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Welcome!
Grab a nametag and a seat.
We’ll get started shortly.
DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2
AgendaAgenda
9:00-9:30 Introductions and table topics
9:30-10:15 Service design thinking
Exercise #1: How Might We?
10:15-...
AgendaAgenda
11:30-12:30 Lunch
12:30-1:30 Define: From research insights to design solutions
Exercise #4: Solution brainst...
AgendaAgenda
3:20-3:35 Take it home and own it!
Exercise #7: How might we…
3:35-4:00 Recap and closing discussion
Exercise...
Today’s goal
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§ Introduce you to and have you “try-on”
design thinking in order to help you:
§...
Expectations for the day
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§ Favor process over outcomes. Experiencing the full process today w...
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Introduction
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What’s in a name
Library
Museum
Office
Repository
Vault
Treasury
Den
Archive
Menagerie
Workshop
Study
DE S I GN CONCE P TS...
Howdy!
Design Concepts
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Our offices
Main offices:
Madison, WI
San Francisco, CA
Satellite team members:
Minneapolis, MN
Princeton, NJ
Chicago, IL
...
We Design
Products
§ Crock-Pot Cooking
System
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We Design
Services
§ Hospitality, Financial &
Insurance
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We Create
Digital Experiences
§ First Alert Connected CO
Monitor
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We Create
Shopping
Experiences
§ Home Depot, Land’s End
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We Develop
Strategies
§ Spectrum Brands –
Rayovac Innovation
Strategy
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Our clients
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What we do
ENVISION REALIZE
In the broadest sense, we have the
people, experience and methods to
help our clients envision...
Deep immersion
Developing solutions that are
inspired by three important
perspectives to create value
for consumers
and bu...
Design thinking process
ABSTRACT
CONCRETE
DOINGUNDERSTANDING
PATTERNS DIRECTIONS
OBSERVATIONS SOLUTIONS
DE S I GN CONCE P ...
Design thinking process
ABSTRACT
CONCRETE
DOINGUNDERSTANDING
PATTERNS DIRECTIONS
OBSERVATIONS SOLUTIONS
Avoid…
DE S I GN C...
Enough about us…
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Let’s get started!!!
First task of the day: table topics
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§ Work with the team at your table for the
next ten min...
Select a table topic
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§ the elderly
§ students
§ local businesses
§ ______?
Option #1:
Creat...
Service Design Thinking
An overview
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What is service design?
§ The design of entire ecosystems v.
isolated problems—from digital to physical,
seen and unseen, ...
The 5 P’s of service design
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The 5 P’s of service design
People
CX Designers
Marketing
Human...
Service as theatre
§ The concept of actors on
both the front and back
stages are the foundation
of service design.
§ Each ...
Service as theatre
DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 0 AMERICAN PLAYERS THEATER
FRONTSTAGE
BACKSTAGE
SERVICE DESIGN: FROM INSIG...
The service design ecology
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A healthy service ecosystem is one in
which everyone benefits, r...
Key principles
#1 People focused
§ The service design
process always starts with
the customer needs, pain
points, motivati...
Key principles
#2 Research based
§ Building empathy for each
stakeholder group is a key
component of the process
§ Plannin...
Key principles
#3 Balanced
§ For a service solution to
be successful it needs to
bridge desirability (what
does the user w...
Key principles
#4 Starts with a solid core
§ MUST: Core services MUST
be there for the service to
remain viable
§ SHOULD: ...
Key principles
#5 Participatory
§ The complexities
associated with service
design require that various
stakeholder voices ...
Key principles
#6 Visual
§ Service design relies on
storytelling and
prototyping to create
alignment and foster
transparen...
Key principles
#7 Iterative
§ Design is a cyclical
process of building,
testing, analyzing, and
learning.
§ If we focus on...
Resource for
additional
information
Service Design: From
Insight to Implementation
By Andy Polaine and
live|work founders,...
Exercise #1: How Might We?
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WHY create How Might We questions?
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§ How Might We (HMW) questions reframe
problems as oppor...
Ex #1: HOW to generate HMW questions?
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Step #1: Generate Problem Statements
§ Time: 3 minute...
Ex #1: HOW to generate HMW questions?
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Step #2: Select a Problem Statement
§ Time: 10 minute...
Ex #1: HOW to generate HMW questions?
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Step #3: Generate HMW Questions
§ Time: 15 minutes
§ ...
Ex #1: HMW example
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POV: Working families have too many domestic after-school responsibiliti...
Fast Break! 5 minutes
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Discover: Contextual Inspiration
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This reminds me of….
What problem are you trying to solve, or
what activity do you want to support?
What is similar to thi...
For example
Family dinner
Look for inspiration on the
term family and dinner
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Exercise #2:
Lightning Inspiration
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Ex #2: Lightning Inspiration
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Step #1: Silent Generation
§ Time: 8 minutes
§ Format: Individ...
Ex #2: Lightning Inspiration
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Step #2: Team Share-out
§ Time: 12 minutes
§ Format: Individua...
Discover: Building Empathy
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The importance of building empathy
Phase 1
§ The start of a service
design project is a period
of discovery, gathering
ins...
Key principles of
service design
#1 People focused
§ The service design
process always starts with
the customer needs, pai...
Key principles of
service design
#2 Research based
§ Building empathy for each
stakeholder group is a key
component of the...
The importance of building empathy
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The core starting point of the service
design approach i...
Building empathy enables designers to…
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Understand the needs, behaviors, and
values of stake...
How do we build empathy?
