The paradox of the inspiring classroom

309 views

Published on

Handout for the workshop at the 21st ELT conference. Cali, Colombia

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The paradox of the inspiring classroom

  1. 1. The paradox of the inspiring classroom CCCA 21st Annual ELT – May 9-10, 2014 The paradox of the inspiring classroom By adopting or adapting some of the following characteristics in our classrooms we could help our students to be more “inspired” and find ways of making the most of their learning abilities. In an inspiring classroom . . . . . . students are involved in more than passive learning. Make sure your students are given the chance to use their English in class and explore the different things they can do through language. Manage your teacher talk and plan activities in which students get to use the language for communicative purposes. In an inspiring classroom . . . . . . students are involved in higher order thinking (analysis, synthesis, evaluation, etc). Propose activities and goals which allow your students to use their abilities and critical thinking skills so they understand language as a means to an end. In an inspiring classroom . . . . . . there is no room for embarrassment. If you want to inspire your students they must feel free to make mistakes, ask for clarification and help. They have to
  2. 2. The paradox of the inspiring classroom CCCA 21st Annual ELT – May 9-10, 2014 understand the language classroom is a place to collaborate and learn from each other. In an inspiring classroom . . . . . . students work in groups. Try different group settings. Have your students work in pairs, small groups and as a whole group too. Sharing ideas, comparing, evaluating and concluding with the help of others builds up a great sense of belonging and it is inspiring! In an inspiring classroom . . . . . . students are given choices as much as possible. Don’t be afraid. It doesn’t mean you are going to do everything your students want. While choosing a topic for a presentation, doing a project, assigning homework, and more you can ask your students to give ideas or select from a group of choices what they like the most. In an inspiring classroom . . . . . . there is room for improvisation. From time to time inspiration is something that comes to you out of the blue. Be always attentive to those “magic moments” and do not hesitate to change your plan and take advantage one of these incredible opportunities with your students.
  3. 3. The paradox of the inspiring classroom CCCA 21st Annual ELT – May 9-10, 2014

×