RCEC Email 5.30.03

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Reconstructing Climatic and Environmental Changes"
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Email 5.30.03

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RCEC Email 5.30.03

  1. 1. Page 1 of 13 RECORD TYPE: FEDERAL (NOTES MAIL) ALI 7 CREATOR:Richard Seibert <rseibert~annctr.org> ( Richard Seibert <rseibert~annctr.org CREATION DATB/TIME:30-MAY-2003 11:02:1!.00 SUBJECT: : 20th Century Climate Not So aot TO:kbailey~ceq.eop.gov ( kbailey~ceg.ecp.gav UNKNOWN READ: UNKNOWN TO:dfiffelke~ceq.eop~gov ( dfiffelke~c qeop.gov [ UNKNOWN I READ :UNKNOWN TO:Phil Cooney ( CN=Phil Caoney/OU=CEQ/ =EOP@EOP [ CEQ READ :UNKNOWN TO:Elizabeth A. Stolpe ( CN=Elizabeth A. Stolpe/OU=CEQ/O=EOP@EOP[ CEQ READ :UNKNOWN TO:vastephens~ceq.eop.gov ( vastephens@ eq.eop.gov[ UNKNOWN READ 'UNKNOWN TEXT: Harvard-Smnithsonian Center for Astraphy ics Press Release <http: //cfa-www.harvard.edu/> <http: //cfa-www.harvard.edu,'newtap/sear h.html> <http: //cfa-www.harvard.edu/newtop/cfah lp.html> Release No. : 03-10 For Release: March 31, 2003 20th Century Climate Nat So flat Cambridge, MA - A review of mare than 200 climate studies led by researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has determined that the 20th century is nei her the warmest century nor the century with the most extreme weather af the past 1000 years. The review also confirmed that the medieval Warm P niod of 800 to 1300 A.D. and the Little Ice Age of 1300 to 1900 A.D. were worldwide phenomena not limited to the European and North American continents. While 20th century temperatures are much higher than in thE Little Ice Age period, many parts of the world show the medieval wa mth to be greater than that of the 20th century. Smithsonian astronomers Willie Soon and Sallie Baliunas, with co-authors Craig Idso and Sherwood Idso (Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change) and David Legates (Center for Climatic Research, University of Delaware), compiled and e amined results from more than 240 research papers published by thousands of researchers aver the past four decades. Their report, covering a multitude of geophysical and biological climate indicators, provides a detailed look at climate changes that occurred in different regi ns around the world over the last 1000 years. 'Many true research advances in reconstructing ancient climates have occurred over the past two decades," Soon says, "so we felt it was time to pull together a large sample of recent studies from the last 5-10 years and look for patterns of variabili y and change. In fact, clear patterns did emerge showing that regions worldwide experienced the highs file:/D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQO61 zggO ceq.txt 8/14/2003
  2. 2. Page 2 of 13 of the Medieval Warm Period and lows oi the Little Ice Age, and that 20th century temperatures are generally cooler than during the medieval warmth." Soon and his colleagues concluded that the 20th century is neither the warmest century over the last 1000 yea s, nor is it the most extreme. Their findings about the pattern of historical climate variations will help make computer climate models simu ate both natural and man-made changes more accurately, and lead to b tter climate forecasts especially on local and regional levels. This is Especially true in simulations on timescales ranging from several decades to a century. Historical Cold, Warm Periods Verified Studying climate change is challenging for a number of reasons, not the least of which is the bewildering variety of climate indicators - all sensitive to different climatic variables, and each operating on slightly overlapping yet distinct scales of space and time. For example, tree ring studies can yield yearly records of temperature and precipitation trends, while glacier ice cores record those variables over longer time scales of several decades to a century. Soon, Baliunas and colleagues analyzed aumerous climate indicators including: borehole data; cultural data; glacier advances or retreats; geomorphology; isotopic analysis from 1ake sediments or ice cores, tree or peat celluloses (carbohydrates), corals, stalagmite or biological fossils; net ice accumulation rate, including dust or chemical counts; lake fossils and sediments; river sedim nts; melt layers in ice cores; phenological (recurring natural phenome a in relation to climate) and paleontological fossils; pollen; seafloor sediments; luminescent analysis; tree ring growth, including e ther ring width or maximum late-wood density; and shifting tree li e positions plus tree stumps in lakes, marshes and streams. 