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CAR Email 6.7.02 (a)

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Email 6.7.02 (a)

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CAR Email 6.7.02 (a)

  1. 1. A1~~~ri5 zoi ~~Page 1of 9 RECORD TYPE: FEDERAL (NOTES MAIL) CREATOR:Jennifer Ise <Jennifer.Ise~noaa gay> ( Jennifer Ise <Jennifer.Ise~noaa.gov> CREATION DATE/TIME: 7-JUN-2002 13:27:01.00 SUBJECT: : bush: " Proceed with global warming!-, TO:Erika <Erika.Wilson~noaa goy> ( Erika <Erika.Wilsonenoaa~gov> UNKNOWNI READ :UNKNOWN TO:Antonia <afairban~nsf.gov> ( Antonia <afairban~nsf.gov> [ UNKNOWN ] READ :UNKNOWN TO:Joseph A. Hartenstine READ :UNKNOWN ( CN=Joseph A. Hartenstine/OU=CEQ/o=EOP@EOP r CEQ TO:tobykovey~aol corn ( tobykovey~aol.com [ UNKNOWNI READ :UNKNOWN TO:scott boczkiewicz <sboczkiewicz~dudek corn> ( scott boczkiewicz <sboczkiewiczgdude READ :UNKNOWN TEXT: http: //ens-news .com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-05-06.asp Jennifer L. Is, Program Specialist NOAA, NOS, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management Estuarine Reserves Division (N/ORM5) 1305 East-West Highway Silver Spring, MD 20910 Jenniifer. Ise~noaa .gov ><> ><> 301-713-3155 ext. 164 ><> ><> - 2002-06-05-06 .asp====-========ATTACHMENT 1 ATT CREATION TIME/DATE: 0 00:00:00.00 TEXT: <html> <head> <title>ens</title> <meta narne="keywords" content="#Attributes.keywords#.> <meta name="description" content="#attributes.description#"> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" link="#000000" vlink='1#330099" alink="#l23C2A`> <!--header logo table start--> <table border="1" bordercolor="#333399"1 bgcolor="#ffffff" cellspacing=`0"1 cellp adding="2" width="l100%"1> <tr> <td align="left" bgcolor="#ffffff"> <center><ca href="http: //www.ecoisp.corn"><img src-"http: //ens-news.cornhirages/'ec ologo.gif" border="0" alt='Save the Barth while you Surf! CLICK HERE"></a></cen ter> file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_f_8flw7003_ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  2. 2. Page 2 of 9 <td width="620" align="right" bgcolor="#ffffff",> <a href="http://ens-news.com/index.asp"><img src="http://ens-news.com/images/en slogo.jpg" width="540", height="157" border="O" alt="ENS H-ome"></td> </tr></table> <I--header logo table end--> <table border="O"1 bordercolor='#333399" bgcolor="#ffffff" cellspacing=lIOr cellp adding="O" width="100%"1> <tr> <td align="left" valign="top" bgcolor=i#33339911> <font size="1"1 face-"verdanall color=`#FDF8EO`><b> &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; <a href="http: //ens-news.com"><font color="#FDF8EO">H-ome</font></a>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; I &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://ens-news.com/about asp"><font color="#FDF8EO">About ENS</font>< /a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;lI&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="mailto:newsgens-news.com"><font color="#FDF8EO"1>Emai1 The Editor</font ></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;lI&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://ens-news.com/newsindex~asp"><font color="#FDF8EO">News Index</f ont></a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;lI&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <a href="http://ens-news.com/events.asp"><font color=II#FDF8EO1>Events Calendar< /font></a> </b></font> <td align="1right" bgcolor="#333399"> <!-- BEGIN DATE SCRIPT -- > <script language= JavaScript"> /*.-- - -- - - - This JavaScript was written by Joey Mornin - --… - *1-- 1/Start Script //The array for the month names var montharray= new Array(ll) montharray[O) "January";montharray(l) = "February";montharray[2]= "March";mo ntharray[3] = "April" ;montharray[4] = "May" ;montharrayf 51 = "June";montharrayt6 = 'July" ;montharray[7] = August" ;montharray[8] = "September' ;montharray[9]= "October";montharray[1O) "November' ;montharray[ll] = "December'; //First, declare the variables var time = new Date() var monthnum time.getMonth() var monthname= montharray[monthnum) var year= time.getFullYear() var day= time.getDate() // Font Properties var font-size= "I" II Font Size var font-color "#FDF8EO" // Font Color var font-family = "Verdana, Anial, MS Sans Serif" / Font Family // Display the date document.write("<font size='" + font_size + "' color='" + font-color + face= 1 + font-family + 1'" docum~ent.write(monthname +"" + day 4 , year + "</font>") // End Script </script><font size="1">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</font> <!-- END DATE SCRIPT -- > file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_ f8flw7003_ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  3. 3. Page 3 of 9 </td></tr></table> <!