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• Designers look to understand the needs
and desires of the people...
Defining the research question and objectives
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• Before undertaking any research, it is
impo...
Pair your methods to your inquiries
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Empathy building occurs at all stages of service
design...
Finding the right participants
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How do you find the right participants?
Before beginning any...
Developing protocols, guides and debriefs
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• Proper documentation is a necessary step in
dat...
The importance of a framework
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• Use a framework to analyze and codify
your results into a c...
Pains, Gains and Jobs to Be Done
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The framework of Pains, Gains and Jobs to
Be Done is espec...
Synthesize your findings
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Look holistically and deeply at the findings
and the broad pattern...
Exercise #3:
Empathy Building
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Exercise #3: Empathy Building
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Step #1: Jobs to Be Done
§ Time: 10 minutes
§ Format: Team
§ ...
Exercise #3: Empathy Building
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Step #2: Experience Map
§ Time: 20 minutes
§ Format: Team
§ T...
Exercise #3: Empathy Building
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Step #2: Experience Map
Lunch! 60 minutes
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Define
Bridging the gap from insights to actionable
solutions
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Design thinking process
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ABSTRACT
CONCRETE
DOINGUNDERSTANDING
PATTERNS DIRECTIONS
OBSERVATIO...
This is the tricky part
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Observations
Find a space to
externalize and visualize
all of your ...
This is the tricky part.
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Observations
Find a space to
externalize and visualize
all of your...
This is the tricky part.
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Observations
Find a space to
externalize and visualize
all of your...
This is the tricky part…
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Observations
Find a space to
externalize and visualize
all of your...
…but IMO it’s the
best part too!
§ Here’s our team sorting
observations that we listed
individually on cards
§ We’re begin...
Exercise #4:
Design Guidelines and Solution
Brainstorm
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Exercise #4: Design Guidelines
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Step #1: Musts, Coulds and Shoulds
§ Time: 10 minutes
§ Form...
Exercise #4: Design Guidelines
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Hint: Look to gaps, pain points or needs on your
experience ...
Exercise #4: Design Guidelines
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Step #2: Crazy Eights
§ Time: 5 minutes
§ Format: Individual...
Exercise #4: Design Guidelines
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Step #3: Solution Brainstorm
§ Time: 35 minutes (!?!)
§ Form...
Develop
The power of prototypes, pilots, and model
demonstrations
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Why prototype?
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§ The goal is to experience some aspects of
the service concept with custome...
What to prototype?
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LOW FIDELITY PROTOTYPE
§ Objectives: Help us test ideas quickly
and chea...
What to prototype?
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If it’s not logical or
possible to prototype
the full service
experience...
How to learn from your prototype?
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§ Build what you need The idea is to
develop the prototyp...
Exercise #5:
Prototyping the Service
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Exercise #5: Prototyping the Service
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Service Design Blueprint and/or Business Model Canvas
...
Prototyping the Service
Service Design Blueprint
§ A tool that helps clarify the
interactions between
customers, employees...
Prototyping the Service
Service Design Blueprint
How to use:
§ Begin with a journey map
of the customer
experience
§ Next ...
Prototyping the Service
Business Model Canvas
§ This tool helps teams
visualize how each
business aspect of the
service as...
Prototyping the Service
Business Model Canvas
How to use:
§ Begin with the long columns,
moving from right to left
§ Next,...
Deliver
Storytelling to build alignment
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What is storytelling in the context of design?
It is not…
§ a one-way street
§ passive
§ a bound final report
§ text-based...
Storytelling is…
continuous & evolving
§ The story should be
viewed as a conversation
overtime and not a one
time informat...
Storytelling is…
a design activity
§ Think about you
audience as your
customer—what are their
needs, pain points,
motivato...
Storytelling is…
a research activity
CONFIDENTIAL
Decision-MakingWorksheet
Ratetheopportunityareaaccordingtothefollowingcr...
Storytelling is…
visual & immersive
§ One of the most powerful
storytelling tools is to
make your audience feel
like they ...
Storytelling is…
opening up for critique
§ When giving critiques in
design, try to find the
nuggets of good that can
be bu...
Resource for
additional
information
Communicating the New
By Kim Erwin
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Exercise #6:
Tell your service story
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Exercise #6: Tell your service story
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Step #1: Prepare Your 2-minute Commercial
§ Time: 15...
Exercise #6: Tell your service story
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Step #2: Share it With the Group
§ Time: 35 minutes ...
Take it and Own it
Bringing today full-circle to bring value back
to your home library
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Service Design
Thinking is…
a repeatable
approach to
problem-solving
DISCOVER
INSIGHTS
DEFINE
PROBLEM
DEVELOP
SOLUTIONS
DE...
Recapping what we did today…
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1. Defined the Problem Statement(s) and
reframed into HMW op...
Recapping what we did today…
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5. Used our Experience Maps to build our
design guidelines i...
Exercise #7 (this is it people!)
How might YOU?
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Exercise #7: How might YOU?
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Step #1: Write Your Library’s Problem Statement
§ Time: 3 minut...
Exercise #7: How might YOU?
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Step #2: Generate HMW Questions
§ Time: 8 minutes
§ Format: In...
Exercise 7: HMW Example
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POV: Working families have too many domestic after-school responsi...
Exercise #8
I like, I wish, I wonder
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After school office
hours
§ Members of the Design
Concepts team will stick
around after the session to
answer any question...
