S     A    F   UVG RVO  1
Flannan IsleThough three men dwell on Flannan IsleTo keep the lamp alight,As we steer’d under the lee, we caughtNo glimmer...
Yet, all too soon, we reached the door--The black, sun-blister’d lighthouse door,That gaped for us ajar.As, on the thresho...
And hunted everywhere,Of the three men’s fate we found no traceOf any kind in any place,But a door ajar, and an untouch’d ...
Show how the MYSTERY is brought out in this poem, by               picking out all DETAILS that the poet has used to      ...
After reading the poem …    1.   Explain why the investigators set sail to Flannan Isle         (verses 1 and 2).    2.   ...
Lighthouses                                                 Week 3Lighthouses are tall buildings with powerful rotating li...
People      On a cold, fretful afternoon in early October 1872, a hansom cab drew up outside the offices of   Lockhart and...
Week 5   Which extract do you prefer and why?   Now write your own extract, using some of the ideas that you have come u...
People (ctd.                                                                                    Week 6SettingBut an August...
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Y9 term 1 composition and comprehension

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Y9 term 1 composition and comprehension

  1. 1. S A F UVG RVO 1
  2. 2. Flannan IsleThough three men dwell on Flannan IsleTo keep the lamp alight,As we steer’d under the lee, we caughtNo glimmer through the night!A passing ship at dawn had broughtThe news; and quickly we set sail,To find out what strange thing might ailThe keepers of the deep-sea light.The winter day broke blue and bright,With glancing sun and glancing spray,As o’er the swell our boat made way,As gallant as a gull in flight.But, as we near’d the lonely Isle;And look’d up at the naked height;And saw the lighthouse towering white,With blinded lantern, that all nightHad never shot a sparkOf comfort through the dark,So ghastly in the cold sunlightIt seem’d, that we were struck the whileWith wonder all too dread for words.And, as into the tiny creekWe stole beneath the hanging crag,We saw three queer, black, ugly birds--Too big, by far, in my belief,For guillemot or shag--Like seamen sitting bold uprightUpon a half-tide reef:But, as we near’d, they plunged from sight,Without a sound, or spurt of white.And still too mazed to speak,We landed; and made fast the boat;And climb’d the track in single file,Each wishing he was safe afloat,On any sea, however far,So it be far from Flannan Isle:And still we seem’d to climb, and climb,As though we’d lost all count of time,And so must climb for evermore. 2
  3. 3. Yet, all too soon, we reached the door--The black, sun-blister’d lighthouse door,That gaped for us ajar.As, on the threshold, for a spell,We paused, we seem’d to breathe the smellOf limewash and of tar,Familiar as our daily breath,As though ‘twere some strange scent of death:And so, yet wondering, side by side,We stood a moment, still tongue-tied:And each with black foreboding eyedThe door, ere we should fling it wide,To leave the sunlight for the gloom:Till, plucking courage up, at last,Hard on each other’s heels we pass’dInto the living-room.Yet, as we crowded through the door,We only saw a table, spreadFor dinner, meat and cheese and bread;But all untouch’d; and no one there: As though, when they sat down to eat,Ere they could even taste,Alarm had come; and they in hasteHad risen and left the bread and meat:For on the table-head a chairLay tumbled on the floor.We listen’d; but we only heardThe feeble cheeping of a birdThat starved upon its perch:And, listening still, without a word,We set about our hopeless search.We hunted high, we hunted low,And soon ransack’d the empty house;Then o’er the Island, to and fro,We ranged, to listen and to lookIn every cranny, cleft or nookThat might have hid a bird or mouse:But, though we searched from shore to shore,We found no sign in any place:And soon again stood face to faceBefore the gaping door:And stole into the room once moreAs frighten’d children steal.Aye: though we hunted high and low, 3
  4. 4. And hunted everywhere,Of the three men’s fate we found no traceOf any kind in any place,But a door ajar, and an untouch’d meal,And an overtoppled chair.And, as we listen’d in the gloomOf that forsaken living-room--O chill clutch on our breath--We thought how ill-chance came to allWho kept the Flannan Light:And how the rock had been the deathOf many a likely lad:How six had come to a sudden endAnd three had gone stark mad:And one whom we’d all known as friendHad leapt from the lantern one still night,And fallen dead by the lighthouse wall:And long we thoughtOn the three we sought,And of what might yet befall.Like curs a glance has brought to heel,We listen’d, flinching there:And look’d, and look’d, on the untouch’d mealAnd the overtoppled chair.We seem’d to stand for an endless while,Though still no word was said,Three men alive on Flannan Isle,Who thought on three men dead.··· Wilfred Wilson Gibson ··· 4
  5. 5. Show how the MYSTERY is brought out in this poem, by picking out all DETAILS that the poet has used to emphasise the points below. Use the spaces provided to note lines, quotations and techniques that you feel help to add a sense of mystery.1. The lonely location2. Normal events and abnormal events3. The investigators’ nervousness4. The search for the missing men5. The history of the lighthouse Week 2 5
