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7 Principles for Engaging Users with Visualization

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This presentation highlights findings from my work as a visualization designer. The seven principles are distilled pieces from projects I reviewed or worked on myself. I believe it's important to learn from every project as much as you can and share this experience with the community to grow collectively.

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7 Principles for Engaging Users with Visualization

  1. 1. HELLO! I’m Benjamin from Interactive Thingspresented by Interactive Things 1
  2. 2. INTERACTIVE THINGS User Experience & Data Visualization Studiopresented by Interactive Things 2
  3. 3. DATAVISUALIZATION.CH Resource for Data Visualization & Infographicspresented by Interactive Things 3
  4. 4. 7 Principles for Engaging Users with Visualizationpresented by Interactive Things 5
  5. 5. SUPPLY Build an treasure chest of data.presented by Interactive Things 6
  6. 6. NARRATION Tell compelling stories with visualization.presented by Interactive Things 9
  7. 7. Donald Norman“Stories are important cognitiveevents, for they encapsulate, intoone compact package, information,knowledge, context, & emotion.presented by Interactive Things 10
  8. 8. Edward Segel & Jeffrey HeerNarrative Visualization: Telling Stories with Data Martini Glass Structure Interactive Slideshow Drill-Down Storypresented by Interactive Things 11
  9. 9. New York Times: Faces of the Dead
  10. 10. Edward Segel & Jeffrey HeerNarrative Visualization: Telling Stories with Data Martini Glass Structure Interactive Slideshow Drill-Down Storypresented by Interactive Things 13
  11. 11. New York Times: Budget Forecasts, Compared With Reality
  12. 12. Edward Segel & Jeffrey HeerNarrative Visualization: Telling Stories with Data Martini Glass Structure Interactive Slideshow Drill-Down Storypresented by Interactive Things 15
  13. 13. New York Times: Murder: New York City
  14. 14. PERSONALIZATION Make the reader feel at home.presented by Interactive Things 17
  15. 15. New York Times: Jobless Rate for People Like You
  16. 16. PARTICIPATION Foster the dialog between people.presented by Interactive Things 19
  17. 17. New York Times: Mapping America
  18. 18. ACTION Inspire the user to create real impact.presented by Interactive Things 21
  19. 19. Green Peace & Daniel Fischer: Small Habits
  20. 20. Global Giving & Roland Loesslein: The Humans Development
  21. 21. MEASUREMENT Analyze the hell out of your work.presented by Interactive Things 24
  22. 22. Google Analytics ChartbeatBitly Clicky
  23. 23. UNDP & Interactive Things: Human Development Index 2.0
  24. 24. OECD, Moritz Stefaner & Raureif: Better Life Index
  25. 25. EXPERIMENTATION Push the medium forward.presented by Interactive Things 28
  26. 26. side without overlapping them. In our roadside stand example there are three separate businesses, but what if there were thirty? Thirty bar charts per week lined up next to each other would be too much. A stacked bar chart gives us the total sales, but what if we wanted to compare within each week? We could make a line graph for each store and then plot all thirty on the same graph. That, too, would quickly get overcrowded with information. As weʼve seen, once we exceed about five or six, we start to run out of unique colours, shapes, thicknesses and so on. Graphing thirty at once becomes a mess.400300200100 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Peter Gassner. Designing with Data - PDF. 13th August 2010. © Five Simple Steps.
  27. 27. 141 A Practical Guide to Designing with data ~ Area graphs and charts400300200100 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 This is the niche that horizon graphs are designed to fill. They are basic line graphs split horizontally into a set number of bands. This example uses four bands, but they can contain as many as required. Each of the bands is coloured with an increasing intensity of blue. So far, this is no different than a standard line graph with some interesting shading. The next part is the Eureka! moment. Since we are really only interested in the outer edge of the line graph, why not collapse each of the bands on top of each other to save space?
  28. 28. 200100 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 This is the niche that horizon graphs are designed to fill. They are basic line graphs split horizontally into a set number of bands. This example uses four bands, but they can contain as many as required. Each of the bands is coloured with an increasing intensity of blue. So far, this is no different than a standard line graph with some interesting shading. The next part is the Eureka! moment. Since we are really only interested in the outer edge of the line graph, why not collapse each of the bands on top of each other to save space? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Now we have the same data presented in a quarter of the space. By changing the colour of the shading, the graph appears to be stacking up the parts. There is nothing hiding behind any of the peaks so, unlike 3-D charts, nothing is being obscured. This works with both positive and negative values. Maybe in some weeks the shops were making a loss, which can be represented with a different colour, such as varying intensities of red.
  29. 29. 142400300200100 -100-200-300-400 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Now you can rapidly see which weeks saw gains and which saw losses, and at the same time also watch the line trend upwards or downwards. The horizon graph works really well when large numbers of data sets need to be compared. Converting one line graph into a horizon graph does save some space, but now that we have this ribbon, we can stack more ribbons on top to get a quick view of all
  30. 30. 400 300 200 100 -100 -200 -300 -400 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Now you can rapidly see which weeks saw gains and which saw losses, and at the same time also watch the line trend upwards or downwards. The horizon graph works really well when large numbers of data sets need to be compared. Converting one line graph into a horizon graph does save some space, but now that we have this ribbon, we can stack more ribbons on top to get a quick view of all the different shops and compare them in a limited space.Shop 27Shop 28
  31. 31. Computed Interactive Dynamic Animatedpresented by Interactive Things 32
  32. 32. Radiales Netzwerk
  33. 33. Radial Network withRadiales Netzwerk Edge Bundling
  34. 34. Force Directed Layout
  35. 35. Force Directed Layout
  36. 36. Streamgraph
  37. 37. Voronoi Tessalation
  38. 38. Computed Interactive Dynamic Animatedpresented by Interactive Things 37
  39. 39. Moritz Stefaner: Map Your Moves
  40. 40. PushPopPress: Our Choice
  41. 41. Computed Interactive Dynamic Animatedpresented by Interactive Things 40
  42. 42. GE & Periscopic: Cancer Conversations
  43. 43. Computed Interactive Dynamic Animatedpresented by Interactive Things 42
  44. 44. City of Geneva, Lift & Interactive Things: Ville Vivante
  45. 45. SUPPLY NARRATION PERSONALIZATION ACTION MEASUREMENT EXPERIMENTATIONpresented by Interactive Things 44
  46. 46. Edward Tufte“The idea for information design is:Dont get it original, get it right.presented by Interactive Things 46
  47. 47. MERCI! Don’t hesitate to get in touch: +41 44 267 66 44 hello@interactivethings.com @ixtpresented by Interactive Things 47

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