Design Thinking for Library Innovation Workshop Slides
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Design Thinking for Library Innovation Workshop Slides

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Design Concepts, a product design and innovation consulting firm based in Madison, is pleased to partner with WiLS to present a Design Thinking for Library Innovation workshop at WiLS World 2016. Design Thinking is a creative approach to solving problems in a holistic and human-centered way. In this hands-on workshop, we will apply Design Thinking methods to address the challenges facing libraries. Participants will gain an understanding of a framework and process for innovation, and practice techniques including research, analysis, brainstorming, and storytelling to generate inspired solutions.

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Design Thinking for Library Innovation Workshop Slides

  1. 1. Welcome! Grab a nametag and a seat. We’ll get started shortly. DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2
  2. 2. AgendaAgenda 9:00-9:30 Introductions and table topics 9:30-10:15 Service design thinking Exercise #1: How Might We? 10:15-10:20 Fast break 10:20-10:45 Discover: Find inspiration Exercise #2: Lightning inspiration 10:45-11:30 Discover: Build empathy Exercise #3: Experience mapping DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3
  3. 3. AgendaAgenda 11:30-12:30 Lunch 12:30-1:30 Define: From research insights to design solutions Exercise #4: Solution brainstorm 1:30-1:40 Fast break 1:40-2:20 Develop: Prototyping Exercise #5: Service design blueprint 2:20-3:20 Deliver: Storytelling Exercise #6: 2-minute commercials DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4
  4. 4. AgendaAgenda 3:20-3:35 Take it home and own it! Exercise #7: How might we… 3:35-4:00 Recap and closing discussion Exercise #8: I like, I wish, I wonder 4:00-4:30 Post-workshop office hours (optional) DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5
  5. 5. Today’s goal DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 § Introduce you to and have you “try-on” design thinking in order to help you: § Frame what problem(s) you are trying to solve in your own communities § Innovate from the future and build a bridge from the “now” to the future § Equip you with stories, tools and templates that you can bring home to share with your colleagues and community.
  6. 6. Expectations for the day DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 § Favor process over outcomes. Experiencing the full process today with a flimsy idea is better than getting halfway through with a perfect idea. § Pull your own weight. Work together, no one is a spectator. § Pick up the markers. Document, document, document. Getting it on paper brings the idea to life. Everyone can draw stick figures, symbols, and diagrams. § Move fast. We have a lot to do, so don’t get stuck in the details. § Take breaks. Your table will keep you up to speed. § Live in the land of “What if?” Don’t worry about the constraints and realities of today. § Most importantly, have fun. Our day jobs are serious. Let’s not take today so seriously. Encourage wild ideas.
  7. 7. DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8
  8. 8. Introduction DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 9
  9. 9. What’s in a name Library Museum Office Repository Vault Treasury Den Archive Menagerie Workshop Study DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 Kitchen Nap room Dr’s office Maker space Baby sitter Counselor Tool cabinet Merchant Safe haven Craft room
  10. 10. Howdy! Design Concepts DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 11
  11. 11. Our offices Main offices: Madison, WI San Francisco, CA Satellite team members: Minneapolis, MN Princeton, NJ Chicago, IL DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 2
  12. 12. We Design Products § Crock-Pot Cooking System DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 3
  13. 13. We Design Services § Hospitality, Financial & Insurance DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 4
  14. 14. We Create Digital Experiences § First Alert Connected CO Monitor DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 5
  15. 15. We Create Shopping Experiences § Home Depot, Land’s End DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 6
  16. 16. We Develop Strategies § Spectrum Brands – Rayovac Innovation Strategy DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 7
  17. 17. Our clients DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 8
  18. 18. What we do ENVISION REALIZE In the broadest sense, we have the people, experience and methods to help our clients envision bold new future opportunities and the technical skill to bring those future visions to life. DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 9
  19. 19. Deep immersion Developing solutions that are inspired by three important perspectives to create value for consumers and businesses § Vision § OrganizationalStructure § Revenue Model § Competencies § Appetite for Risk THE WORLD PEOPLE & PLACESCLIENT § Context § Trends § Competition § Market Forces § Regulatory Environment § Size of Opportunity § Needs & Wants § Expectations § Attitudes § Motivations 2 0DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC.
  20. 20. Design thinking process ABSTRACT CONCRETE DOINGUNDERSTANDING PATTERNS DIRECTIONS OBSERVATIONS SOLUTIONS DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 1
  21. 21. Design thinking process ABSTRACT CONCRETE DOINGUNDERSTANDING PATTERNS DIRECTIONS OBSERVATIONS SOLUTIONS Avoid… DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 2
  22. 22. Enough about us… DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 3 Let’s get started!!!
  23. 23. First task of the day: table topics DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 4 § Work with the team at your table for the next ten minutes to choose the topic you want to address – we’ll present some options on the next slide. § When you are ready, write your table topic on one side of your foam core and place it in the middle of your table. § Look around the room. If there is a topic you’re more interested in, then move to that table.
  24. 24. Select a table topic DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 5 § the elderly § students § local businesses § ______? Option #1: Create a community gathering space for... Option #2: Overcome barriers to using the library for... § working parents § underserved communities § patrons connecting remotely § ______?
