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Cyberhate Workshop: Don't Feed the Trolls by Amy Binns

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Cyberhate Workshop: Don't Feed the Trolls by Amy Binns

  1. 1. Amy Binns University of Central Lancashire Cyber Hate and Bullying Conference Don’t Feed the Trolls: Challenges and responses of online behaviour
  2. 2. Research Background  Don’t Feed the Trolls!  Managing difficult behaviour on magazines’ websites  Facebook’s Ugly Sisters  Abuse and Anonymity on Ask.fm and Formspring  Twitter City and Facebook Village  Teenage girls’ personas and experiences influenced by choice architecture in social networking sites  Fair Game?  Journalists’ experiences of online abuse
  3. 3. Some common threads....  Anonymity is always an issue  Deindividuation reduces responsibility  Virtual vs reality  Easy to treat as a game  Not all sites are the same  Look at happy places for best practice  Design out abuse triggers
  4. 4. A word about Ask.fm  Allows importing of offline contacts through Facebook friends etc.  Allows anonymous questioning of offline friends.  The evil twist  Questions aren’t public on your profile until you reply, but....  You can’t reply privately, only publicly.  This leads to escalating abuse and a strong streak of victim blaming.
  5. 5. Anonymity and Deindividuation  Anonymity is discursive not binary  Anonymity can be default or opt-in  Online disinhibition can be valuable in a supportive environment  But such places are targets for pure trolling
  6. 6. Virtual vs reality  “Ordinary” users don’t experience being online ordinarily as “real”.  This is partly positive – young people feel more confident.  But they experience abuse as real.  They are strongly judgemental about fake behaviour.
  7. 7. Not all sites are the same  For teenage girls, Twitter is happier than Facebook or Ask.fm (but my instinct is instagram is better)  Quora and Vimeo are supremely happy in a grown-up way  Actively managed sites are expensive but valuable  Designing out abuse triggers may have a commercial cost
  8. 8. Discussion questions  Much of my research has been about girls and women. Do we know where the problems are for men?  Do we know of any really happy or disastrous sites?  Can we think of ways to make online feel real?

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