'Like forensic detectives, we assembled these series of clues in order to answer a specific question about loc 1 and regional climate change: is there evidence for notable climatic anomalies during particular time periods over the past 1000 years?" Soon says. "The cumulative evidence showed that such anomalies did exist." The worldwide range of climate records confirmed two significant climate periods in the last thousand years, the Little Ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period. The climatic notion of a Little Ice Age interval from 1300 tol900 A.D, and a medieval Warm Period from 800 to 1300 A.D. appears to be rather well-confirmed and wide-sprea , despite some differences from one region to another as measured by ot er climatic variables like precipitation, drought cycles, or glaci r advances and retreats. "For a long time, researchers have possessed anecdotal evidence supporting the existence of these clinate extremes," Baliunas says. "For example, the Vikings established coloni s in Greenland at the beginning of the second millennium that died out several hundred years later when the climate turned colder. And in Engla d, vineyards had flourished during the medieval warmth. Now, we haye an accumulation of objective data to back up these cultural indicators." The different indicators provided clear evidence for a warm period in the Middle Ages. Tree ring summer temperatures showed a warm interval from 950 A.D. to 1100 A.D. in the northern high latitude zones, which corresponds to the 'Medieval Warm Period.", Another database of tree growth from 14 different locations over 30-70 degrees north latitude showed a similar early warm period. many parts of the world show the medieval warmth to be greater than that of the 20th century. The study - funded by NASA, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad inistration, and the American Petroleum Institute - will be published in the Energy and Environment journal. A shorter paper by Soon and Baliunas appeared in the January 31, 2003 issue of the Climate Research journal. file://D:SEARCH_7-9_03-CEQ061_f~yzgtgooI seq.txt 8/14/2003
  3. 3. Page 3 of 13 NOTE TO EDITORS: Photos of key climate indicators are available online at http: /!cfa-www.harvard.edu/presg/pr(310image.html Headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) is a Ja!rt collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical observatory End the Harvard College Observatory. CfA scientists organized into six research divisions study the origin, evolution, and ultimate~ fate of the universe. For more information, contact: David Aguilar, Director of Public Affairs Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astroph sics Phone: 617-495-7462 Fax: 617-495-7468 daguilar~cfa .harvard. edu Christine Lafon Public Affairs Specialist Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Phone: 617-495-7463, Fax: 617-495-7016 clafon~cfa .harvard. edu Last modified on Monday, 31-Mar-2003 15:18:29 EST Comments or Questions? Contact pubaffairs~cfa.harvard.edu - attl.htm - imageQO1.gif - image002.gif - image003.gif- image004.gif- image~Os.g ATT CREATION TIME/DATE: 0 00:00:00.00 TEXT: <IDOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//w3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> <html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-co :vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-co m:office:office" xmlns:w="urn: schemas-microsoft-com:office:worarr xmlns:stl="urn :schemas-microsoft--com:office:smarttags' xmlns="http://www.w3 .org/TR/REC-html4O 'F> <head> <META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Tye" CONTENT= "text/html; charset=us-ascii"> <meta name=Progld content=Word. Document: <meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 10"> <meta name=Originator content="Microsofi Word 10"> <base href="http://cfa-www.harvard~edu/ ~ress/pr0310.html"> <link rel=File-List href="cid:fi lelist. ,,lc?0C3269A.683D6920"> <link rel=Edit-Time-Data href="cid:edit lata.mso@01C3269A.683D6920"> <!