RCEC Email 5.3.03 (a)

633 views

Published on

Reconstructing Climatic and Environmental Changes"
FOIA
Email 5.3.03 (a)

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
633
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

RCEC Email 5.3.03 (a)

  1. 1. ~~~~~~~~- ~~~~~~~~~~~~Page 1 of 37 RECORD TYPE: FEDERAL (NOTES MAIL) CREATOR: "S. Fred Singer" <singerfisepp crg> ( "S. Fred Singer" <singer~sepp.org>F UN CREATION DATE/TIME: 3-MAY-2003 17:07: 5.00 SUBJECT:: The Week That Was, May 3, :003 TO:comments~sepp.org Ccomments~sepp.crg [ OSTP READ :UNKNOWN BCC:Kenneth L. Peel CN=Renneth L. P el/OU=CEQ/O=EOP [ CEQ I READ:EJNKNOWN TEXT: THIS NEWSLETTER IS SENT IN PLAIN TEXT. VIEW THE FORMATTED VERSION (ATTACHED) OR HTML VERSION AT http://vw.sepp.org New on the Web Earth Day 2003--- A Satire Tuesday, April 22, was Earth Day, and I missed it. And I had such wonderful plans to mark the occasion, too. I was going to rearrange the solar pa els on my roof in the shape of a peace symbol, and make everyone in oux household bathe in the same tub full of water, then scoop out a big pot an~ boil it for soup -- reduce, reuse, regurgitate, I always say. 'I was going to implant microchip tran mitters in the squirrels in our spruce trees to harness the energy fr m their scampering to power the grow lamps over my organic sprout garden. d I was going to while away the afternoon listening to world music on my hand-cranked CD player. (if you don't know what world music is, think Peruvian herdsman playing the recorder superimposed over sperm whalE mating calls.) I was going to read an ode to Oaia, tle Earth spirit, while our children danced around holding candles they hac formed themselves from the honeycombs of free-range bees. And I was going to collect the sparrow guano from underneath our winter bird feede s to use as fertilizer in our Victory garden -- victory over red-meat consu ption, genetically modified foods and corporate agribusiness, that is! Drat, now all that is going to have tc wait until next Earth Day. I only hope my wife -- sorry, co-equal life partner -- will forgive me for not buying her those woolen tights and Bimkenstock sandals she's been wanting. Thank God -- sorry -- thank goddess, Edmonton's main celebrations won't take place until May 4. That'll give me time to handcraft all my presents and wrap them (in recycled newspapers I'll decorate myself with native-berry paints, of course). Actually, I did commemorate Earth Day the best way possible -- by reading yet another scholarly study that deburks the notion our current climate is unusually hot, and getting hotter due to manmade greenhouse emissions. The latest study, from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, carries the vernacular title 20th-Cen ury Climate Not So Hot. Co-authored file://D:SEARCH-7tO-3•EQ048 00aogO3..ceq.txt 8/14/2003
  2. 2. Page 2 of 37 by Smithsonian astrophysicists Sallie Baliunas and Willie Soon, Craig Idso and Sherwood Tdso of the Center for tle Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change, and David Legates of the Cent r for Climate Research at the University of Delaware, it notes: "20h Century temperatures were generally cooler than during the medieval warmt . The 20th century, contrary to the ala mism of environmentalists, was neither the warmest century in the pa t millennium, nor the one marked by the most severe weather. Belief that the globe is warming faster than ever before, and so fast that the rise thr atens the environment, is the result of examining variations in temperature over too short a time span. The Medieval Warn Period, from approx mtely 800 to 1300 AD, was as much as 4 C warmer on average than today, wor dwide, nearly as warn as the upper extreme of U.N. climate projections f r the coming century. And the natural world did not implode, far from it. G eenland sustained agricultural colonies through much of this period. The seas teemed with fish. Wars were less common in Europe than during the later Middle Ages, in part, because harvests were plentiful and less pres ure existed for campaigns of conquest to acquire new lands and resources. CE thedral construction on a grand scale (a sign of relative affluence) boomed across Europe. Mesoamerica also flourished. Remarkable in the Harvard-Smithsonian study is the depth of analysis it contains of the historical temperature record and its finding that the Medieval Warm Period was global, not rherely confined to the North Atlantic region, as some have argued. The study, funded in part by NASA and the National (U.S.) Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration -- two organizations known for their enthusiastic support of the manmade wArning theory -- examined the results from more than 240 scientific reports on temperature "proxies," biological, cultural and geological fingerprints That indirectly reveal temperatures centuries, millennia or even eons, agcl. "For example, tree-ring studies can yield yearly records of temperature and precipitation trends, while glacier ide cores record those variables over longer time scales ... Borehole data, cultural data, glacier advances or retreats, geomorphology, isotopic analysis from lake sediments, ice cores, peat moss, corals, stalagmites and fo sils, even dust and pollen, can provide clues to-past climate, even sometimes, very detailed indicators.' No study to date has been as thorough or wide-ranging as the Harvard-Smithsonian study, and few haye taken as much advantage of the "research advances in reconstructing ncen cimtes" that has occurred in recent years. Why then, do other scientists and environmentalists claim temperature records of the past century-and-a-halt show such potentially catastrophic warming? Because the Little Ice Age f~llowed the end of the Medieval Warm Period. This nearly 600-year-period o abnormally cold climate was ending just as modern, reasonably scientific wather records were beginning. If 1850 is used as year zero -- as t baseline against which current temperatures are compared -- it is go ~ng to look dramatically warmer today than a century ago, because the Little Ice Age was just ending in 1850. But if 1850 is seen for the anomaly it isj and the past 1,000 or more years are placed in context, then today's heat Is hardly that striking, and certainly not cause for alarm. file://D:SEARCH_7_9_O3-CEQ048-fL~yao4I OO3seq.txt 8/14/2003
  3. 3. Page 3 of 37 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - …--- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - This article appeared in the Edmonton Journal, April 23, and is reprinted with permission from Lomne Gunter, who is a Columnist for the Edmonton Journal, and an Editorial Board Member of the National Post. Prime time fiction about Alaska Warmil grvdn iey odrntol The urban legends of global warming a~epoiiglvl odrntol for NBC's The West Wing, but also Davild Suzuki By Ross McKitrickI Financial Post (Canada), April 16, 2003 One of the current sub-plots in NBC's The West Wing concerns a glacier in Alaska, which melted and deluged a downstream village. The White House suddenly found itself dealing with th4 "first casualties of global warming." Chief of Staff Leo McGarry ~at enthralled as a "hydroclimatologist" from the U.S. Gedlogical Survey told him that mean temperatures in Alaska have soared seven degrees (Fahrenheit) in the past 30 years, creating unstable lakes thad are prone to overflowing, wiping out downstream villages. Last week's show ended with the adxnin stration calling for massive cuts in so-called greenhouse gas emissions. T is would, we're to suppose, somehow help drowning Alaskans. West Wing is political drama that relishes high-stakes battles of good-versus-evil, so maybe tonight we'll see some obnoxious, cigar-chomping oil executieI(or Republican senator) derail