--main table start--> <table border="O0" bgcolor="#ffffff" cellspacing=bOfl cellpadding="O" width=lOO0% <tr> <!--start left column--> <td bgcolor="#ffffff' valign="top' width="l6Q"> <font size="l1"><br></font> <!--left column content--> <table width="16O" height='118" border="O" bgcolor='#333399" cellspacing="2" ce llpadding=" 0"1> <tr> <td align="center" bgcolor="#333399h> <font face="Verdanall size="2" color="#ffffff"><b>Search ENS News</b></font></td <tr> <td align="center" bgcolor="#FDF8EOI> <FORM METHOD=get ACTTON="http: //ens-news .com/search/search.ijdq" id=forml name=f orml> <font size='1" FACE="1verdana'><b>Ty-pe Search Term,<br>Hit Enter</b> <br><input NAME="CiRestriction" STZE="10" MAXLENGTH="50"><br><br></font> <a href="http: //ens-news.com/researchhelp.asp"><img src='1http://ens-news.com/im ages/researchbutton.gif" border=0O></a> </td></tr></FORM> </table> <br> <I --worldscan--> <table width="160" bgcolor="#FDF8EO" cellpadding="2"> <tr> <td valign="top" width="160' bgcolor="#333399.'> <center><b><font face="Verdana' size="2' color="#ffffff">&nbsp;WorldScan</font> </b></center> </td></tr> <tr> <td valign="1top" width="160" bgcolor=II#FDF8EOI> <font size="l" face="Verdana" color="#000000".> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-19.asp#anchorl">INTERNA TIONALcbr> Wetlands in Three Countries Gift to the Barth</a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06--06-19.asp#anchor2">SOUTH A FRICA<br> Ivory Protest Postcards Pile Up</a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-19.asp#anchor3">JAPAN<b Whalemeat a Toxic Mouthful</a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-O6-19.asp#anchor4"'>CAM4EROO N<br> Illegal Logging Targeted</a></b> file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_fSflw7003_ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  4. 4. Page 4 of 9 <br><br> <><a href="http: //ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-O6-06-19.asp#anchor5"'>CANADA< br> Toronto's First Wind Turbine Anchored</a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-Q6-O6-19.asp#anchor6">AUSTRAL IA/KOREA<br> Agree on Protection for Migrating Birds</a></b> <I td> </tr></table> <!--worldscan--> <br> <I-- HTML to Copy Starts Here -- > <I--Note: For correct presentation of the form, leave HTML formatted *as is*. - <TABLE WTDTH="l6O" CELLPADDING=O CELLSPACING=O BORDER=l bordercolor="#333399" b gcolor=" #FDF8EO"> <FORM ACTION="http: //www.email-publisher.com/survey/" METHOD="POST" TARGET="New -Window" id=form2 name=form2> <INPUT TYPE="1hidden" NAb4E="listS" VALUE="ens~topica.email-publisher.com"> <TR> <TB align="1center" width="160`> <font size="12" face="verdana" color="#990033"1><B>Subscribe to ENS</B></font> <font size="l" face="verdana,sans.-serif"><br>Enter your email to receive news T oday!I<br> <input type="1text" size="lO" name="email" value="email"1><br> <INPUT TYPE=" radio" NAME=" type" VALUE=" HTML" >HTML <INPUT TYPE=" radio" NAME=" type"l VALUE= 'TEXT" >Text <INPUT TYPE="radio" NAME="type" VALUE="AOL">AOL <br><input type="'submit" value=" Join "1><br><br></font> </TD></TR> </FORM> </TABLE> <!-- HTML Ends Here -- > </td> <I--end left column content--> <I--MIDDLE COLUMN, Daily News Begins--> <td bgcolor="#ffffff" align="left" valign="top"-> <!--cellpadding table start--> <table width="1OO%" bgcolor="#ffffftf" cellpadding="lO"1> <tr> <td width="1OO%" bgcolor="#ffffft" align="left" valign="top"> <table width='lOO%" cellpadding="O"1 cellspacing="O" border="O"1> <tr> <td align="left" valign="top"> file:/D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_f_8flw7003 ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  5. 5. Page 5 of 9 <I--middle content start / end tophtml--> <I--middle content end / begin bottomhtml--> <P><B><font size="1+l%.President Bush Rejects Climate Change Report</font></b> <b>By Cat Lazaroff</b><p> <b>WASHTNGTON, DC,</b> June 5, 2002 (ENS) - The White House is distancing itsel f from the Bush administration's first report to admit that humans are causing climate changes. The report from the Environmental Protection Agency, while ack nowledging that human activities lead to global warming, argues that it is bett er to adapt to the changes than to try and stop them. In "Climate Action Report 2002," the third formal U.S. communication to the Uni ted Nations under the Framework Convention on Climate Change the EPA wrote, "Or eenhouse gases are accumulating in Earth's atmosphere as a result of human acti vities, causing global mean surface air temperature and subsurface ocean temper ature to rise." <IMG SRC=". ./pics22/bushspeaks.jpg"I ALIGN=left HSPACE=2 VSPACE=2 ALT="Bush" WID TH=130 HETGHT=127><H5>President George W. Bush called the EPA report a product of a "bureaucracy." <SMALL>4Photo courtesy The White House)</SMALL></H5> Conservation groups hailed the report as representing a