--[if !mso)> <style> v:* {behavior:url(#default#VML) ;} o:* (behavior:url(#default#VyM) ;} w:t (behavior:url(#default#VML) hi *..shape {behavior:url (#default#VML) ; </style> <I [endif]--> <title>Message</title> <o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schem s-microsoft-com:office: smarttags" name="time" /> <o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schem s-microsoft-com:office:smarttags'I name="`PlaceName" /> <o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schemes-microsoft-com:off ice: smarttags" name=" PlaceType"`/> <o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schemzs-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" name="City"/> <o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schem es-microsoft-com:off ice: smarttags" name=" State"`/> <o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schem s-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" name=`"date" /> file://D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQ061 .fyzgtgoo3_seq~txt 8/14/2003
  4. 4. Page 4 of 13 <o:SmartTagType namespaceuri="urn:schenas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" name="place"/> <o:SmartTagmype namespaceuri="urn: sche as-microsofl±-com:off ice: smarttags" name="country-region" /> <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o: OfficeflocumentSettings> <0o:DoNotRelyOnCSS/> </0: OfficeDocumentSettings> </xmnl><![endif]--><l--[if gte mso 9><xm1> <wWordDocument> <w:SpellingState>Clean</w:SpellingState> <w: GrammarState>Clean</w: GrammarState> <W: DocumtentKind>DocumentEmail</w: Docu entKind> <w:EnvelopeVis/> <w: BrowserLevel>Microsoft~nternetExpl rer4</1w: BrowserLevel> <1w: WordDocument> </xml>cI [endif)---><!--[if Imso]> <style> stl: *{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) I </style> <! [endif]--> <style> /* Style Definitions * p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.NsoNormal (mso-style-parent:"'' margin: Oin; margin-bottom: .OO0lpt; mso-pagination :widow-orphan; font-size:12. Opt; font-family: 'Times New Roman"; 1 mso-fareast-font-family: "Times 4ew Roman" ;) h2 (mso-margin-top-alt :auto; margin-right:OQin; mso-margin-bottom-alt :auto; margin-left:OQin; mso-pagination :widow-orphan; mso-outline-level :2; font-size:18. Opt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; font-weight :bold;) a: link, span. msol-yperlink (color:#6B4226; text-decoration: underline; text-underline: single;) a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:#6B4226; text-decoration :underline; text-underline :single;}I p {mso-margin-top-alt :auto; margin-right: Oin; mso-margin-bottom-alt :auto; margin-left: Oin; mso-pagination :widow-orphan; font-size:12. Opt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";) span.FEmailStylel8 file://D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQO61LLyzgtgOO3 seq.txt 8/14/2003
  5. 5. Page 5 of 13 {mso-style-type :personal-reply; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-ansi-font-size: 12. Opt; mso-bidi-font-size:12. Opt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-hansi-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-font-family: "Times New Roman"; color :blue; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal; text-decoration: none; text-underline :none; text-decoration: none; text-line-through:none; I @page Sectionl {size:8.5in 11.Oin; margin:1.Oin l.2Sin 1.Oin 1.251i mso-header-margin:.-5in; mso-footer-margin:.5Sin; mso-paper-source:0;) div. Sectionl {page:Sectionl; I </style> <!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions * table. MSONormalTable {mso-style-name: "Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:"" mso-padding-alt:Qin 5.4pt Oin 5 4pt; mso-para-margin:OQin; mso-para-margin-bottom: .OO0lpt; mso-pagination :widow-orphan; font-size:10. Opt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9I><xml> <o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax= '1026" /> </xml><cdendif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xm1> 'co:shapelayout v:ext="~edit"I> <o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="l" /> </o:shapelayout></xmnl>c! [endif] -- > </head> <body bgcolor=white lang=EN-TJS link="#6.4226" vlink="#6B4226" style='tab-interv al: *.5ih'> <div class=Sectionl> <p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face='T-mes New Roman"><span style=' font-size: 12 .Opt'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font> /p> <div align=center> file://D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQO61LfyzgtgO(3sceq.txt 8/14/2003