President Jed Bartlett's idea. Then c~t to an SUV commercial. It is a fictional show, of course, so it's only appropriate that it relies on fictional issues to captivate the l.udience. Nor should it surprise us that the whole scenario is fictional. If some "hydroclimatologist" from the Geological Survey stood in the Chief 4f Staff's office and claimed Alaska had warmed seven degrees in 30 years, the response would not be to upend the nation's energy policy. The respo~ise would be to pick up a phone and call the Alaska State Climatologist f~r confirmation, who would have quickly put the story on ice. It is an urban legend that Alaska has warmed so much, so fast. No matter how much the Alaskans try to debunk i I,itlve Inmost recently in the fevered imagination of West Wing scri~twriters. Last summer, The New York Times ran a story quoting unnamed "federal sources" that said Alaska had warmed ;even degrees in 30 years. Then it ran an editorial denouncing the U.S. govetninent's apparent indifference to this calamity. The Alaskan Climate Research Center (kCRC) contacted the paper and gave it data showing no such warming had take~ place. The mean temperature rose about 2.4F (about 0.4C per decade) i the 1971-2000 period. The entire increase occurred in one jump in 1976 L77, probably due to a circulation realignment in the Pacific ocean. A t merature index formed using data from Fairbanks, Anchorage, Nome, and barrow (the "FANB" index) shows, if anything, a slight cooling trend sinch 1979. The Times was never able to identify asource for its claim, and it printed a retraction, sort of. It did find a scientist who figured that if you look in the right places and pick an earliler start and end date you could get a file:/D:SEARCH_7_9 03CQ08fa403_ceq.txt 8/14/2003
  4. 4. Page 4 of 37 mean increase of maybe 5.4 degrees over- a 30 year span. In its retraction, went up the Times' fudged the point a bit, saytng Alaska's mean temperature 5.4 degrees, rather than seven, over ti~e past 30 years. The ACRC responded again saying that n4, this is still wrong. It posted a their map (http://climate.gi.alaska.edu/chanpe) showing the record of all weather stations for the 1971-2000 interval. In the accompanying text it of states: "There is not a single first-class weather station in all decades." Alaska, which reported 5F temperature increase for the last three The highest increase, 4.2 degrees, wash at Barrow. One of the lowest (1.7F) was at nearby Kotzebue. Wing, The Times dropped the story, but it hab now resurfaced on the West where earnest White House staffers will no doubt run with it for a few jobs in weeks, hoping to bludgeon the oil induistry and kill a few thousand oil-producing states like, say, Alaska'. Once they've moved past this plot again line, the seven-degree-warminlg-in-30i-ears claim will surely pop up somewhere, but hopefully riot in the real West Wing. The same That wasn't the only bit of global warming fiction on TV recently. night as the fictional glacier melted, TVOntario interviewed David Suzuki on its current affairs show, Studio 2.1 Apparently some scientists, report sponsored in part by the David Suzuki Foundation, have put out a arguing that global warming will cause the Great Lakes to boil dry, or yet overflow, or do something or other a dew decades from now. Ho-hum another apocalyptic enviro-scare: It's starting to drag on like a secular Left Behind series. was Mr. I didn't watch much of the interview, but what caught my attention Suzuki's claim that when he was a boy growing up in London, Ontario, winter winter used to set in at the end of October, but now it's warmed up so much arrives a lot later. Global warming, you see. It's not the ups and downs but these rapid warming trends we need to worry about. station So the next day I looked up the tempetature records for the weather at London's airport. The data are spo ty prior to the Second World War, but at Dr. there's a continuous record after 194 i, ending at 1990. I'm guessing S's vintage but I figure this is earl{ enough. data I don't think much of running trend lines through averaged temperature as a way of measuring "climate," but this is how the debate often gets London framed. And it shows the October-Novefibr average temperature in fell from 1940 to 1990 at a rate of -9.2 degrees Celsius per decade. on "Fell," as in cooling. As in, October and November are now colder, average, than when Mr. Suzuki was a lid awaiting winter in London. The annual average also shows cooling, at about 0.1 degrees C per decade. least not Unfortunately the temperature data arh not posted after 1990, at at the NASA collection where I was lopking across (http: //www.giss.nasa.gov/data/update gistemp/station data/) . But the lake at Erie, Penn., there is a wather station that continues to post 0.26 its data. The October-November temper ture average there fell by degrees C per decade from 1940 to 2001 (see chart) . The annual average fell the by about 0.13 degrees C per decade from 1940 t& 2001. In other words area has gotten colder, not warmer. Incidentally, it is a real annoyance that Environment Canada no longer gives its temperature data away. Alm tal th aaian weather stations reporting into the NASA database stopped releasing the post-199O numbers is a for free use by the public. You are exected to pay for it now. This 8/14/2003 file:/ID:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQ048..f..yao4gOO3seq.txt
  5. 5. Page 5 of 37 dollars on climate change government that brags about spending birllions of budget for its initiatives, including $350-million in the most recent slush fund, not to mention so-called "Sustainable Development Tec iology" and however many tens of millions for the Climate Chang& Action Fund, hundreds of thousands to put those asi~ine commercials on TV telling people will stop global that sealing their windows and turningi down the heat that warming. Yet it won't spend the money vo make available the basic data of local would allow people to see long term, u~-to-date records people to know. temperatures. Makes you wonder what it doesn't want of the public eye for a Global warming and Kyoto have, merciful ly, been out while. Some commentators who never grasped the issue in the first place anti-Kyoto concerns were have triumphantly used this as evidencp that the in Canada because the all overblown. In reality, the story is quiet here Kyoto. How that feds have all but abandoned any intention of implementing the global warmers are came about is a story for another day. Stateside, and are laying the still sore about Bush's decision to reject Kyoto, groundwork for a new political push to' bring it back. Since the idea that always a fiction, it is Kyoto would somehow benefit the global~ climate was the lead. only fitting that the entertainment injdstry is taking at the University of Ross McKitrick is an associate professor of economics Science, Policy and Guelph, and coauthor of Taken By Storir: The Troubled . A big seller in Canada Politics of Global Warming (www.takenlhystorm.info) and up for a Donner Prize, it is also short listed for the Canadian Science Writers Association award. The Week That Was (May 3, 2003) bogtto you by SEPP FROM 1. New on the Web: A DOUBLE FEATURE ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING CANADA: Lorne Gunter's satire of Earth Day and Ross Mcxitrick's skewering of the NY Times, "West Wing," and David Suzuki. http: //www~sepp.org/NewSEPP/EarthDay~,unter- html http: //www. sepp.org/NewSEPP/PrimeTime laska Mc::'itrick.html BILLION BARRELS: That's 2. CANADA'S OIL SANDS RESERVES APPRAISED AT 180 sufficient to cover all US oil importt for 45 years. 3. DEBATE ABOUT NATURAL GAS RESERVES NEW STUDY CLAIMS AT LEAST 65-YEAR SUPPLY 4. DEBATE ABOUT NATURAL GAS RESERVES: GAS WON'T BE CHEAP 5. DEBATE ABOUT PLUTONIUMT: CANCER RIS' HIGHER AT ROCKY FLATS PLANT? 6. DEBATE ABOUT PLUTONIUM -- CONTINU3D 7. SWEDEN PREFERS NOT TO FREEZE IN T E DARK: Won't close nuclear reactor billion barrels by Oil and 2. Canada's Oil sands reserves apprised at 180 Gas Journal. to 180 billion barrels Estimates of Canada's oil reserves jumped from 4.9 in the world, acc. to this year, making it the second-largjst oil reserve an annual survey by the authoritativd O&GJ. While the resource had been recoverable and known for some time, it has now beconk economically therefore included as "reserves." with sand and The Alberta oil sands contain tar-like bitumen mixed Thanks to technology clay. Hot water is used to separate the bitumen. 8/14/2003 filel/D ASEARCH_7_9_03..CEQ048..tyao goo3sreq~xt