shift in the Bush admin istration's attitude toward scientific studies showing that the burning of foss il fuels such as oil, natural gas and coal is creating a blanket of heat trappi ng gasses around the planet. But on Tuesday, a day after news agencies gave widespread coverage to the new r eport, President George W. Bush dismissed the report as having been "put out by the bureaucracy." "I do not support the Kyoto treaty," Bush said, reiterating the position he has held since'his election. "The Kyoto treaty would severely damage the United St ates economy, and I don't accept that. I accept the alternative we put out, tha t we can grow our economy and, at the same time, through technologies, improve our environment." Later the same day, White House press secretary Ani Fleischer added that the Pr esident believes that there is "considerable uncertainty relating to the scien ce of climate change." <P>~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "This report submitted to the United Nations also recognizes that any 'definiti ye prediction of potential outcomes is not yet feasible' and that, 'one of the weakest links in our knowledge is the connection between global and regional pr edictions of climate change'," Fleischer added. <IMG SRC=". ./pics22/shastareservoir.jpg" ALTGN=right HSPACE=2 VSPACE=2 ALT="Sha file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_fSflw7003 ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  6. 6. Page 6 of 9 sta Reservoir" WTDTH=250 HETGHT=155><HS>Changing snowfall patterns could reduce the amount of runoff water from spring thaws available to fill reservoirs like Shasta Lake, behind the Shasta Dam in California. <small>4Photo courtesy National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA))</sma ll></H5> The EPA report warns that total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions are expected to i ncrease by 43 percent between 2000 and 2020, despite Bush administration progra ms to encourage voluntary reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and the use of technology to store or sequester excess carbon dioxide (C02). This rise in emissions will disrupt rain and snowfall patterns, reducing fresh water supplies in reservoirs fed by melting snow, the EPA report projects. Dang erous heat waves will strike with increasing frequency in urban centers, and co astal wetlands, homes and businesses may be inundated by rising sea levels. Some natural habitats could disappear completely, the report warns. 'A few ecosystems, such as alpine meadows in the Rocky mountains and some barni er islands, are likely to disappear entirely in some areas," states the report. "Other ecosystems, such as southeastern forests, are likely to experience majo r species shifts or break up into a mosaic of grasslands, woodlands and forests .cp> <TMG SRC=". ./pics22/evergladeswetland.jpg" ALTGN=left 1-SPACE=2 VSPACE=2 ALT="we tland" WTDTI-=169 1-ETGHT=250><H-5>Coastal wetlands like the Florida Everglades co uld vanish due to rising sea levels, the EPA says. <csmall>(Photo courtesy Florida international University College of Engineering) </small></H-5> Some of these changes have already begun, the EPA says, and little can be done to stop them. "Natural ecosystems appear to be the most vulnerable to climate change because generally little can be done to help them adapt," the report say S. .cp> "Some of the goods and services lost through the disappearance or fragmentation of natural ecosystems are likely to be costly or impossible to replace," adds the report. respite this dire prognosis, the EPA report does not recommend that the U.S. ad opt the emissions reductions required by the Kyoto Protocol, which President Bu sh abandoned last year. In fact, the EPA argues that many of the projected effe cts of global warming in the United States could be positive. The EPA predicts that global warming will likely increase agricultural producti vity in many regions by boosting rainfall in regions that grow cotton, citrus f ruit, sorghum and soybeans. "Based on studies to date, unless there is inadequate or poorly distributed pre cipitation, the net effects of climate change on the agricultural segments of t he U.S. economy over the 21st century are generally projected to be positive," the report concludes. <IMG SRC=". ./pics22/jupiterbeach.jpg" ALIGN=right HSPACE=2 VSPACE=2 ALT="beach" wIrTI-=251 I-EIGHT=193><HS>Low lying areas like Jupiter Beach, Florida face floo ding as sea levels rise. <small>4Photo by Marge Beaver, courtesy NOAA)</small></H5> The EPA recommends that humans work on adapting to climate changes that the rep ort calls "inevitable," rather than spending money and other resources in futil e attempts to prevent the global warming caused by decades of greenhouse gas em, issions. file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_f_8flw7003_ceq~txt 6/21/2006