  6. 6. Page 6 of 13 <table class=NsoNormalTable border=0 ce lpadding=0 width=600 style='width:6.25i n; mso-cellspacing:1. 5pt'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-la-trow:yes'> <td width=75 valign=top, style='width: 6.25pt;padding: .75pt .75pt ..75pt .75pt 1> <p class=MsoNorrnal align=center style= text-align:center'><tont size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style=' f nt-size:12 .Opt'><img width=33 height=38 id=" _xOOOO_11026" src="cid: mageOOl.gif@01IC3269A.683D6920"1 alt="Harvard Shield"><img width=42 he ght=39 id=" _xOOOO_11027" src="cid:image002.gif@01C3269A.683D69 0" alt="Smithsonian Sunburst"I><o:p></o: p></span></font></p> <td width=420 style='width:315.Opt;pa lding:.75pt .75pt .75pt ..75pt'> <p class=MsoNorrnal><stl place><stl:P1 iceName><font size=2 color=darkred face="Times New Roman"><span style= font-size:l0.Opt;color:darkred'>Harvard -Smithsonian</span></font></stl:PlaceNa e><foant size=2 color=darkred><span style=' fo it-size:10.Opt;color:darkred'> </span></ font><stl:PlaceType><foant size=2 color=darkred><span style=' f nt-size:l0.Opt;color:darkred'>Center</s pan></font></stl:PlaceType></stl:place> ,font size=2 color=darkred><span style='fon -size:l0.Opt;color:darkred'> for AStrophysics<br> </span></font><b><font size=5 color=dirkred><span style= 'font-size:18.Opt; color:darkred;font-weight:bold'>Press Release </span></font></b><o:p></o:p></ <I td> </table> <I div> <p class=MsoNormal align=center style=' ext-align:center'><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style=' fan:-size:12.Opt;display:rnone;mso-hide: all'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p- <div align-center> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 ce lspacing=0 cellpadding=0 width=620 style='width:465.Opt;mso-cellspacing:0 n;mso-padding-alt:Oifl Oin Oin Oin'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-la trow:yes'> <td style='padding:Oin Oin Oin Oin'> <p class=MsoNormal align=center style 'text-align:center'>•font size=3 face="Tirnes New Roman"><span style='f nt-size:12.Opt'><img width-333 height=25 id=" _xOOOO_1i1028" src="cid: rnageOO3.gif@01C3269A.683D6920" alt="`Cred bar]" border=0><a href="htt ://cfa-www.harvard.edu/"><span style= 'text-decoration:none;text-unde line:none' ><img border=0 width=70 height=25 id=" _xOOOO_±i1029" src="cid: mageOO4.gif@01IC3269A.683D6920" alt=" [CfA Home]" align=top></span></a <a href="http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/newt p/search.htrnl"><span style= 'text-decora tion: none;text-underline:hone'><img borderz0 width=81 height=25 id=" _xOOOO_1030" src="cid:image005.gif@01C3269A.683D69 0" alt=" [CfA Search] " aligrn=top></spa n>< /a><a href="http: //cfa-www.harvard.edu/newt p/cfahelp.html"><span style=' text-decor ation: none;text-underline:none' ><img border=0 width=90 height=25 id=" _xOOOO_11031" file://D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQO61_fyzgtgO 13-eq.txt 8/14/2003
  7. 7. Page 7 of 13 src='cid:imageo06.gif@01C3269A.683D69 0' alt=" [CfA Help]l align=top></span> </a><o:p></o:p></span></font></p> <Itr> <I/table> <p class=MsoNormal align=center style=' ext-align:center'><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style=' ton -size:12 .Opt;display:none;mso-hide: all'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></font></p> <div align=center> <table class=MsoNormalTable border=0 ce lpadding=0 width=600 style='width:6.25i mso-cellspacing:l. 5pt'> <tr style='mso-yfti-irow:0;mso-yfti-la trow:yesl> <td valign=top style='padding:.75pt .75pt .75pt .75pt'> <p class=MsoNormal><b><foflt size=3 fa e="Times New Roman">cspan style='font-size:12 .Opt;font-weight:b ld'>Release No.: 03-l0<br> For Release: </span></font></b>'cstl:dite Month="13' Day="131"1 Year="20031><b><s pan