  25. 25. Service Design Thinking An overview DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 6
  26. 26. What is service design? § The design of entire ecosystems v. isolated problems—from digital to physical, seen and unseen, tangible to intangible § Uses design methods with a service mindset, focusing on creating lasting and meaningful value for the customer in a way that is sustainable for the business DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 7 FROM TO
  27. 27. The 5 P’s of service design DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 8 The 5 P’s of service design People CX Designers Marketing Human Resources Talent Management Props Industrial Designers Product Managers Information Architects Place Architectural Designers UX Designers Partnerships Supply Chain Development Processes Operations Project Managers Business Design Service design is not a new way of thinking. It’s about harnessing the design power across disciplines. People Employees and other customers encountered while the service is produced. These people are actors in the service experience. Props The objects and the collateral used to produce the service encounter (forms, products, signage). Place The physical space or the virtual environment through which the service is delivered. Partnership Other businesses or entities that help to produce or enhance the service encounter. Process Workflows and rituals that are used to produce the service encounter. The processes are the glue that connects the front and back stages.
  28. 28. Service as theatre § The concept of actors on both the front and back stages are the foundation of service design. § Each of the actors, as well as the audience, exchange some type of value. § Actors use props within the theater that can be physical or virtual DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 2 9 AMERICAN PLAYERS THEATER
  29. 29. Service as theatre DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 0 AMERICAN PLAYERS THEATER FRONTSTAGE BACKSTAGE SERVICE DESIGN: FROM INSIGHT TO IMPLEMENTATION. 2013. ROSENFELD MEDIA
  30. 30. The service design ecology DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 1 A healthy service ecosystem is one in which everyone benefits, rather than having the value flow in one direction only. The most common lost opportunity is when we neglect the resource that customers can be in terms of providing value back. SERVICE DESIGN: FROM INSIGHT TO IMPLEMENTATION. 2013. ROSENFELD MEDIA
  31. 31. Key principles #1 People focused § The service design process always starts with the customer needs, pain points, motivations, and opportunities § From there, the focus extends to other stakeholders, or actors, in the service experience— from the person behind the counter to the person delivering the mail DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 2 MADISON PUBLIC LIBRARY
  32. 32. Key principles #2 Research based § Building empathy for each stakeholder group is a key component of the process § Planning a thoughtful approach to understanding each user group is a critical part of any design thinking process § Get out of the building. Breakthrough ideas happen when you get outside of your normal routine and headspace DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 3
  33. 33. Key principles #3 Balanced § For a service solution to be successful it needs to bridge desirability (what does the user want?), feasibility (can we provide it?) and viability (does this make business sense?) § If you just focus on desirability and not viability, the service will fail DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 4 DESIRABILITY FEASIBILITY VIABILITY
  34. 34. Key principles #4 Starts with a solid core § MUST: Core services MUST be there for the service to remain viable § SHOULD: Performing services go one step further to create a seamless and reliable experience for customers § COULD: Delighting services afford customers with moments of delight, driving desirability, value, and growth DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 5 Core Performing Delighting
  35. 35. Key principles #5 Participatory § The complexities associated with service design require that various stakeholder voices have a place at the table DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 6
  36. 36. Key principles #6 Visual § Service design relies on storytelling and prototyping to create alignment and foster transparency § An attention to visual storytelling helps make complex holistic services more understandable, and builds alignment throughout the process DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 7
  37. 37. Key principles #7 Iterative § Design is a cyclical process of building, testing, analyzing, and learning. § If we focus on process rather than the end result, we may stumble upon unexpected results DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 8 DISCOVER INSIGHTS DEFINE PROBLEM DEVELOP SOLUTIONS DELIVER VALIDATION iterate iterate PHASE1 PHASE 2 PHASE 3 PHASE 4 DESIGN CONCEPTS’ PHASED PROCESS DIAGRAM
  38. 38. Resource for additional information Service Design: From Insight to Implementation By Andy Polaine and live|work founders, Ben Reason and Lavrans Løvlie. DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 3 9
  39. 39. Exercise #1: How Might We? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 0
  40. 40. WHY create How Might We questions? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 1 § How Might We (HMW) questions reframe problems as opportunities § HMWs help us look at a problem from multiple angles § HMWs provide the hook for research and brainstorming activities to come
  41. 41. Ex #1: HOW to generate HMW questions? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 2 Step #1: Generate Problem Statements § Time: 3 minutes § Format: Individual § Task: List all of the problem statements you can think of related to your table topic on post-it notes. Take your table topic challenge and drill into the specifics of the problem. Try to put it in terms of an (imagined) person. Example § Challenge: Overcome the barriers to using the library for working families § POV: The Smith family is rushed to get dinner on the table in the evenings, when they would like to spend quality time together. The Andrews’aren’t able to attend programs that are scheduled during the work day. The Williams’ have varying intellectual demands of multiple children.
  42. 42. Ex #1: HOW to generate HMW questions? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 3 Step #2: Select a Problem Statement § Time: 10 minutes § Format: Team § Task: As a team, share your problem statements and sort them into clusters of similar ideas or problems. Select one cluster of problem statements that you would like your team to focus on for the remainder of the day. Example § Challenge: Overcome the barriers to using the library for working families § The team sorts all of the POV statements and selects a cluster that describes “Working families have too many domestic after-school responsibilities to enjoy the library with their kids.”
  43. 43. Ex #1: HOW to generate HMW questions? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 4 Step #3: Generate HMW Questions § Time: 15 minutes § Format: Team § Task: Using the HMW worksheet, generate a list of questions. Once you complete the worksheet, select one of the questions for your team to focus on in the upcoming research and brainstorming exercises.