  6. 6. Page 6 of 37 are now estimated at around $8 a barrel. e Kyoto Protocol, the outlook is But because of Canada's adherence to t from a C$3.5-billion investment and Cloudy. Koch industries has withdrawn -billion plan. [Financial Post Petro-Canada is reconsidering its C$5. what Ottawa plans to do after 2012 4/29/033 . There is great concern about has offered no guarantees, in follow-ups to Kyoto. The federal government adding to costs. nts and so uncertainty is discouraging investm tled, "Oilsands' promise may A May 02, 2003 National Post article t Ls becoming too expensive to produce" evaporate: This fabled lode of wealth ng or holding off on their oilsands described how many companies are dropp ated uncertainties, some are citing developments. Most are citing Kyoto-re g projects, but either way, the increasing costs from numerous competi dwindling. number of active oilsands projects is prospects for lowering On the other hand, there are technologlical production costs. Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the developer of has long espoused the the highly successful CANlDU nuclear reactor, reactor that supplies hot water 'Slowpoke" concept, a 10 MW (thermal) The Advanced rather than steam for electric power generation. wter moderation, but light water CANDU (using enriched uranium, heavy being physically cooling) can be built with a cost sav ~g of 40%, source for the hot water needed for smaller. It might be the ideal energy producing oil from Canadian tar sandsi itarrels per year, much of it from With US oil imports now at 4 billion interest in seeing to it unstable sources, there should be considerable developed. If the US goes along with that the Canadian oil reserves can be for Alaskan natural gas through Canada in supporting the single pipeline the MacKenzie Delta, a deal could be thde that will save billions for US win-win situation. It may have to taxpayers and make Canadians richer --la - perhaps in 2004. from Ottawa wait until the Chretien government departs Committee says that the levels of 3. A new survey by the Potential Gas natural gas are larger than previouslf thought. ves from the natural gas industry, The committee, made up of representat says that 1,311 trillion government agencies and academic instbtutions, existed as of the end of 2002 in cubic feet (Tcf) in natural gas reso(rces of a 65-year supply of natural gas the United States. That's the equivallent size of the base actually increased at current rates of consumption. The since the committee's last report in 12000, even though 39 Tcf of natural gas has been withdrawn.I to promote greater use of "It makes no sense for laws and regulations independence and environmental natural gas for increased national e ergy regulations hamper the ability reasons, while at the same time conflicting ugh supply to market to meet this of natural gas producers to bring en of the American Gas Association. growing demand," says David Parker, ~EO creates price volatility, he adds. The mismatch between supply and demad to industrial operations to That hurts all users from apartment dwelers for lawmakers to adopt an energy electric generators. The time is right and environmental benefits of bill that considers the projected dem'and that make drilling less natural gas, as well as the new techhologies invasive, Parker says. file://D:SEARCH_7_9_0 E4jyo103cqtt8/14/2003
  7. 7. Page 7 of 37 contend that such studies are opponents of new exploration,~ however, res~ults are therefore suspect. Resource generally industry financed and the that added drilling would be levels are exaggerated, which means environmentally harmful. Supplies are adequate through 2025, they sources. say-enough time to develop alternativelenergy has passed a measure to allow The debate rages in Congress. The Hous Refuge (ANqWR) but the Senate has drilling in the Alaska National wildlife get pshed through in any Conference voted nay, although the item could have two versions. Republican lawmakers Committee bill that reconciles the to promote qovernment mandates said that they might agree to support renewable energy if Senate Democrats would give in on ANWR. The Aserves from ANWR at 35 Tcf (and Administration estimates natural-gas Siope). perhaps up to 100 Tcf from the North (From Issue Alert by Ken Silverstein) * * ** * * ** * ** * ** * ** k*********** * * * * ** * * ** * ** * * * * * * ** 4. Gas won't be cheap gas in a big way because it is We have turned as a country to natural 4ow, as we become dependent upon it, perceived as clean, cheap, and ample. it will become especially it is neither inexpensive nor abundand. as s~ ortage of power in this country, noticeable the next time there is a h aetm hr xs ation a we try to turn on more gas-power gene point, $5 gas will shortage of gas to store away for wint~er season. At that headed for a potential major become a very cheap memory. We are alto weather patterns merely approximate shortage this coming winter, if the historical trends. However, as you might expect, I take ~ssue with your attempt to be balanced some housekeeping: You refer to in your approach to the subject. Firs, s ~plies. I am quite sure you meant depletion rates of 29% for existing amount by which reserves are reduced decline rates. Depletion refers to th~ and we are not losing reserves at through a given amount of productions refer to the amount by which anywhere near that rate. Decline rated or set of wells decreases from one periodic production from a given well by about 29%, and the rate is period to the next. New wells are dec~lining heading north of 30% quickly. to do with the natural gas. The Second, the ANWR debate has very little fro Alaska and/or Canada's MacKenzie decision to bring natural gas down We could pipe natural gas from Delta is a separate issue with opening ANWR. evn consider ANWR as a possible source. Alaska for years without having to ANR is mostly about oil.r of u the difference in our shortfall You mentioned that Canada has made you failed (probably for lack of natural gas production until now, but is starting to fall off also. space) to mention that Canadian prodiction has fallen, this is doubly bad. Coming at a time when our own production is starting to import more Mdxico You might also have mentioned that unless the U.S. is natural gas from the U.S., a trend that should continue opened up to more exploration. studies showing a 65± year supply You also neglected to mention that tliese viability for much of those do virtually nothing to consider commiercial Ideposits in our back yard, and deposits estimates. You and I may have some estimates of gross availability. But such as those are figured into these off days environment than gas deposits they are no more accessible under to 8/14/2003 file:/DASEARCH_7_9_03 CEQ048__f..yao~gOO3..ceq.txt