style='font-weight:bold'>March 31, 2 03</span></b></stl:date><b><span style=' font-weight:bold'> </span></b> o:p></o:p></p> <h2 align=center style='text-align:ceater'><b><font size=5 face='Times New Roman"><span style='f nt-size:l8.Opt'>20th Century Climate Not So Hot <o:p></o:p></span></font></b></h2> <p><stl:place><stl:City><font size=3 Eace="Times New Roman"><span style=' font-size:12 .Opt'>Cambridge</span></font></stl:City>, <stl:State>MA< /stl:State></stl :place> - A review of more than 200 climate studies led by researchers at the <stl:pl ace><stl: PlaceName>Harvard-Smithsoniafl</stl: PlaceName> <stl :PlaceType>Center</stl :PlaceType></stl :place> for Astrophysics has determined that the 20th century is neither the warmest century nor the century with the most extreme weather of the past 1000 years. The review also confirmed that the Medieval Warm Peniod of 800 to 1300 A.D. and the Little Ice Age of 1300 to 1900 A.D. were worldwide phenomena not limited to the European and North American continent . While 20th century temperatures are much higher than in the Little Ice Age period, many parts of the world show the medieval warmth to be greater than that of the 20th century. <o:p></o:p>< <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style= font-size:12 .Opt'>Smithso nian astronomers Willie Soon and Sallie Baliunas, with co-authors Craig Idso and Sherwood Idso (Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change) and David Legates (Center for Climatic Research, University of Delaware), compiled and examined results from more than 240 research papers published by thousands of researchers over the past four decades. Their report, covering a multitude of geophysical and biological climate indicators, provides a detailed look at climate changes that occurred in different regions around the world over the last 1000 years. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roma "><span style=' font-size:12.Opt'>&quot;M any true research advances in reconstructing ancient climates have occurred over file:/D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQO61L~yzgtgO 3seq.txt 8/14/2003
  8. 8. Page 8 of 13 the past two decades,&guot; Soon says &quot;so we felt it was time to pull together a large sample of recent stulies from the last 5-10 years and look for patterns of variability and chang . In fact, clear patterns did emerge sh owing that regions worldwide experienced th highs of the Medieval Warm Period and lows of the Little Ice Age, and that 0Oth century temperatures are generally cooler than during the medieval warmt1.&qUot; <o:p></o:p><c/span></font></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman '><span style=' font-size:12 .Opt'>Soon and his colleagues concluded that the 20th century is neither the warmest century over the last 1000 years, nor is it the most extreme. Their findings about the pattern of historical china e variations will help make computer climate models simulate both natural ind man-made changes more accurately, and lead to better climate forecasts Especially on local and regional levels. This is especially true in simulation on timescales ranging from several decades to a century. <o:p></o:p>'c/span><c/font></p> <p><u><cfont size=3 face="Times New Rb an'><span style='font-size:l2.0pt'>H~it orical Cold, Warm Periods Verified</span></f nt><c/u> <o:p></o:P></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:12.Opt >Studyin g climate change is challenging for a nimber of reasons, not the least of which is the bewildering variety of climate indicators - all sensitive to different climatic variables, and each operatin on slightly overlapping yet distinct scales of space and time. For example, tree ring studies can yield yearly records of temperature and precipitation trends, while glacier ice cores record those variables over longer tine scales of several decades to a century. