Sensored space (interactives) ● Testbeds ● “Maker masters” ● Stewards of local information Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  56. 56. Insight #5 How the concept of library should change to meet new realities Platform: Community Resource ● Trusted- Privacy Watchdog ● Advocates for “free and open” ● Closing digital divide ● Entrepreneur enablers ● Civic specialists ● “Gap Fillers” (credentialing???) Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library
  57. 57. What Kenosha Hears 1. Keep buying lots of new books; weed the old and create learning spaces 2. Manage the message: workforce development and education 3. Automate returns more than checkout 4. Invest in Outreach (65+) 5. Incorporate Readers Advisory into checkout experience 6. Relax about eBooks Barbara Brattin, Director, Kenosha Public Library bbrattin@mykpl.info

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