  8. 8. Page 8 of 37 do a the into reserve estimates is to the coast of Florida. And to include mak ng restricted areas accessible. great disservice to the debate over drilling is environmentally evil have People who continue to claim that as many ~times, Such efficient advances watched the movie "Giant" one too along with the impr yed the productivity directional drilling have greatly for the clean activity of newer wells, a fact hat is inconvenient to get the environmentalists to "greens". it will take a lot of effort never will, since reality accept this, and many of the current gdneration threatens their raison d'etre. supportive of our need to expand You say some environmentalists are to The tact is it only takes one group exploration and drilling efforts. expand our hydrocarbon asset effotrt to close down, or greatly impede, any efforts to expand base. Various groups have successfully blocked numerous prodIucing now. drilling into areas that should be of i.ndustry in the US because of higher We have already lost a huge amount has tiat industrial use of natural gas gas prices, as evidenced by the fact 7.2 Bcf/day in 2003. Even to al estimated dropped from 17.2 Bcf/day in 2000 this next winter with that decline, we run a very real -isk of entering season at any cost. without enough gas to last the heating James R. Halloran Energy Analyst, National City Bank Plant (By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (AP)- 5. Cancer Risk Higher At Rocky Flats n clear weapons components and inhaled Rocky Flats employees who assembled risk of lung cancer, a new study radioactive particles had an increase~ that workers who dealt with plutonium found. The $2.5 million study found who to d velop lung cancer than workers were about two times more likely of Colorado Health 4y the University were not exposed. The study was done Health and Sciences Center and the Colorado Depaitment of Public Environment. who died of lung cancer with 720 Researchers compared 180 former workejrs heaithy. Those who died of lung cancer other workers who were considered on average. Dr. James Ruttenber, had higher levels of radiation exposufe offers the first concrete information who led the study, said the research is linked to plutonium in the United States that lung cancer along "We have supporting evidence from other studies that, ingestion. exposure causes that plutonium with our findings, support the hypothesis data to lung cancer,'' Ruttenber said. He sai.d researchers will study the plutonium should be changed. ''One determine if standards for handling > have '' he said. "~'We need to make sure that we case study is not enough, changes.'' robust findings before we make sweeping health department, said other factors Doug Benev'ento, director of the state 'You have to put it a r Isk of cancer. have been shown to cause more of likely to develop lung seven times as into context: If you smoke, you're link cancer,'' he said. He also said the study did not definitively factors, the plant, noting other worker's cancers to their employmentl~at or pure chance such as exposure to chemicals at hom4, lifestyle differences could explain the elevated risk results. wh4 worked at Rocky Flats for 26 years, Arvada resident Wally Gulden, 65, or satisfied with the said he wasn't surprised by the findings cancers not related to the study. ''There are more of us out there with 8/14/2003 file://D:SEARCH_7_9_OXCEQ048f_LyaoLgOO3sceq.txt
  9. 9. Page 9 of 37 ' who has non-Hodgkin's lymphomna. ones that were studied,'' said Gulden, to know if I ingest ed plutonium, and I want worked in a hot spot and I know has f iled a claim under the Radiation it's related to my work.' ' Gulden people suffering from Exposure compensation Act program, whi dhcompensates War-era a result of their work on Cold cancer and other illnesses as there aren't any,' weapons projects. "'I hoped for more answers, but Gulden said. The lung cancer findings were part of 4 broader study that tracked 16,303 also found between 11952 and 1989. The study people who worked at the plant brain 2.5 times more likely to develop that Rocky Flats workers were p an to examine those findings tumors than other people. Researches further. for almost tri gers for nuclear warheads Rocky Flats manufactured plutonium of safety and environmental 40 years. It closed in 1989 because uD and will become a wildlife problems. The site is being cleaned Occupational by the N tional Institute for refuge. The study was funded Safety and Health studI On the Net: Rocky Flats workers erstudy/idxhm http: //Www.cdphe.state.co.us/rf/rfpwo But Plutonium is one of the ost dangerous poisons known --- 6. Myth: "Tonticological Profile for Plutonium," Reality: Three studies in report, for Toxic Substances and Disease prepared for and issued by Agency collaboration Control) Atlanta, Georgia, in Registry, Centers for Disease show just the Agency, December 1990, with U.S. Environmental Protection opposite: plutonium the yeah of this report) of 26 **A 37-year study(as of 1990, duni g World War II with plutonium workers at Los Alarnos laboratory a mean of 95,0 0 picocuries plutonium with deposition ranging from 2,000 to number of of 2.0 vs. 6.6 in a comparable 26,000 picocuries showed mortality have occurred the general population. In addition, no malignant neoplasms f llow-up. in this group during this extensive 224 LOS Alamos workers with average **Study begun in 1974 of an adtoa picocuries plutonium showed 43 deaths whole body deposition of 19,000 The number of the general population. compared to 77 in a comparable the general neqplasms was 8 vs. 15 in number of deaths due to malignant lung dancer vs. five in the general population, including only one population. at the Rocky Flats plutonium facility **Study of 7,112 workers employed rksults. Observed deaths of workets during 1952-1979 showed comparable i4 comparable numbers of general were significantly less than those vs. neoplasms were also less (107 populations (452 vs. 831) . Malignant 167). By Clinton *Bastin* <clintonbastin~emhilmsn.com> * ** * **** ** * * ** ** ** ** ** ** k* ***** * * ** * * * ** * ** * Sweden changes its mind: Won't close nuclear reactor 7. (with support from the Left and 7. The socialist-democratic government file:/D:SEARCH_7_9_OCQ08fYJgOSqtt8/14/2003
  10. 10. Page 10 of 37 as not to~ close B,,rsebeck 2 in 2003, from Center parties) has decided during guarantee adequacy of supply originally planned. It could not half its electric power from nuclear extreme cold weather. Sweden obtains reactors. ~~ * **; ~~ ~ ***************** ~~~~…AT TEXT: ]SREOP0l300G4OAY.001 to ASCII, Unable to convert NSREOP01O2U[ATTACH-D The following is a HEX DUMP: 00 0 OoOO0000O3EO00300FEFF090006000000000 DOCF11EOAlBIlAElOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOoo 00o soooooooloOOOOOFEFFFFFFQOOOQOO00750 7 0oooooo0oo01OO00OQ76000000000000000010 FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFPFFFF OOOOFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFPFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFVFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF~FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF 0010 000 o00 0000 04 0 000897600000E0O FFFFFFFFFFECA5ClQO372009040000OF812BFQC 0000 0000 000 Oooooooo00000904l600229000003770000037 626A626A551655160000000000000000000 0 0 Q 00 000000000FFFFOFOO 0 0 0 Q0 0 Q0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7C000089720000000000000000000000 30000 OOOOOOOOOOOOoOOOFFFFOFOOOOQOO~oOOOOQOOO(FFFFOFOOQOOOOOOOOOQQOOOQOOOOOOOQOOOOOO0 3 0 0 0 DA0 3 0 0 0000000000DA03000000000000D0A 400 006 Co~O0000000DA03000000000000DA0 4 0 0 0 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOEE03000000000000B88 OOOOOOOQDAO3000000000000DA030000l Cl4000044000000EE03 14 00ool4 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 ooooooOOOO88l400000000000088l40000000 0 0 0 0 8 8 AI5OOOOOOOO0OOO4Al50000000000004 A 0 0 5S 00OOOO 4 ooooooooOOOO2B2200007401000OECl400 150000000004A5OO~ooooOO4AI000OOOOOOOO4A150000000000004A15OOOOOOOOOOOO 