  44. 44. Ex #1: HMW example DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 5 POV: Working families have too many domestic after-school responsibilities to enjoy the library. Amp up the good: HMW create more quality time for families afterschool? Remove the bad: HMW eliminate domestic responsibilities afterschool? Explore the opposite: HMW make chores the most exciting part of the day? Question an assumption: HMW help working parents make the case for more flexible work schedules? Go after adjectives: HMW make afterschool chores exciting and shared instead of routine and individual? ID unexpected resources: HMW put other programs (during the day or for the retired) to work to support the workload of working mothers? Create an analogy from need or context: HMW make limited afterschool hours feel like a family reunion? Play POV against the challenge: HMW make kids want to help with afterschool chores? Change the status quo: HMW make working parents feel less time-strapped? Break POV into pieces: HMW make afterschool programs fun for kids? HMW give mom more free time?
  45. 45. Fast Break! 5 minutes DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 6
  46. 46. Discover: Contextual Inspiration DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 7
  47. 47. This reminds me of…. What problem are you trying to solve, or what activity do you want to support? What is similar to this out in the world? Document what they do, do well and/or are missing. What inspires you? How does this make you look at your problem statement or solutions different? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 8
  48. 48. For example Family dinner Look for inspiration on the term family and dinner DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 4 9
  49. 49. Exercise #2: Lightning Inspiration DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 0
  50. 50. Ex #2: Lightning Inspiration DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 1 Step #1: Silent Generation § Time: 8 minutes § Format: Individual § Task: What companies, products, or services in the world do a good job of responding to your opportunity? List your ideas on post-its. You may use your brain, computer, or tablet for this exercise. The goal is to generate 3-10 companies, products, or services outside of the library experience. Example § For example: Blue Apron delivers groceries and meals to reduce time spent shopping and meal planning; Chores Hero app helps organize and distribute chores; Fit-to-Go meal service at Harbor Athletic Club combines 2 to-dos of exercise and dinner; Hop Skip Drive ridesharing service for kids; the school lunch program, etc.
  51. 51. Ex #2: Lightning Inspiration DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 2 Step #2: Team Share-out § Time: 12 minutes § Format: Individual § Task: Rapid-fire share-out your top 3-5 ideas with your team. Find a space on the wall to post your Lightning inspiration, for when you need to reference it later.
  52. 52. Discover: Building Empathy DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 3
  53. 53. The importance of building empathy Phase 1 § The start of a service design project is a period of discovery, gathering inspiration and insights, identifying user needs, and developing initial ideas DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 4 DISCOVER INSIGHTS DEFINE PROBLEM DEVELOP SOLUTIONS DELIVER VALIDATION iterate iterate PHASE1 PHASE 2 PHASE 3 PHASE 4 DESIGN CONCEPTS’ PHASED PROCESS DIAGRAM
  54. 54. Key principles of service design #1 People focused § The service design process always starts with the customer needs, pain points, motivations, and opportunities § From there, the focus extends to other stakeholders, or actors, in the service experience— from the person behind the counter to the person delivering the mail DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 5 MADISON PUBLIC LIBRARY
  55. 55. Key principles of service design #2 Research based § Building empathy for each stakeholder group is a key component of the process § Planning a thoughtful approach to understanding each user group is a critical part of any design thinking process § Get out of the building. Breakthrough ideas happen when you get outside of your normal routine and headspace DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 6
  56. 56. The importance of building empathy DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 7 The core starting point of the service design approach is to be human focused. • Building empathy for each stakeholder group is a key component of the service design process So…. • You must put stakeholders at the center of the process if you want to design successful and popular services
  57. 57. Building empathy enables designers to… DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 8 Understand the needs, behaviors, and values of stakeholders Reveal opportunities that match user needs to company goals Develop more compelling offerings for your customers Evaluate service concepts or directions Ensure ideas being developed are desirable
  58. 58. How do we build empathy? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 5 9 • Designers look to understand the needs and desires of the people who will use a product or service by spending time with them • Building empathy allows for a deeper understanding of how your service is perceived, used, and experienced
  59. 59. Defining the research question and objectives DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 0 • Before undertaking any research, it is important to define your goals/learning outcomes • Start broad in an opportunity space, then narrow down to a specific hypothesis you want to investigate, validate, or refute in relation to the overall project objective • Be sure to define the problem, not the solution
  60. 60. Pair your methods to your inquiries DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 1 Empathy building occurs at all stages of service design. These are two examples of empathy building research activities in discovery research: User Shadowing/Observation Observation is the most fundamental way to gather primary information and is a key tool for design research. Simply put, it means going out into the world with open eyes and mind to develop an understanding and empathy about other people’s experiences. Contextual Inquiry/Interviewing Contextual inquiry allows for the exploration of specific behaviors, attitudes, motivations, and beliefs through a moderated interview.
  61. 61. Finding the right participants DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 2 How do you find the right participants? Before beginning any empathy building research it is important to find the right participants. The first step is to clearly articulate what kind of person you are looking for. To do this you can create a participant profile. This profile should be just enough detail to help guide in the identification process of interview candidates. Ex: staff member who has deep knowledge in a service, has decision-making authority and represents a segment of use cases
  62. 62. Developing protocols, guides and debriefs DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 3 • Proper documentation is a necessary step in data collection and should be developed before performing research • Guides and protocols ensure data are collected in a consistent matter and with the research aims in mind • Guides and protocols should be specific (ex: listing questions to be asked, approximate time to spend on categories of questions, etc.) but also be open to change depending on the interviewee’s responses • Be sure to include the learning outcomes/goals of research on your guides to reference • If you want to ensure you capture all data – and you do – debrief as soon as possible after each interview/observation
  63. 63. The importance of a framework DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 4 • Use a framework to analyze and codify your results into a consumable format. Make sure your framework is geared towards answering your hypotheses. • Use framework to drive data to actionable insights Ex: 5 P’s of Service Design People, Props, Place, Partnerships, Process,
  64. 64. Pains, Gains and Jobs to Be Done DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 5 The framework of Pains, Gains and Jobs to Be Done is especially useful when determining values Pains: What are people’s primary pain points? Gains: What are people in love with? Jobs: What they trying to accomplish?
