Meeting of Chief Medical Officers and Chief Nursing OfficersHealth and well-being – a perspective from WHO                ...
Health 2020European policy  framework       Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
Health 2020A WHO European Region where all peoples are enabled and supported in achieving    their full health potential a...
Rapidly changing European context for health                                                      Dublin, Ireland, 9 April...
WHO Constitution   Health is a state of complete physical, mental      and social well-being and not merely the           ...
Bridging six decades of WHO• Health as a fundamental right• Unacceptability of inequality in health• Health and well-being...
WHO ConstitutionThe enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of   health is one of the fundamental rights of every  hu...
Life expectancy at birth: gains over 30 years but      varying between the sexes and across            the WHO European Re...
Mortality from all causes of death        SDR: age- and sex-standardized death rate.                                      ...
Trends in premature mortality in the European Region, by broad                group of causes, 1980–2008                  ...
Increasing attention to inequity                 For richer, for poorer                 Growing inequality is one of the  ...
Economic case for health promotion and                             disease prevention                  Cardiovascular     ...
The Europeanhealth report    2012      Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
Health 2020: two strategic objectives1. Working to improve health for all and reducing health   inequities2. Improving lea...
Health 2020: main priorities• Investing in health through a life-course approach• Tackling the Region’s major health chall...
Health 2020 – reaching higher and wider• Going upstream to address root causes (such as social  determinants)• Investing i...
Additional layer of complexity from austerity: lessons learned from past and present crises                   • Associated...
Health impact of social welfare spending           and GDP growth Social       • Each additional US$ 100 per capita       ...
Challenging the view of health as a cost to society:                               example from the United KingdomHealth s...
WHO/Europe expert group•    International alliance of Member     States, academe, the Organisation for     Economic Co-ope...
Expert group’s definition of well-being “Well-being exists in two dimensions, subjective and objective.” It comprises an i...
Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (1)• Health and well-being are key factors in and  ultimate aims of economic develop...
Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (2)  • Success depends on ability to mobilize other sectors    and high-level politi...
Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (3)  • Economic difficulties are no reason for    inaction on health inequities, as ...
Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (4)  • Health is a fundamental human right.  • Health and well-being are essential r...
Thank you!             Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Health and well-being – A Perspective from WHO, at the EU Presidency Meeting of Chief Medical Officers and Chief Nursing Officers

2,126 views

Published on

Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO Regional Director for Europe, Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,126
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,142
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Health and well-being – A Perspective from WHO, at the EU Presidency Meeting of Chief Medical Officers and Chief Nursing Officers