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p> <p><font size=3 face='Times New Roman"><span style=' font-size:12 .Opt'>Soon, Baliunas and colleagues analyzed numerous climate indicators including: borehole data; cultural data; glacier advances or retreats; geomorphology; isotopic analysis from lake sediments or ice cores, tree or peat celluloses (carbohydrates), corals, stalagmite or biological fossils; net ice accumulation rate, including dust or chemical counts; lake fossils and sediments; river sediments; melt layers in ice cores; phenological (recurring natural phenomena in relation to cli ate) and paleontological fossils; pollen; seafloor sediments; luminesc nt analysis; tree ring growth, including either ring width or maximum late-wocd density; and shifting tree line positions plus tree stumps in lakes, marshes and streams. <o:p></o:p></span>< /font></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roma '><span style='font-size:12.Optl>&:quot;L ike forensic detectives, we assembled th se series of clues in order to answer a specific question about local and recional climate change: Is there evidence for notable climatic anomalies durnn particular time periods over the past 1000 years?&qubt; Soon says. &quot;Tle cumulative evidence showed that such anomalies did exist.&quot; <o:p></o:j></span></font></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Romai '><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>The worldwide range of climate records c nfirmed two significant climate periods in the last thousand years, the Litt .e ice Age and the Medieval Warm Period. file:/D:SEARCHJ79.0OtCEQ06 1_fLyzgtgO 3sceq.txt 8/14/2003
  9. 9. Page 9 of 13 The climatic notion of a Little Ice A e interval from 1300 tol900 A.D. and a Medieval Warm Period from 800 to 1300 A.D. appears to be rather well-confirmed and wide-spread. despi e some differences from one region to another as measured by other climatic variables like precipitation, drought cycles, or glacier advances and retre ts. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman'><span style=' font-size:12 .Opt'>&quot;F or a long time, researchers have possess d anecdotal evidence supporting the existence of these climate extremes,&Iuot; Baliunas says. &quot;For example, the Vikings established colonies in < span></font><stl:place>Greenland</stl:p lace> at the beginning of the second millen ium that died out several hundred years later when the climate turned colder. And in <stl:country.-region><stl:place>E ngland</stl :place></stl :country-region> vineyards had flourished during the m dieval warmth. Now, we have an accumulation of objective data to back up these cultural indicators.&quot; <o <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman '><span style= font-size:l2 .Opt'>The different indicators provided clear eridence for a warm period in the middle Ages. Tree ring summer temperatures slowed a warm interval from 950 A.D. to 1100 A.D. in the northern high latitule zones, which corresponds to the &quot;Medieval Warm Period.&quot; Ano her database of tree growth from 14 different locations over 30-70 degree; north latitude showed a similar early warm period. Many parts of the world 3how the medieval warmth to be greater than that of the 20th century. <o:p></o:p></span></font></p> <p><font size=3 face='Times New Roman'><span style=1font-size:12 .Opt'>The study - funded by NASA, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admi istration, and the American Petroleum Institute - will be published in the Vnergy and Environment journal. A shorter paper by Soon and Baliunas ap eared in the </span></font><stl:date Month="l' Day=1311 Year="2003'1>Januar 31, 2003</stl:date> issue of the Climate Research journal. <o:p></o:p> /p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman '><span style=1font-size:l2 .Opt'>N0TE TO EDITORS: Photos of key climate indica ors are available online at <a href="http: //cfa-www.harvard.edu/pres /pro3lOimage.html">http://cfa-www. .harv ard. edu/press/pro3l~image .html</a> <o :p></o :p><lspan></font></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman'><span style= font-size:12.Opt'>Headqua rtered in </span></font><stl:place><stl:City Cambridge</stl:City>, <stl:State>Massac husetts</stl :State><c/stl :place>, the <stl:place><stl :PlaceName>Harvard-Smithsonian</stl:PlaceName> <stl: PlaceT ype>Center</stl: PlaceType></stl :place> for Astrophysics (CfA) is a joint collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical observatory and the H-arvard College Observatory. CfA scientists organized into six research divisions study the origin, evolution, and ultimate fate of the universe. <o:p></o:p></p> <p><u><font size=3 face='Times New Ronan"><span style=' font-size:12 .0pt'>For more information, contact</span></font></u>: <o:p></o:p></p> <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style= font-size:12 .0pt'>David Aguilar, Director of Public Affairs<br> file:/D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQ061...fyzgtgo 3%Ceq.txt 8/14/2003