  65. 65. Synthesize your findings DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 6 Look holistically and deeply at the findings and the broad patterns you see across the data to interpret findings into meaningful insights Ex: • Summarize top pain points, benefit, and service perceptions • Frame key insights that might impact service strategy • Recommend next steps for continued research, specific service improvements, and service strategy
  66. 66. Exercise #3: Empathy Building DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 7
  67. 67. Exercise #3: Empathy Building DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 8 Step #1: Jobs to Be Done § Time: 10 minutes § Format: Team § Task: Quickly generate a list of key stakeholders that might be involved in your opportunity. Think broad—anything from the central actor to the costume designer, to use the theater analogy. Complete a Jobs to Be Done worksheet for each of the key stakeholders. Example § For example: Working parents, children, school teachers
  68. 68. Exercise #3: Empathy Building DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 6 9 Step #2: Experience Map § Time: 20 minutes § Format: Team § Task: Now that we’ve thought about the individual Jobs to Be Done for each of your key stakeholders, it’s time to understand how their experience today stitches together (if at all!) Select one key stakeholder and build an Experience Map of their experience as it exists today, using the worksheet on your table. Don’t be afraid to get out of the library and into the stakeholder’s head.
  69. 69. Exercise #3: Empathy Building DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 0 Step #2: Experience Map
  70. 70. Lunch! 60 minutes DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 1
  71. 71. Define Bridging the gap from insights to actionable solutions DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 2
  72. 72. Design thinking process DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 3 ABSTRACT CONCRETE DOINGUNDERSTANDING PATTERNS DIRECTIONS OBSERVATIONS SOLUTIONS
  73. 73. This is the tricky part DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 4 Observations Find a space to externalize and visualize all of your observations from the discovery phase. -User Research -Contextual Research -Company/Institutional Research
  74. 74. This is the tricky part. DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 5 Observations Find a space to externalize and visualize all of your observations from the discovery phase. -User Research -Contextual Research -Company/Institutional Research Patterns/Frameworks Next, it’s time to apply structure to identify gaps, uncover patterns, discover insights. -Personas -Jobs to be Done -Experience Maps WHAT?
  75. 75. This is the tricky part. DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 6 Observations Find a space to externalize and visualize all of your observations from the discovery phase. -User Research -Contextual Research -Company/Institutional Research Patterns/Frameworks Next, it’s time to apply structure to identify gaps, uncover patterns, discover insights. -Personas -Jobs to be Done -Experience Maps Directions / Imperatives Imperatives are solution strategies or solution areas that tell us what the design needs to do, and how it should do it. -Musts, coulds, and shoulds -Design Principles / Drivers WHAT? SO WHAT?
  76. 76. This is the tricky part… DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 7 Observations Find a space to externalize and visualize all of your observations from the discovery phase. -User Research -Contextual Research -Company/Institutional Research Patterns/Frameworks Next, it’s time to apply structure to identify gaps, uncover patterns, and discover insights. -Personas -Jobs to be Done -Experience Maps Directions / Imperatives Imperatives are solution strategies or solution areas that tell us what the design needs to do and how it should do it. -Musts, coulds, and shoulds -Design Principles / Drivers WHAT? SO WHAT? GET REAL. Solutions Solutions turn thinking into reality. -Prototypes -Service Blueprints -Business Model Canvas -Concept sketches
  77. 77. …but IMO it’s the best part too! § Here’s our team sorting observations that we listed individually on cards § We’re beginning to find patterns and sort them into a larger framework DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 8
  78. 78. Exercise #4: Design Guidelines and Solution Brainstorm DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 7 9
  79. 79. Exercise #4: Design Guidelines DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 0 Step #1: Musts, Coulds and Shoulds § Time: 10 minutes § Format: Team § Task: Generate a list of musts, coulds, and shoulds for a service solution using a blank flip chart and any observations from the Lightning Inspiration and Experience Maps. For example: HMW: make afterschool chores exciting and shared, instead of routine and individual? Musts: § alleviate the burden of afterschool chores Coulds: § could allow for patrons to spend more time with people in their community § eliminate the burden of any of the the following: after-schoolpick-up, grocery shopping, meal planning and prep, laundry, clean-up, and homework Shoulds: § allow families to spend more time together § teach something
  80. 80. Exercise #4: Design Guidelines DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 1 Hint: Look to gaps, pain points or needs on your experience map to define what a new service must/could/should do for your user.
  81. 81. Exercise #4: Design Guidelines DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 2 Step #2: Crazy Eights § Time: 5 minutes § Format: Individual § Task: Every person at your table needs 8 half-sheets of paper. Using your experience map and what you know about your stakeholders and the design criteria, generate 8 ideas for solving the problem with a service. You will have 5 minutes to draw 8 service solution ideas on your half-sheets. That’s 1 idea every 40 seconds…it’s crazy, but it’s a great way to crank out variations of ideas quickly, and turn off the perfectionism and self-editing.