  1. 1. Meeting of Chief Medical Officers and Chief Nursing OfficersHealth and well-being – a perspective from WHO Zsuzsanna Jakab WHO Regional Director for Europe Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  2. 2. Health 2020European policy framework Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  3. 3. Health 2020A WHO European Region where all peoples are enabled and supported in achieving their full health potential and well-being, and in which countries, individually and jointly, work towards reducing inequalities in health within the Region and beyond. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  4. 4. Rapidly changing European context for health Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013 Photos: S. Turner, 2003; L. Donaldson, 2008 ; I. Brandemer, 2009.
  5. 5. WHO Constitution Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  6. 6. Bridging six decades of WHO• Health as a fundamental right• Unacceptability of inequality in health• Health and well-being as major social goals and resources• Reciprocal relationship between health and development• Need to involve different sectors in working towards health• Need to enable people to take control on the determinants of their health• Need to tackle the determinants of population health Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  7. 7. WHO ConstitutionThe enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  8. 8. Life expectancy at birth: gains over 30 years but varying between the sexes and across the WHO European Region Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  9. 9. Mortality from all causes of death SDR: age- and sex-standardized death rate. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  10. 10. Trends in premature mortality in the European Region, by broad group of causes, 1980–2008 140 Standardized death rate, 0-64 per 100,000 120 100 80 Cause 60 Heart disease Cancer Injuries and violence 40 Infectious diseases Mental disorders 20 0 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Year
  11. 11. Increasing attention to inequity For richer, for poorer Growing inequality is one of the biggest social, economic and political challenges of our time. But it is not inevitable … – The Economist, special edition, 13 October 2012 (http://www.economist.com/node/21564414)
  12. 12. Economic case for health promotion and disease prevention Cardiovascular €169 billion annually in the European Union diseases (CVD) (EU); health care accounting for 62% of costs €125 billion annually in the EU, equivalent to Alcohol-related harm 1.3% of gross domestic product (GDP) Obesity-related illness Over 1% GDP in the United States; 1–3% of health (including diabetes and expenditure in most countries CVD) Cancer 6.5% of all health care expenditure in Europe Road traffic injuries Up to 2% of GDP in middle- and high-income countriesSources: data from Leal et al. (Eur Heart J, 2006, 27(13):1610–1619 (http://www.herc.ox.ac.uk/pubs/bibliography/Leal2006)),Alcohol-related harm in Europe – Key data (Brussels, European Commission Directorate-General for Health and Consumer Protection, 2006 (http://ec.europa.eu/health/archive/ph_determinants/life_style/alcohol/documents/alcohol_factsheet_en.pdf)),Sassi (Obesity and the economics of prevention – Fit not fat. Paris, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 2010) and Stark (EJHP Practice, 2006, 12(2):53–56(http://www.google.co.uk/url?q=http://www.eahp.eu/content/download/25013/162991/file/SpecialReport53-56.pdfandsa=Uandei=BNI4T-K7JoKL0QGXs6HFAgandved=0CBwQFjAFandusg=AFQjCNHS922oF8d0RLN5C14ddpMVeRn8BA). Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  13. 13. The Europeanhealth report 2012 Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  14. 14. Health 2020: two strategic objectives1. Working to improve health for all and reducing health inequities2. Improving leadership and participatory governance for health Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  15. 15. Health 2020: main priorities• Investing in health through a life-course approach• Tackling the Region’s major health challenges• Strengthening people-centred health systems• Creating resilient communities and supportive environments Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  16. 16. Health 2020 – reaching higher and wider• Going upstream to address root causes (such as social determinants)• Investing in public health, primary care, health protection, health promotion and disease prevention• Making the case for whole-of-government and whole-of- society approaches• Offering a framework for integrated and coherent interventions
  17. 17. Additional layer of complexity from austerity: lessons learned from past and present crises • Associated with a doubling of the risk of illness and 60% less likelihood of recovery from disease* • Strong correlation with increased alcohol poisoning, liver cirrhosis, ulcers, mental disorders**Unemployment • Increase of suicide incidence: 17% in Greece and Latvia, 13% in Ireland*** • Active labour market policies and well-targeted social protection expenditure can eliminate most of these adverse effects**** Sources: * Kaplan, G. (2012). Social Science and Medicine, 74: 643–646. ** Suhrcke M, Stuckler D (2012). Social Science and Medicine, 74:647–653. *** Stuckler D. et al. (2011). Lancet, 378:124–125. **** Stuckler D. et al. (2009) . Lancet, 374:315–323
  18. 18. Health impact of social welfare spending and GDP growth Social • Each additional US$ 100 per capita spent on social welfare (including welfare health) is associated with a 1.19%spending reduction in mortality • Each additional US$ 100 per capita GDP increase in GDP is associated with only a 0.11% reduction in mortality Source: Stuckler D et al. Budget crises, health, and social welfare programmes. BMJ, 2010 (http://www.bmj.com/content/340/bmj.c3311).
  19. 19. Challenging the view of health as a cost to society: example from the United KingdomHealth sector’s contribution to the economy• Health and social care system in north-west region, £8.2 billion (10% of regional total GDP: £88 billion): 60% on staff with £2 billion on goods and services• 340 000 people employed directly (12% of regional employment)• 0.5% of regional businesses primarily in the health sector: 780 businesses• 50% of health sector firms have turnover of £100 000–499 000• Capital spending programmes for 5 years: £4.5 billion Source: Claiming the health dividend. London, The King’s Fund, 2002 (http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/publications/claiming-health-dividend).
  20. 20. WHO/Europe expert group• International alliance of Member States, academe, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), European Commission and other stakeholders• Tasks: • provide definition of and framework for well-being in the context of health (subjective and objective); and • advise on measurement of and setting targets for well-being. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  21. 21. Expert group’s definition of well-being “Well-being exists in two dimensions, subjective and objective.” It comprises an individual’s experience of his or her life (subjective), as well as a comparison of life circumstances (objective) with social norms and values. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  22. 22. Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (1)• Health and well-being are key factors in and ultimate aims of economic development, innovation and investment in human development: goals of a fairer and sustainable society. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  23. 23. Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (2) • Success depends on ability to mobilize other sectors and high-level political support. • Changing individual behaviour requires supportive policy environment. • Reducing inequities is a priority for all sectors. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  24. 24. Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (3) • Economic difficulties are no reason for inaction on health inequities, as their costs are huge. No society can afford inaction. • New forms of governance for health are needed: horizontal, vertical, wider, more inclusive, open, transparent. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  25. 25. Health 2020 – Concepts and approaches (4) • Health is a fundamental human right. • Health and well-being are essential resources for economic, social and human development. Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013
  26. 26. Thank you! Dublin, Ireland, 9 April 2013

×