American renaissance

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American renaissance

  1. 1. 1830s to the end of the Civil War American literature influenced by European literature Transcendentalism. It is located inside of the period of the Romanticism.
  2. 2. Birth of the American Renaissance It is generally acknowledged that the American Renaissance encompassed several decades, early in American history, up to and just beyond the time of the Civil War. In order to fully appreciate and comprehend the importance of the American Renaissance, as well as to establish the legitimacy of its existence.
  3. 3. Characteristics.  Individualism: Struggle of the frontier, Jacksonian Democracy, abolition.  Emotion: Subjectivity of truth & reality, intuition truth, perception derives from feelings not reason.  Imagination: Reaction against reason (neoclassicists), experimentation over tradition, structure of ideas. Nature: God is revealed in nature, is the only way to determine truth, and is the moral teacher.
  4. 4. Transcendentalism Was a religious and philosophical movement that was developed during the late 1820s and 1830s. In the eastern region of the united states as a protest to the general state of culture and society, and in particular, the state of intellectualism at Harvard university and the doctrine of the Unitarian church taught at Harvard divinity school. Among the transcendentalists' core beliefs was the inherent goodness of both people and nature.
  5. 5. Jacksonian democracy  Is the political movement toward greater democracy for the common white man symbolized by American politician Andrew Jackson and his supporters
  6. 6. Dark romanticism  Often conflated with Gothicism or called American Romanticism.
  7. 7. Writters Nathaniel Hawthorne Herman Melville Edgar Allan Poe Ralph Waldo Emerson Henry David Thoreau
  8. 8. Nathaniel Hawthorne  July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864  Was an American novelist and short story writer.  His fiction works are considered part of the Romantic movement and, more specifically, Dark romanticism.
  9. 9. Novels  Fanshawe (published anonymously, 1828)  The Scarlet Letter (1850)  The House of the Seven Gables (1851)  The Blithedale Romance (1852)  The Marble Faun: Or, The Romance of Monte Beni (1860) (as Transformation: Or, The Romance of Monte Beni, UK publication, same year)  The Dolliver Romance (1863) (unfinished)  Septimus Felton; or, the Elixir of Life (Published in the Atlantic Monthly, 1872)  Doctor Grimshawe's Secret: A romance (unfinished), with Preface and Notes by Julian Hawthorne (1882)
  10. 10. Short stories  Twice-Told Tales (1837)  Grandfather's Chair (1840)  Mosses from an Old Manse (1846)  The Snow-Image, and Other Twice-Told Tales (1852)  A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys (1852)  Tanglewood Tales (1853)  The Dolliver Romance and Other Pieces (1876)  The Great Stone Face and Other Tales of the White Mountains (1889)  The Celestial Railroad and Other Short Stories  A Wonder-Book for Young and Old (1851) Publisher: The Rogers Company
  11. 11. Henry David Thoreau  July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862  Was an american author, poet, philosopher, abolitioni st, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, and leading transcendentalist.
  12. 12. One of his most famous books
  13. 13. Works Aulus Persius Flaccus (1840)  The Service (1840)  A Walk to Wachusett (1842)  Paradise (to be) Regained (1843)  The Landlord (1843)  Sir Walter Raleigh (1844)  Herald of Freedom (1844)  Wendell Phillips Before the Concord Lyceum (1845)  Reform and the Reformers (1846–48)  Thomas Carlyle and His Works(1847)  A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849)  Resistance to Civil Government, or Civil Disobedience (1849)  An Excursion to Canada (1853)  Slavery in Massachusetts (1854)  Walden (1854)
  14. 14. Ralph Waldo Emerson  May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882  Was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century.
  15. 15. Works  Essays: First Series (1841)  Essays: Second Series (1844)  Poems (1847)  Nature; Addresses and Lectures (1849)  Representative Men (1850)  English Traits (1856)  The Conduct of Life (1860)  May Day and Other Poems (1867)  Society and Solitude (1870)  Letters and Social Aims (1876)
  16. 16. Individual essays  "Nature" (1836)  "Self-Reliance" (Essays: First Series)  "Compensation" (First Series)  "The Over-Soul" (First Series)  "Circles" (First Series)  "The Poet" (Essays: Second Series)  "Experience" (Essays: Second Series)  "Politics" (Second Series)  "The American Scholar"  "New England Reformers"
  17. 17. Poems  "Concord Hymn"  "The Rhodora"  "Brahma"  "Uriel"  "The Snow-Storm (poem)"
  18. 18. Edgar Allan Poe  January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849  Was an american author, poet, editor, and literary critic, considered part of the american romantic movement.
  19. 19. Works  "The Black Cat"  "The Cask of Amontillado"  "A Descent into the Maelström"  "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar"  "The Fall of the House of Usher"  "The Gold-Bug"  "Hop-Frog"  "The Imp of the Perverse"  "Ligeia"  "The Masque of the Red Death"  "Morella"  "The Murders in the Rue Morgue"  "The Oval Portrait"  "The Pit and the Pendulum"  "The Premature Burial"  "The Purloined Letter"  "The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether"  "The Tell-Tale Heart" Tales
  20. 20. Poetry  "Al Aaraaf"  "Annabel Lee"  "The Bells"  "The City in the Sea"  "The Conqueror Worm"  "A Dream Within a Dream"  "Eldorado"  "Eulalie"  "The Haunted Palace"  "To Helen"  "Lenore"  "Tamerlane"  "The Raven"  "Ulalume"
  21. 21. Herman Melville  August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891.  Was an American writer best known for the novel Moby- Dick.
  22. 22. Works Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life (1846)  Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas (1847)  Mardi: And a Voyage Thither (1849)  Redburn: His First Voyage (1849)  White-Jacket; or, The World in a Man-of-War (1850)  Moby-Dick; or, The Whale (1851)  Pierre: or, The Ambiguities (1852)  Isle of the Cross (1853 unpublished, and now lost)  "Bartleby the Scrivener" (1853) (short story)  The Encantadas, or Enchanted Isles (1854) (novella, possibly incorporating a short rewrite of the lost Isle of the Cross)  "Benito Cereno" (1855)  Israel Potter: His Fifty Years of Exile (1855)  The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade (1857)  Battle Pieces and Aspects of the War (1866) (poetry collection)  Clarel: A Poem and Pilgrimage in the Holy Land (1876) (epic poem)  John Marr and Other Sailors (1888) (poetry collection)  Timoleon (1891) (poetry collection)  Billy Budd, Sailor (An Inside Narrative) (1891 unfinished, published posthumously in 1924; authoritative edition in 1962)
  23. 23. Nathaniel Hawthorne "Happiness is like a butterfly which, when pursued, is always beyond our grasp, but which, if you sit down quietly, may alight on you." Henry David Thoreau "Nobody knows what they have until you lose it".
  24. 24. Ralph Waldo Emerson "The fate of genius is to be misunderstood, but not every misunderstood is a genius." "No one knows what is the consolation of the heart but when we were alone." Edgar Allan Poe
  25. 25. Herman Melville  It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.

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