  82. 82. Exercise #4: Design Guidelines DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 3 Step #3: Solution Brainstorm § Time: 35 minutes (!?!) § Format: Individual § Task: Be honest, you’ve been waiting for this all day. Share-out your ideas around the table and decide on the one idea that best responds to the opportunity. Maybe you take a little of this and that and build on each other’s ideas. Maybe you want to break into 2 teams to explore 2 separate ideas for the remainder of the day. Don’t worry if it’s not perfect—we’re moving fast! For example: The library offers group cooking classes for families every Thursday evening where both kids and adults can learn together and eat what they cook—without dirtying their own kitchen.
  83. 83. Develop The power of prototypes, pilots, and model demonstrations DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 4
  84. 84. Why prototype? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 5 § The goal is to experience some aspects of the service concept with customers or other stakeholders in order to improve the solutions before more resources are invested for the service to be realized § Save money, time, and resources § Prototyping as a research activity
  85. 85. What to prototype? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 6 LOW FIDELITY PROTOTYPE § Objectives: Help us test ideas quickly and cheaply. It should look and feel like a work in progress. § Examples: Paper prototypes, role- playing, hand-sketched screen mock- ups, cognitive walk-throughs (wearing the hats of different stakeholder profiles), 2 minute commercials, service design blueprints, business model canvases, etc... HIGH FIDELITY PROTOTYPE § Objectives: Helps us refine and polish idea with user feedback. It should look and feel real. § Examples: Clickable interfaces of technological infrastructure, web pages, videos, 3D printed products or packaging, etc…
  86. 86. What to prototype? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 7 If it’s not logical or possible to prototype the full service experience, start with the highest risk assumptions. KNOWN MORE CRITICALLESS CRITICAL Highest risk Assumptions UNKNOWN
  87. 87. How to learn from your prototype? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 8 § Build what you need The idea is to develop the prototype only to the level of fidelity that is needed to test the service idea and learn what you need to know § Measure Decide in advance of the research the metrics by which you will measure success (clicks, surveys, reactions, etc.) § Context Ideally, a service prototype is put in front of the user in the place, situation, and condition where the service will actually exist A ‘WIZARD OF OZ’ PROTOTYPE
  88. 88. Exercise #5: Prototyping the Service DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 8 9
  89. 89. Exercise #5: Prototyping the Service DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 9 0 Service Design Blueprint and/or Business Model Canvas § Time: 30 minutes § Format: Team § Task: Use the next 30 minutes to dive into the details of your service. You may use the Service Design Blueprint or Business Model Canvas worksheets. Feel free to use the worksheets as a guide and instead use post-its and whiteboard space to map it out on the wall.
  90. 90. Prototyping the Service Service Design Blueprint § A tool that helps clarify the interactions between customers, employees, and digital touchpoints § Helps your team think about the frontstage activities that will impact the customer directly as well as the the backstage activities that the customer does not see but are critical to the success of your service innovation DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 9 1
  91. 91. Prototyping the Service Service Design Blueprint How to use: § Begin with a journey map of the customer experience § Next fill-in the front stage touchpoints, including the physical evidence (or stuff), service employees (people), and digital & devices (digital touchpoints) § Finally, think about the backstage people, activities, and processes DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 9 2
  92. 92. Prototyping the Service Business Model Canvas § This tool helps teams visualize how each business aspect of the service aspect will come into place § Even though we might not typically think of library services as a business, this tool helps us think of innovative ways to reach people (channels) or develop key partnerships that can share the load DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 9 3
  93. 93. Prototyping the Service Business Model Canvas How to use: § Begin with the long columns, moving from right to left § Next, go into the squares to detail out the channels, resources, and activities needed to make the service happen § Finish with thinking about the potential cost and revenue streams. § If you’re unsure or have options, it’s okay! List it and move on. DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 9 4
  94. 94. Deliver Storytelling to build alignment DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 9 5
  95. 95. What is storytelling in the context of design? It is not… § a one-way street § passive § a bound final report § text-based § a single presentation or meeting
  96. 96. Storytelling is… continuous & evolving § The story should be viewed as a conversation overtime and not a one time information transfer § Organize regular touch points so that everyone feels like they’re building the story together over the course of the project DISCOVER INSIGHTS DEFINE PROBLEM DEVELOP SOLUTIONS DELIVER VALIDATION iterate iterate PHASE1 PHASE 2 PHASE 3 PHASE 4Launch project Immersein theresearch Selectan opportunity area Adviseon solution Refinebased onpilot insights
  97. 97. Storytelling is… a design activity § Think about you audience as your customer—what are their needs, pain points, motivators, and hopes for the project? § Design your space— rearrange tables and chairs, hang posters, find natural light, provide writing, drawing, and building materials. Attention to these details will signal that something is “different” from your typical meeting