  6. 6. After reading the poem … 1. Explain why the investigators set sail to Flannan Isle (verses 1 and 2). 2. Describe the atmosphere and weather as the journey began (verse 3). 3. Identify the simile used in verse 3 to describe the boat and explain why it is effective. 4. In verse four, the atmosphere and weather change. Describe these changes. 5. Describe the birds in verse 4. 6. Explain what the investigators were doing and describe how they felt in verses 5 and 6. 7. What did the investigators find in verse 7? 8. How did the investigators feel about entering the living room in verse 8? 9. Explain what they found in verse 9 and what idea this gave them about what happened to the lighthouse keepers of Flannan Isle. 10. What happened to the ten previous ‘keepers? 11. Describe how you imagine the investigators felt in the final two verses of the poem. 6
  7. 7. Lighthouses Week 3Lighthouses are tall buildings with powerful rotating lights which arepositioned near dangerous rocks, often in the middle of the sea. Theirpurpose is to warn ships of danger. In the past most lighthouses werelooked after by lighthouse keepers whose job it was to ensure that thelights worked properly. Nowadays they are usually operatedmechanically.Answer these questions in complete sentences. 1. Explain what a lighthouse is. 2. Why are lighthouses important? 3. Who used to look after lighthouses? 4. What do you think would be the good and bad things about that job?Imagine that you live in a lighthouse. Fill each box below withappropriate examples of SIGHTS, SOUNDS, SMELLS, TASTES,TOUCHESand FEELINGS which you might experience. Week 4 People 7
  8. 8. People On a cold, fretful afternoon in early October 1872, a hansom cab drew up outside the offices of Lockhart and Selby, shipping agents in the financial heart of London, and a young girl got out and paid the driver. 1. She was a person of sixteen or so – alone, and uncommonly pretty. She was slender and pale, and dressed in mourning, with a black bonnet under which she tucked back a straying twist of blonde hair that the wind had teased loose. She had unusually dark brown eyes for one so fair. Her name was Sally Lockhart; and within fifteen minutes, she was going to kill a man. 2. A man appeared on the corner the cat had been watching, appeared so suddenly and silently you’d have thought he’d just popped out of the ground. The cat’s tail twitched and its eyes narrowed. 3 .Nothing like this man had ever been seen in Privet Drive. He was tall, thin and very old, judging by the silver of his hair and beard, which were both long enough to tuck into his belt. He was wearing long robes, a purple cloak which swept the ground and high-heeled, buckled boots. His blue eyes were light, bright and sparkling behind half-moon spectacles and his nose was very long and crooked, as though it had been broken at least twice. This man’s name was Albus Dumbledore.  Highlight pronouns that link together.  How effective is the pronoun use in these passages?  What would be the effect of using noun phrases instead of pronouns? noun phrase is either a single noun or pronoun or a group ofA pronoun can replace a noun or words containing a noun or a pronoun that function together as aanother pronoun. You use noun or pronoun, as the subject or object of a verb.pronouns like "he," “she,”"which," "none," and "you" to EXAMPLES OF NOUN PHRASES:make your sentences less EG: John was late.repetitive. (John is the noun phrase functioning as the subject of the verb.) EG: The people that I saw coming in the building at nine oclock have just left. (The people ... nine oclock is a lengthy noun phrase, but it functions as the subject of the main verb have just left.) 8
  9. 9. Week 5 Which extract do you prefer and why? Now write your own extract, using some of the ideas that you have come up with from reading these two pieces: 9
  10. 10. People (ctd. Week 6SettingBut an August afternoon, with blue hazes scarfing the harvest slopes, little winds whisperingelfishly in the poplars, and a dancing splendour of red poppies outflaming against the darkcoppice of young firs in a corner of the cherry orchard was fitter for dreams of deadlanguages. The Virgil soon slipped unheeded to the ground, and Anne, her chin propped onher clasped hands, and her eyes on the splendid mass of fluffy clouds that were heaping upjust over Mr J. A. Harrison’s house like a great white mountain, was far away in a deliciousworld… From Anne Of Avonlea by L.M. MontgomeryThe shore was fledged with palm trees. These stood or leaned or reclined against the light and theirgreen feathers were a hundred feet up in the air, The ground beneath them was a bank covered withcoarse grass, torn everywhere by the upheavals of fallen trees, scattered with decaying coconuts andpalm saplings. Behind this was the darkness of the forest proper and the open space of the scar.He jumped down from the terrace. The sand was thick over his black shoes and the heat hit him. Hebecame conscious of the weight of his clothes, kicked his shoes off fiercely and ripped off eachstocking with its elastic garter in a single movement. Then he leapt back on the terrace, pulled off hisshirt, and stood there among the skull-like coconuts with green shadows from the palms and the forestsliding over his skin. He undid the snake-clasp of his belt, lugged off his shorts and pants, and stoodthere naked, looking at the dazzling beach and the water. From Lord of the Flies by William Golding copyright © William Golding  In the extracts, underline the following in different colours:  colours  adjectives  verbs  Look at the atmosphere that is created by the effective use of language. Write a short paragraph describing the atmosphere in the two extracts. 10

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