0 0 AC2 1O)O0000A2000000A20000o A.AlOOOOO2000000AC210000000000 2 0 9 F2 3oooo 2 0 0 2 0000BF250000ACOOOOOODO2100001500 OOAC21000000000000AC2100002400000 3 0 00000000004Al5OOOOOOOooOooooooO0000O 000000000000000000000000000~kOo Al5OOOOOOOOOOOO4Al5OOOOOOQOOOOO4Al50000 oooooooooooooooooOOOOO4AlSQOOOOOOOOOO 4 300000 00004lOOOOOOD OOOOOOOlOOOOOOOOBE1000 l500004A00000003AOOODA 00 OOl0 0 00OOOOOBE15000000000000l0 0 Q0OQQOOOOoooooooO4AA1500000000000E2 0000000450 0 000000600000000000000000000o000000000~00000000000o000Q0000000o0000000000000000000 Q0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 04A 0 0 0 8 E20000000A20d0000000B4A076800E10000 0 Q 00 0 00 60B041C31EO300009000000088100 0 8 00 4 0 6 0OOAO30000l00OOOO3AQOOOOO562lOOOQOAOOOOOOOOO 2 B2 2000000000000602100002EO000006E 0 00o0OOOOOOO8E2100001COOOOOOFB2l00oO000OOOOO 6800oooOO0000E2100QOOOOOOOOOBEJ5000000000000 0000000 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0000BE150000000000006B2 0 4OOOOOOOOOOODA03000000000000DA03000 3 0000000000EE0300000000000 DA0 9 4 5420 EE0 3 0 0 4 4 8 3 2 O4 E4 4557534C4554544552204953205345 E OODA030000000000000200D900000054 557 2 05 4526F2D1445406523 4E20504C41494E20544558542E20205649 703 A 49 49FE02 841545 44 143484 5442 92 04F5220~ 8 5 44D4C2056455253494F4E20415420687474 2 2 A2A A 2F27777727367072E6726OD22A2A 2 A2 A 2 A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A 2A2A2AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAD 2 A2 A2 A2 A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A2A 5 6 7 248061933332DID01051 OD4 E 65 77206F6E20746865205765620D0D4 3 69 6FE2076FEDA 72 667 56C 2 0 7 06C6 1 6E7320746F206D61726B20746865206F6363617 8/14/2003 file://D:SEARCH_'7-9-03XCEQ048-Lyaa4g003sceq.txt
  11. 11. TEXT. VIEW THE THIS NEWSLETTER IS SENT I I PLAIN HTML VERSION AT FORMATTED VERSION (ATTAC D)OR http://www.sepP.or9 New ont eWeb Earth Day 2003- A Satire it. And I had such wonderful Tuesday, April 22, was Earth Day, and I'missed plans to mark the occasion, too. my roof in the shape of a peace I was going to rearrange the solar pane s on bathe in the same tub full of symbol, and make everyone in our hot sehold it for soup -- reduce, reuse, water, then scoop out a big pot anc boil regurgitate, I always say. in the squirrels in our spruce I was going to implant microchip tran mitters to power the grow lamps trees to harness the energy from their Scampering to while away the afternoon over my organic sprout garden. And I as going CD player. (If you don't know listening to world music on my hand-ckanked herdsman playing the recorder what world music is, think Pemuvjan superimposed over sperm whale mating calls.) spirit, while our children danced I was going to read an ode to Gaia, the Earth from the honeycombs of around holding candles they had formi d themselves the sparrow guano from free-range bees. And I was going to collect fertilizer in our Victory garden -- underneath our winter bird feeders to i:se as modified foods and corporate victory over red-meat consumption, genetically agribusiness, that is! until next Earth Day. I only hope Drat, now all that is going to have to wait forgive me for not buying her my wife -- sorry, co-equal life partnet -- will she's been wanting. those woolen tights and Birkenstock slidas main celebrations won't Thank God -- sorry -- thank goddes}, Edmonton's to handcraft all my presents and take place until May 4. That'll give me time myself with native-berry wrap them (in recycled newspapers I111 decorate paints, of course). best way possible -- by reading Actually, I did commemorate Earth DIay the the notion our current climate is yet another scholarly study that dehuk greenhouse emissions. unusually hot, and getting hotter due 10 manmade Center for Astrophysics, The latest study, from the Harvard Smithsonian
  12. 12. Not So Hot. Co-authored by carries the vernacular title 20th-Century--limate and Willie Soon, Craig ldso and Smithsonian astrophysicists Sallie Baliu as of Carbon Dioxide and Globa Sherwood ldso of the Center for the SIjudy for Climate Research at the Change, and David Legates of the C nter temperatures were generally University of Delaware, it notes: '20th Century cooler than during the medieval warmoth.' environmentalists, was neither The 20th century, contrary to the alarmi m of nor the one marked by the most the warmest century in the past millermn um, faster than ever before, and severe weather. Belief that the globe is warming is the result- of examining so fast that the rise threatens the environment, span. variations in temperature over too short itime 800 to 1300 AD, was as The Medieval Warm Period, from ap oimately nearly as warm as the much as 4 C warmer on average than tod ay, worldwide, for the coming, century. And the upper extreme of U.N. climate projections Greenland sustained agricultural natural world did not implode, far froin it. teemed with fish. Wars were colonies through much of this period. Te seas Middle Ages, in part, because less common in Europe than during th-, later for campaigns of conquest to harvests were plentiful and less pressu4~ existed construction on a grand scale (a acquire new lands and resources. Cath dral Europe. Mesoamerica also sign of relative affluence) boomed across flourished. is the depth of analysis it Remarkable in the Harvard-Srnithson an study and its finding that the Medieval contains of the historical temperature r cord to the North Atlantic region, as Warm Period was global, not merely c nfined some have argued. National (U.S.) Oceanic and The study, funded in part by NASA and the known for their enthusiastic Atmospheric Administration -- two organizations examined the results from more support of the manmade warmring ther -- biological, cultural and than 240 scientific reports on temperature 'proxies," temperatures centuries, millennia geological fingerprints that indirectly ifeveal or even eons, ago. records of temperature and 'For example, tree-ring studies can 3 Jield yearly those variables over longer precipitation trends, while glacier ice brs record glacier advances or retreats, time scales ... Borehole data, cultukal data, sediments, ice cores, peat moss, geomorphology, isotopic analysis frojn lake pollen, can provide clues to past corals, stalagmites and fossils, even hst and climate, even sometimes, very detailefI indicators." wide-ranging as the Harvard- No study to date has been as thoi ough or advantage of the "research Smithsonian study, and few have taken as much
  13. 13. has occurred in recent years. advances in reconstructing ancient clinat 's" that claim temperature Why then, do other scientists and e vironmentalists such potentially catastrophic records of the past century-and-a-half show end of the Medieval Warm warmning? Because the Little Ice Age followed the cold climate was ending Period. This nearly 600-year-period of abnormally were beginning. just as modem, reasonably scientific weather records against which current if 1850 is used as year zero -- as he baseline dramatically warmer today temperatures are compared -- it is goin to look just ending in 1850. But if than a century ago, because the Little Ice Age was or more years are placed 1850 is seen for the anomaly it is, and t e past 1,000 and certainly not cause for in context, then today's heat is hardly th it striking, alarm. ----- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -…--- - - - - - - - April 23, and is reprinted This article appeared in the Edmonton 'ournal, for the Edmonton with permnissionfrom Lorne Gunter, wh is a Columnist National Post. Journal,and an Editorial Board Memb r of the Prime time fiction ab atAlaska Warmning lively fodder not only for The urban legends of global warming i re providing NBC's The West Wing, but also David uzuki By Ross McKitrick FinancialPost (Canada), April 16, 2003 Wing concerns a glacier in One of the current sub-plots in N-BC' The West village. The White House Alaska, which melted and deluged a Downstream of global warming." suddenly found itself dealing with th- "first casualties hydroclimatologist" from the Chief of Staff Leo McGarry sat enthr lled as a " temperatures in Alaska have U.S. Geological Survey told him that mean years, creating unstable lakes soared seven degrees (Fahrenheit) in t ie past 30 villages. that are prone to overflowing, wiping u downstream calling for massive cuts in Last week's show ended with the ad inistration we're to suppose, somehow so-called greenhouse gas emissions. "his would, drama that relishes high- help drowning Alaskans. West Wing is a political tonight we'll see some stakes battles of good-versus-evil, so maybe Republican senator) derail obnoxious, cigar-chomping oil exe utive (or commercial. President Jed Bartlett's idea. Then cut to an SUV