  10. 10. Page 10 of 13 </span></font><stl:place><stl:PlaceNa ae>Harvard-Smithsonian</stl:PlaceName> < stil:PlaceType>Center</stl:PlaceType></s 1l:place> for Astrophysics<br> Phone: 617-495-7462 Fax: 617-495-7468 <br> <a href=tmailto:daguilar~cfa.harvard. du">daguilar~cfa.harvard.edu</a> <o:p>< <p><font size=3 face="Times New Roman '><span style= font-size:12 .Opt'>Christi ne Lafon<br> Public Affairs Specialist<br> </span></font><stl :place><stl :PlaceNa ae>Harvard-Smithsonian</stl :PlaceNamne> < stil:PlaceType>Center</stl :PlaceType></s 1l:place> for AStrophysics<br> Phone: 617-495-7463, Fax: 617-495-7015<br> <a href=rmailto:clafonc~cfa.harvard.ed ">clafon~cfa.harvard.edu</a> <o:p>'c/o:p </ table> <I div> <p class=MsoNormal align=center style=' ext-align:center'><i><font size=2 face='Times New Roman"><span style=' fon -size:l0.Opt;font-style:italic '>Last modified on Monday, 31-llar-2003 </span>c/font></i><stl:time Hour="15" Minute='18"><i><font size=2>cspan style='font-size:10.Opt;font-style:italic'>15 :18:29 EST</span></font></i></stl:time><i><fo t size=2><span style='font-size:10.Opt; font-style:italic'> </span></font></i>< :p></o:p></p> <p class=MsoNormal align=center style=' ext-align:center1><i><font size=2 face="Times New Roman"><span style='fton --size:10.Opt;font-style:italic'>Comment S or Questions? Contact <a href="Mailto:p baffairs~cfa.harvard.edu">pubaffairs~cf a .harvard. edu<!a> </span></font></i><o:p></o:p></p> </body> </html> -- --- END ATTACHMENT 1I= -- --- ATTACHMENT 2 ==----- ATT CREATION TIME/DATE: 0 00:00:00.00 TEXT: Unable to convert NSREOPO1O3:[ATTACH.D4B]SREOP013000TGZY.002 to ASCII, The following is a HEX DUMP: 47494638396121002600F7000071575826020464494B927B7E938B8F462F348B757A473E403104 0FlB030967001C330B168D6C75550019290912642C3C875B6833252985656E7300244A00186514 2E4615245A2032713B4C7A586381002C6B00246300226308276C34478044597944567E6C725F53 5796939483003176002A3C00167C012D35021570092F5308245All2C7927446B2A413A18249483 89B3A0A7AE9DA38600337D003177002D70002A8 013572012D6B012A8303346602287606327306 3173062F6A0D32380AlC6613346D203D601D377B3A538500368300378000347E00347A0032860l 397601318002377B023482033685043A7D04373902196C062F7C0838710B34340518630C2F6A~l file:/D:SEARCH_7_9_03_CEQ061LfyzgtgO 3sceq.txt 8/14/2003
  11. 11. Message Page 1 of 3 NS Harvard -Smithsonian Center for i strophysics s Press Release rn- fred barlr [CfA ri [CfA r CAen Release No.: 03-10 For Release: ftIr.J 31, 2603 that 20th eenturyqneitite~t then az net, enll 3 eentury wth.heaJ norl thea stc teal wenthr U0yas oftheps h ,1 i--FttidtitteMdea n Perod F 80 t as0 A.Bl. and tLe 1tt te g F10 o+0 AD teo rdi phntnni t 1000imte 0 to the EtpfltnJ d Atei-l TLrLh e ±ent in .Whl 20t eentrytetpeatresaret~tehhiherhi in the. -4tl le Ageqpeio, ln~Z. ptrts fiel et/D:iERC_79_03_C iedeQO6it!yzgtg oO) graeqOO lhtmltito nt h 0hcn 8/1420
  12. 12. Message Page 2 of 3 Soon, and eelleagues Hikhtmiks ttnitLMiJn0a0te nitkt Z ftlulding:...J 5 rA hot.e.Jtle d ttittit... diitt g eie .. .. it tt.. 0 :t, a.O. Mkft. 5 t.z goi IX. ~;t:Gp 0 is ''L :i.sq poln set~tflo .edimnts. . .... . 0 ...z.,f tree ring gr'wh, inealY dtn "E ike weansesa ! iesezserie detCe..Lrvd, L.eni t thz eit.. order ana Cwer-*k i to speeifie J a1e1ti itotoetanreineinfeelag;1 h eeideeFt tbe elitafi itkonalis arteti d~t ng Cpa.. -t.et fai tog WOO yIL s II Soo and fie:IDS. TeARCH_7_9_03_CyietteQO6 3steq0001.hwtmli wedyzgtg 8/14/2003.
  13. 13. Page 3 of 3 Message D.. idAp-.Ja., Di eeS of PIblz Affatir A. Phone.. 617 495 ~7462F.614974 dag"H:a& @e~thfp.Lp a J.e.t. AnjAV Ptubiez AffaXr0 ~iL tSfeeiApt JPhm.e.. 61:7 495 7463-, F.~. 1 495 71 Last modifWed on Mondoy 31-Mar-2003 15 :18:29 EST Comment s or Questions? Contact Pi1 gJJ~nf•J.lwnurd~edt 8/14/2003 file://D:SEARCH-7-9-03 CEQO61_t~yzgtg O3sceqSO00l.htmI

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