Manchester and Ahmedabad: From internationalisation toglobalisation – or where did cotton manufacture go and why?• An hist...
John Forbes Watson(1827-1892) Photographfrom Journal of IndianArt, Vol III, No 25
Forbes Watson did not travel to India to collect textiles.Instead he and a team of assistants cut up fabrics from theIndia...
…the material for which he is famed has nothitherto been subject to any sort of detailedanalysis, and systematic attempts ...
The 700 specimens … show what the people ofIndia affect and deem suitable in the way oftextile fabrics, and if the supply ...
India is in a position to become amagnificent customer … to clothebut a mere percentage of such avast population would dou...
Indian taste in decoration is in the highest senserefined. Such combinations of form and colour asmany of these specimens ...
…That we shall be able to determine whatproductions can and what cannot be mademost cheaply by machinery. This is a pointw...
…the mystery hardly finds a parallel in the history of commerce.The bones of the cotton weavers are bleaching the plains o...
http://tmoi.org.uk/
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Global Threads: Liz Rideal
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Global Threads: Liz Rideal

286 views

Published on

Artist Liz Rideal joined us to discuss her her practise, including her work featured in COTTON: Global Threads (11 Feb - May 13 2012). This talk was recorded on 10 May 2012. Presentation and images © Liz Rideal.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
286
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Global Threads: Liz Rideal

  1. 1. Manchester and Ahmedabad: From internationalisation toglobalisation – or where did cotton manufacture go and why?• An historical and contemporary analysis of cotton manufacture inAhmedabad, Gujurat against the backdrop of British colonial rule.• Past and contemporary technologies, products and markets, andintegration into the global cotton trade.
  2. 2. John Forbes Watson(1827-1892) Photographfrom Journal of IndianArt, Vol III, No 25
  3. 3. Forbes Watson did not travel to India to collect textiles.Instead he and a team of assistants cut up fabrics from theIndia Museum’s stores in London to create 20 sets of 18volume sample books. Some fabrics in the India Museum’scollection had been acquired through trade, but many hadcome to the museum in 1855 after being shown at the ParisInternational Exhibition.
  4. 4. …the material for which he is famed has nothitherto been subject to any sort of detailedanalysis, and systematic attempts to assess therelationship between his avowed intentions inassembling two major series of Indian textilesamples and the actual impact their distributionmight have had on the industry are only nowbeginning. (Swallow 1999: 30)
  5. 5. The 700 specimens … show what the people ofIndia affect and deem suitable in the way oftextile fabrics, and if the supply of these is tocome from Britain, they must be imitated there.What is wanted, and what it is to be copied tomeet that want, is thus accessible for study inthese Museums.
  6. 6. India is in a position to become amagnificent customer … to clothebut a mere percentage of such avast population would double thelooms of Lancashire.
  7. 7. Indian taste in decoration is in the highest senserefined. Such combinations of form and colour asmany of these specimens exhibit everyone will callbeautiful; and this beauty has one constant feature– a quietness and harmony which never fail tofascinate … There is [also] no want ofornamentation … The portions which areconcealed when the garment is on the wearer arerarely decorated.
  8. 8. …That we shall be able to determine whatproductions can and what cannot be mademost cheaply by machinery. This is a pointwhich it is important to decide. It willprobably be found that many of the elaborateIndian patterns have still to be produced byhand.
  9. 9. …the mystery hardly finds a parallel in the history of commerce.The bones of the cotton weavers are bleaching the plains ofIndia.Governer General of India 1834-5.The prefaces of Indian textile catalogues resonate, appropriately,with condemnations of British imperial policy. But, ironically,even if not surprisingly, the hero of those working on the groundto support and reinvigorate the handloom industry today…(is)the man whose intention was ostensibly to undercut that veryindustry – the Reporter for the Products of India, Dr. JohnForbes Watson.(Swallow 1999: 43)
  10. 10. http://tmoi.org.uk/

×