  14. 14. appropriate that it relies on it is a fictional show, of course, so it' only should it surprise us that the fictional issues to captivate the audienc: . Nor from the Geological whole scenario is fictional. If some 'hyd oclimatologist" claimed Alaska had warmed Survey stood in the Chief of Staff's office anid not be to upend the nation's seven degrees in 30 years, the response~ would a phone anid call the Alaska energy policy. The response would be to~pick up have quickly put the Story State Climatologist for confirmation, w o would on ice. it is an urban legend that Alaska has w ed so much, so fast. No matter how most recently in the fevered much the Alaskans try to debunk it, it I yves on, imagination of West Wing scriptwriters. quoting unnamed "federal Last summer, The New York Times r n a story in 30 years. Then it ran sources" that said Alaska had warmed seven degrees apparent indifference to this an editorial denouncing the U.S. gove met's calamity. the paper and gave The Alaskan Climate Research Center .AR)contacted The mean temperature rose it data showing no such warming had t nplace. 1-2000 period. The entire about 2.4F (about 0.4C per decade) n the 197 due to a circulation increase occurred in one jump in 1976-77, probably index formed using data realignment in the Pacific Ocean. A temperature (the "FANB" index) shows, from Fairbanks, Anchorage, Nome, an IBarrow if anything, a slight cooling trend since 1979. for its claim, and it printed a The Times was never able to identify source that if you look in the retraction, sort of. It did find a scientist who figured date you could get a mean right places and pick an earlier start and end In its retraction, the Times' increase of maybe 5.4 degrees over a 31 year span. went up 5.4 degrees, fudged the point a bit, saying Alaska's mean temperature rather than seven, over the past 30 yea s. is still wrong. It posted a map The ACRC responded again saying tht no, this record of all their weather (http://climate.gi.alaska.edu/change) s iowing the text it states: "There stations for the 1971-2000 interval. In the accompanying of Alaska, which reported SF is not a single first-class weather stat. on in all The highest increase, 4.2 temperature increase for the last thr e decades." was at nearby Kotzebue. degrees, was at Barrow. One of the lo, vest (1.7F7) on the West Wing, The Times dropped the story, but it ias now resurfaced run with it for a few weeks, where earnest White House staffers wI no doubt a few thousand jobs in oil- hoping to bludgeon the oil industr and kill moved past this plot line, the producing states like, say, Alaska. 0nce they've see-erewrnn-n3-er laim will surely pop up again
  15. 15. Wing. somewhere, but hopefully not in the ral West on TV recently. The That wasn't the only bit of global wa ming fiction TVOntario interviewed same night as the fictional glacieri melted, 2. Apparently some David Suzuki on its current affairs show, Studio Foundation, have put out a scientists, sponsored in part by the Davi I Suzuki Lakes to boil dry, or report arguing that global warming will Lause the Great from now. Ho-hum yet overflow, or do something or other a fw decades on like a secular Left another apocalyptic enviro-scare: It's staring to drag Behind series. I didn't watch much of the interview, but what caught my attention was Mr. London, Ontario, winter Suzuki's claim that when he was a boy oing up in warmed up so much winter used to set in at the end of October, but now it's not the ups and downs, but arrives a lot later. Global warming, you see. It's these rapid warming trends we need to worry about. Sotenx a okdu h eprtuercrsfrtewahrsaina Second World War, but London's airport. The data are spotty prior to the I'm guessing at Dr. S's there's a continuous record after 1940, crding at 1990. vintage but I figure this is early enough.~ averaged temperature data I don't think much of running trend lins through gets framed. the debate often as a way of measuring "climate," but th s is how temperature in London fell And it shows the October-November average per decade. "Fell," as in from 1940 to 1990 at a rate of -0.2 de Yrees Celsius colder, on average, than when cooling. As in, October and November ae now The annual average also Mr. Suzuki was a lad awaiting wintej in London. shows cooling, at about 0.1I degrees C er decade. after 1990, at least not at Unfortunately the temperature data ar( not posted looking collection where I was the NASA (http://www.giss.nasa.gov/dataupdat istemp/station-data). But across the continues to post its data. lake at Erie, Penn., there is a weather~ station that fell by 0.26 degrees C per The October-November temperature avierage there average fell by about 0.13 decade from 1940 to 2001 (see chart). The annual words the area has gotten degrees C per decade from 1940 to 2001. In other colder, not warmer. Canada no longer gives Incidentally, it is a real annoyance tht Environment stations reporting weather its temperature data away. Almost all Lhe Canadian 9 0 numbers for free use into the NASA database stopped releasing the post-19 This is a government that by the public. You are expected to p y for it now. climate change initiatives, brags about spending billions of dollars on budget for its so-called including $350-million in the most recent
  16. 16. fund, not to mention tens of 'Sustainable Development Technology" slush and however many hundreds of millions for the Climate Change Action und, on TV telling people that sealing thousands to put those asinine commerci is stop global warming. Yet it their windows and turning down the h atwill the basic data that would allow won't spend the money to make availa le local temperatures. Makes you people to see long term, up-to-date recoids of wonder what it doesn't want people to kn w. been out of the public eye for a Global warming and Kyoto have, merci ally, the issue in the first place while. Some commentators who never grasped the anti-Kyoto concerns were all have triumphantly used this as evidence hat in Canada because the feds have overblown. In reality, the story is quiet Here Kyoto. How that came about all but abandoned any intention of imple menting warmers are still sore about is a story for another day. Stateside, the global the groundwork for a new Bush's decision to reject Kyoto, and ae laying that Kyoto would somehow political push to bring it back. Since te idea it is only fitting that the benefit the global climate was always a fiction, entertainment industry is taking the lead economics at the University of Ross McKitrick is an associate profes or of Troubled Science, Policy and Guelph, and coauthor of Taken By Stoim The A big seller in Politics of Global Warming (www.takenbystormi.info). short listed for the Canadian Canada and up for 'a Donner Prize, it is also Science Writers Association award.