  98. 98. Storytelling is… a research activity CONFIDENTIAL Decision-MakingWorksheet Ratetheopportunityareaaccordingtothefollowingcriteria,whereahigherscore(5) ismorepositivethanalowerscore(1). Q u i c k s i l v e r : C o - S y n t h e s i s O P P O R T U N I T Y A R E A : N A M E : ValueProp:CoreLabLeaders ValueProp:LabTechs ValueProp:Clinicians ValueProp:PatientOutcomes BehavioralChange UNCLEAR CLEAR UNCLEAR CLEAR People:UserNeeds UNCLEAR CLEAR UNCLEAR CLEAR HI LOW CompetitiveWhitespace AlignswithTrends:Healthcare AlignswithTrends:Technology CROWDED OPEN NO YES Context:TrendsandCompetitors NO YES ValueProp:InternalStakeholders AlignswithBrandPosition:ChooseTransformation AlignswithQ Complexity:Build Complexity:Sell UNCLEAR CLEAR NO YES Company:ADDVision NO YES HI LOW HI LOW 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 § Like prototyping, storytelling should be viewed as a research activity. Use it as an opportunity to get feedback and improve § One example is to use feedback worksheets with ‘sliders’ based on project goals that were pre-determined in the project kick-off meeting CONFIDENTIAL Ilike... Iwish... Iwonder.... Notes... T I T L E O F A C T I V I T Y Q u i c k s i l v e r : C o - S y n t h e s i s O P P O R T U N I T Y A R E A : N A M E : Ilike... Iwish... Iwonder.... Notes... Q u i c k s i l v e r : C o - S y n t h e s i s O P P O R T U N I T Y A R E A : N A M E : G U T C H E C K G U T C H E C K1 1 CONFIDENTIAL
  99. 99. Storytelling is… visual & immersive § One of the most powerful storytelling tools is to make your audience feel like they were a part of the research process § Using tools like video clips, quotes, posters, and installations helps the audience feel closer to the process and better understand the solution § Have audience members act out the service experience IMAGE COURTESY OF ROSENFELD MEDIA
  100. 100. Storytelling is… opening up for critique § When giving critiques in design, try to find the nuggets of good that can be built upon, and use that to balance the negative. Explain why and be specific so you can build on the good ideas § When receiving a critique, it’s best to remain open and not get defensive, giving additional details only when necessary
  101. 101. Resource for additional information Communicating the New By Kim Erwin DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 2
  102. 102. Exercise #6: Tell your service story DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 3
  103. 103. Exercise #6: Tell your service story DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 4 Step #1: Prepare Your 2-minute Commercial § Time: 15 minutes § Format: Team § Task: Using the sketches, storyboards, flip charts, and post-its you’ve generated today, outline a less than 2-minute story about your concept. You are encouraged to act it out. Work fast because next we will be sharing our stories with the larger group!
  104. 104. Exercise #6: Tell your service story DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 5 Step #2: Share it With the Group § Time: 35 minutes (6 teams x 5 minutes per team) § Format: Team § Task: Each team will have 2 minutes to share their commercial and then receive 3 minutes of feedback from the group
  105. 105. Take it and Own it Bringing today full-circle to bring value back to your home library DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 6
  106. 106. Service Design Thinking is… a repeatable approach to problem-solving DISCOVER INSIGHTS DEFINE PROBLEM DEVELOP SOLUTIONS DELIVER VALIDATION iterate iterate PHASE1 PHASE 2 PHASE 3 PHASE 4Launch project Immersein theresearch Selectan opportunity area Adviseon solution Refinebased onpilot insights
  107. 107. Recapping what we did today… DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 8 1. Defined the Problem Statement(s) and reframed into HMW opportunities 2. Selected a HMW opportunity to focus our efforts and conduct contextual research for inspiration 3. Built empathy and generated Jobs to be Done and Experience Maps to highlight user needs and pain points
  108. 108. Recapping what we did today… DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 1 0 9 5. Used our Experience Maps to build our design guidelines in the form of musts/coulds/shoulds 6. Conducted a solution brainstorm and selected one solution to build a prototype in the form of a Service Design Blueprint or Business Model Canvas 7. Created a 2-minute commercial and gathered feedback from the group
  109. 109. Exercise #7 (this is it people!) How might YOU? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 11 0
  110. 110. Exercise #7: How might YOU? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 111 Step #1: Write Your Library’s Problem Statement § Time: 3 minutes heads-down / 2 minutes shout-out § Format: Individual § Task: We recognize that each of you have pressing challenges and opportunities in your own local libraries. We’re giving you some time to get started on one of these challenges today. Create a list of your library’s most pressing problem statements that you might like to tackle with a Service Design Thinking approach. After you’re finished we’ll go around the room and shout-out the problem statements we’re hoping to tackle. Keep an ear out for others with similar challenges and make friends J
  111. 111. Exercise #7: How might YOU? DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 11 2 Step #2: Generate HMW Questions § Time: 8 minutes § Format: Individual § Task: Using the HMW exercise that we kicked-off the day with, transform your problem statement into a list of HMW questions as a starting point for opportunity and inspiration.
  112. 112. Exercise 7: HMW Example DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 11 3 POV: Working families have too many domestic after-school responsibilities to enjoy the library. Amp up the good: HMW create more quality time for families afterschool? Remove the bad: HMW eliminate domestic responsibilities afterschool? Explore the opposite: HMW make chores the most exciting part of the day? Question an assumption: HMW help working parents make the case for more flexible work schedules? Go after adjectives: HMW make afterschool chores exciting and shared, instead of routine and individual? ID unexpected resources: HMW put other programs (during the day or for the retired) to work to support the workload of working mothers? Create an analogy from need or context: HMW make limited afterschool hours feel like a family reunion? Play POV against the challenge: HMW make kids want to help with afterschool chores? Change the status quo: HMW make working parents feel less time-strapped? Break POV into pieces: HMW make afterschool programs fun for kids? HMW give mom more free time?
  113. 113. Exercise #8 I like, I wish, I wonder DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 11 4
  114. 114. After school office hours § Members of the Design Concepts team will stick around after the session to answer any questions and even help with planning an approach to user research if you have a specific question in mind DE S I GN CONCE P TS, INC. 11 5

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