  17. 17. by The Week That Was (May 3. 2003) brought to you SEPP ABOUT GLOBAL 1. New on the Web: A DOUBLE FEATURE satire of Earth Day and WARMING FROM CANADA: born( Gunter's "West Wing," and David Ross McKitrick's skewering of the NY Times, Suzuki. http:f/www.sepp.orgfNewSEPPffiarhDa Gunter.html http://www.sepp.org/NewSEPP/PrimeTi eAlaska-McKitrick.htmfl 2. CANADA'S OIL SANDS ERVES APPRAISED AT 180 cover all US oil imports for BILLION BARRELS: That's sufficient to 45 years. NEW STUDY 3. DEBATE ABOUT NATURAL GAS RESERVES: CLAIMS AT LEAST 65-YEAR SUM LY GAS WON'T BE 4. DEBATE ABOUT NATURAL GA RESERVES: CHEAP RISK HIGHER AT 5. DEBATE ABOUT PLUTONIUM: CANCER ROCKY FLATS PLANT? 6. DEBATE ABOVE PLUTONIUM - CONTINUED IN THE DARK: Won't 7. SWEDEN PREFERS NOT TO F EEZE close nuclear reactor 180 billion barrels by Oil 2. Canada's Oil sands reserves appraised at and Gas Journal. 4.9 to 180 billion barrels this Estimates of Canada's oil reserves jum.)ed from the world, acc. to an annual year, making it the second-largest oil reserve in resource had been known for survey by the authoritative O&GJ. ) hile the recoverable and therefore some time, it has now become ec nomically included as "reserves." with sand and clay. Hot The Alberta oil sands contain tar-like bitumen mixed to technology advances that water is used to separate the bitumen. Thanks costs are now estimated lower the transportation cost of the sa ids, production at around $8 a barrel. Protocol, the outlook is But because of Canada's adherence :o the Kyoto investment and cloudy. Koch Industries has withdran from a C$.5-bIion
  18. 18. plan. [Financial Post Petro-Canada is reconsidering its C$ 5.2-billion plans to do after 2012 4/29/03]. There is great concern about hat Ottawa has offered no guarantees, in follow-ups to Kyoto. The federal gov mnment to costs. so uncertainty is discouraging investments and adding "Oilsands' promise may A May 02, 2003 National Post article titled, too expensive to produce" evaporate: This fabled lode of wealth is tecomning off on their oilsands described how many companies are drop ing or holding some are citing developments. Most are citing Kyoto-re ated uncertainties, but either way, the increasing costs from numerous comp eting projects, number of active oilsands projects is dwindling. for lowering production On the other hand, there are technologic 1prospects developer of the highly costs. Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the the "Slowpoke" successful CANDU nuclear reactor, has long espoused water rather than steam concept, a 10 NM (thermal) reactor that supplies hot (using enniched for electric power generation. The Advanced CANDU cooling) can be built with uranium, heavy water moderation, but light water might be the ideal energy a cost saving of 40%, being physically mler. It Canadian tar sands. source for the hot water needed for prod icing oil from year, much of it from With US oil imports now at 4 billior barrels per in seeing to it that the unstable sources, there should be consi erable interest goes along with Canada Canadian oil reserves can be develope. If the US natural gas through the in supporting the single pipeline fol Alaskan will save billions for US MacKenzie Delta, a deal could be tade that situation. It may have to taxpayers and make Canadians richer -a win-win - perhaps in 2004. wait until the Chretien government dep; Lts from Ottawa says that the levels of 3. A new survey by the Potential G sCommittee 1 natural gas are larger than previous y thought. the natural gas industry, The committee, made up of represen atives from that 1,311 trillion cubic government agencies and academic in titutions, says end of 2002 in the United feet (Tcf) in natural gas resources exis ed as of the natural gas at current rates States. That's the equivalent of a 65-ye supply of since the committee's of consumption. The size of the base actually increased gas has been withdrawn. last report in 2000, even though 39 Tci of natural greater use of natural "It makes no sense for laws and regul tions to promote and environmental reasons, gas for increased national energy ind pendence the ability of natural while at the same time conflicting re uations hamper t meet this growing gas producers to bring enough su l to maken
  19. 19. demand,' says David Parker, CEO of the kmerican Gas Association. volatility, he adds. The mismatch between supply and dem ndcreates price operations to That hurts all users from apartment dwellers to industrial an energy bill electric generators. The time is right for lawmakers to adopt of natural that considers the projected demand and environmental benefits gas, as well as the new technologies that make drilling less invasive, Parker says. such studies are Opponents of new exploration, howe er, contend that suspect. Resource generally industry financed and the res lts are therefore would be levels are exaggerated, which means that added dnilling 2025, they environmentally harmful. Supplies ae adequate through say-enough time to develop alternative energy sources. measure to allow The debate rages in Congress. The H se has passed a the Senate has drilling in the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) but in any Conference voted nay, although the item could get pushed through lawmakers have Committee bill that reconciles the two versions. Republican to promote said that they might agree to suppor government mandates on ANWR. The renewable energy if Senate Democrats would give in at 35 Tcf (and Administration estimates natural-gas reserves from ANWR perhaps up to 100 Tcf from the North SI )pe). (From Issue Alert by Ken Silverstein) 4. Gas won't be cheap it is perceived We have turned as a country to natural as in a big way because upon it, it is as clean, cheap, and ample. Now, as we become dependent noticeable the neither inexpensive nor abundant. It will become especially next time there is a shortage of power in this country, as we try to turn on shortage of gas to more gas-power generation at the same time there exist a a very cheap store away for winter season. At that point, $5 gas will become this coming memory. We are also headed for a otential major shortage trends. winter, if the weather patterns merely a proximate historical to be balanced in However, as you might expect, I take issue with your attempt refer to depletion your approach to the subject. .first, sorne housekeeping: You meant decline rates. rates of 29% for existing supplies. I am quite sure you through a given Depletion refers to the amount by whi h reserves are reduced anywhere near that amount of production, and we are no losing reserves at production from a rate. Decline rates refer to the amoun by which periodic
  20. 20. wells are given well or set of wells decreases from one period to the next. New declining by about 29%, and the rate is h adng north of 30% quickly. gas. The Second, the ANWR debate has very little to do with the natural decision to bring natural gas down from Alaska and/or Canada's MacKenzie gas from Delta is a separate issue with opening ANWR. We could pipe natural Alaska for years without having to even consider ANWR as a possible source. ANWR is mostly about oil. of You mentioned that Canada has made ip the difference in our shortfall natural gas production until now, but you failed (probably for lack of space) to at a time mention that Canadian production is sta ing to fall off also. Comning also have when our own production has fallen, this is doubly bad. You might U.S., a mentioned that Mexico is starting to im ort more natural gas from the trend that should continue unless the U.S. is opened up to more exploration. supply do You also neglected to mention that these studies showing a 65+ year estimates. virtually nothing to consider commercial viability for much of those such as You and I may have some deposits in our back yard, and deposits those are figured into these estimates (f gross availability. But they are no coast of more accessible under today's environm nt than gas deposits off the Florida. And to include them into reser e estimates is to do a great disservice to the debate over making restricted area accessible. evil have People who continue to claim that drlling is environmentally as watched the movie 'Giant' one too m ny times. Such efficient advances with the directional drilling have greatly impr ved the productivity along It clean activity of newer wells, a fact that is inconvenient for the "greens". many of will take a lot of effort to get the enviro mentalists to accept this, and the current generation never will, since reality threatens their raison d'etre. expand You say some environmentalists are supportive of our need to to close exploration and drilling efforts. The f et is it only takes one group asset base. down, or greatly impede, any effort to expand our hydrocarbon drilling Various groups have successfully blocked numerous efforts to expand into areas that should be producing no. of higher We have already lost a huge amount of industry in the US because gas has gas prices, as evidenced by the fact hat industrial use of natural Even dropped from 17.2 Bcf/day in 2000 to n estimated 7.2 Bcf/day in 2003. with that decline, we run a very real risk of entering this next winter without enough gas to last the heating season at any cost. James R. Halloran Energy Analyst, National City Bank
  21. 21. 5. Cancer Risk Higher At Rocky Flats Plant (By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (AP) - and Rocky Flats employees who assembled nuclear weapons components a new study inhaled radioactive particles had an incre sed risk of lung cancer, plutonium found. The $2.5 million study found th workers who dealt with workers who were about two times more likely to deN elop lung cancer than Health were not exposed. The study was done bythe University of Colorado Health and Sciences Center and the Colorado Department of Public Environment. with 720 Researchers compared 180 former workc rs who died of lung cancer lung cancer other workers who were considered hea thy. Those who died of Ruttenber, had higher levels of radiation exposure1 on average. Dr. James in the who led the study, said the research offers the first concrete information "We have United States that lung cancer is linked to plutonium ingestion. support supporting evidence from other studies tat, along with our findings, said. the hypothesis that plutonium exposure causes lung cancer,' Ruttenber for handling He said researchers will study the data t determine if standards said. "We plutonium should be changed. "One ca e study is not enough," he need to make sure that we > have robu t findings before we make sweeping changes." factors Doug Benevento, director of the state health department, said other to put it into have been shown to cause more of a ris of cancer. "You have cancer," context: If you smoke, you're seven tin es as likely to develop lung cancers to he said. He also said the study did nol definitively link worker's to their employment at the plant, noting other factors, such as exposure explain the chemicals at home, lifestyle differenc s or pure chance could elevated risk results. for 26 years, Arvada resident Wally Gulden, 65, wh worked at Rocky Flats said he wasn't surprised by the finding; or satisfied with the study. "There that were are more of us out there with cance s not related to the ones studied," said Gulden, who has non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. "I worked in a hot to my spot and I know I ingested plutonium, and I want to know if it's related work." Gulden has filed a claim under the Radiation Exposure Compensation and other Act program, which compensates Pe( ple suffering from cancer projects. "I illnesses as a result of their work on Cold War-era weapons hoped for more answers, but there aren't any," Gulden said. The lung cancer findings were part 4' a broader study that tracked 16,303 study also people who worked at the plant between 1952 and 1989. The
  22. 22. found that Rocky Flats workers were 2.5 times more likely to develop brain tumors than other people. Researches pla to examine those findings further. Rocky Flats manufactured plutonium trgesfor nuclear warheads for almost 40 years. It closed in 1989 because of Eafety and environmental problems. The site is being cleaned up and will become a wildlife refuge. The study was funded by the National Institute for Cccupational Safety and Health On the Net: Rocky Flats workers study: http://lwww.cdphe.state.co.us/rf/rfpworke studylindexhtml 6. Myth: Plutonium is one of the moit dangerous poisons known -- But Reality: Three studies in report, "Toxicological Profile for Plutonium," prepared for and issued by Agency orToxic Substances and Disease Registry, Centers for Disease Control, A lanta, Georgia, in collaboration with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, December 1990, show just the opposite: **A 37-year study(as of 1990, the year of this report) of 26 plutonium workers at Los Alamos laboratory du ing World War II with plutonium of deposition ranging from 2,000 to 95,000 picocuries plutonium with a mean of 26,000 picocuries showed mortality of 2.0 vs. 6.6 in a comparable number the general population. In addition, no malignant neoplasms have occurred in this group during this extensive follow-up. **Study begun in 1974 of an additio a] 224 Los Alamos workers with 43 average whole body deposition of 19,000 picocuries plutonium showed deaths compared to 77 in a comparable number of the general population. The number of deaths due to malignant ieoplasms was 8 vs. 15 in the general population, including only one lung cancer vs. five in the general population. **Study of 7,112 workers employed tthe Rocky Flats plutonium facility during 1952-1979 showed comparable results. Observed deaths of workers were significantly less than those incomparable numbers of general populations (452 vs. 831). Malignant n oplasms were also less (107 vs. 167). By Clinton Bastin <clintonbastin~email.mnsn.com> 7. Sweden changes its mind: Won't, -lose nuclear reactor
  23. 23. from 7. The socialist-democratic government (with support from the Left and Center parties) has decided not to close jirsebeck 2 in 2003, as originally cold planned. It could not guarantee adequ Lcy of supply during extreme weather. Sweden obtains half its electric lower from nuclear reactors.

×