  7. 7. Page 7 of 9 "Because of the momentum in the climate system and natural climate variability, adapting to a changing climate is inevitable,"~the EPA says. "The question is whether we adapt poorly or well." Among the suggested tactics to help humans adapt to global warming are "1increas ed availability of air conditioning" to reduce the health impacts of heat waves Other nations are prepared to take more proactive actions to reduce the impact of global warming. On Tuesday, Japan ratified the Kyoto Protocol, following dlo se on the heels of Friday's ratification by the 15 members of the European Unio n. Russia has said it will ratify the pact "as soon as possible." <IMG SRC=". ./pics22/alpinemeadow.jpg' ALIGN=left HSPACE=2 VSPACE=2 ALT='meadow" WIDTH=250 HBICHT=134><H5>High elevation alpine meadows like this one in Steamb oat Springs, Colorado, could disappear as the U.S. climate warms. <small>(Photo courtesy High Meadows Ranch)</smal1></H5> The United States is the world's largest emitter of carbon dioxide (C02), the m ajor heat trapping gas released by burning fossil fuels and the main cause of g lobal warming. The European Union, Russia and Japan round out the top four C02 emitters. For the protocol to become legally binding, it must be ratified by at least 55 countries and by industrialized nations that emitted at least 55 percent of the world's C02 in 1990. If Russia ratifies the protocol, it could take effect bef ore the end of the year. The countries that ratify the Kyoto Protocol commit to reducing their emissions of carbon dioxide to an average of 5.2 percent below 1990 levels during the fi ye year period 2008 to 2012. Because President Bush has withdrawn U.S. support for the agreement, the United States would not be bound by the protocol's required emissions reductions. <I--middle content end / begin bottomhtml--> </td></tr> <I/table> </td> </tr> </table> <I--cellpadding table end--> <!-- end middle content table--> <I--start right column--> <td valign="top" align="center" width="160" bgcolor="#ffffff" vlink="#330099> <font size="l"><br></font> <c!-- start right cellpadding table -- > <!--add news--> <table width="160" height="1l8" border="O" bgcolor="#333399" cellspacing="2" ce llpadding= "0"1> <tr> <td align="center" bgcolor='#333399"> <font face="Verdana" size="2" color="#ffffff"1><b>News You Can Use</b></font></t d></tr> <tr> file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_f_8f~w7003_ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  8. 8. Page 8 of 9 <td align="1center" bgcolor='#FDF8EQ"> <font size=lllI face="verdana" color="#OO000'0>&nbsp;cbr> Enliven your website or paper with ENS News.<center><b>Daily headlines FREE!</b <A href="mailto:editor~ens-news.com"><font color="1#9900331><b>Contact Us</b></f ont></a> for details.</A><br>&nbsp;</font></td></tr></table> <I--add news--> <br> <I --ameriscan--> <table width='160" bgcolor="#FDF8EO" cellpadding=2"> <tr> <td valign="top"l width='160" bgcolor="#333399"> <center><b><font face="Verdana" size="2' color="#ffffff">&nbsp;AmneriScan</font> </b></center> <I td>< /tr> <tr> <td valign=1top" width="16O' bgcolor='#FtJF8EQ"> <font size="l"1 face="Verdana" color=" #000000"> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchorl"> <font color="#000000">Studies of Soot Pollution Were Flawed</font></a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchor2'l> <font color="#000000">Greenpeace Maps Potential Chemical Catastrophes</font></a <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchor3II> <font color="#000000">Gulf Sturgeon Could Get Huge Critical H-abitat</font></a>< <br><br> <b> <a href="http: //ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchor4"l> <font color="#000000">Diverse Plant Communities Resist Tnvasion</font></a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchor5"l> <font color="#000000">Exotic Insect Prefers Native Plants</font></a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchor6ul> <font color="#O00000">Turtles Could Move From Threatened to Endangered</font></ <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchor7 '> <font color="#000000">Snowmobiles Stress Out Elk, Wolves</font></a></b> <br><br> <b> <a href="http://ens-news.com/ens/jun2002/2002-06-06-09.asp#anchor8"l> <font color="#000000">Oceana Nets Comments Favoring Ocean Protectiorn</font></a> file:/D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_f-Sflw7003 ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  9. 9. Page 9 of 9 </tr></table> <table width='16Q" bgcolor="#333399" border="O" cellspacing="2 cellpadding="2". <tr> <td align="left" bgcolor="#FDF8EO"> <center><foant face="Verdana" size="2><b><br>advertisment<br><br></b></center> •/td></tr> </table>--> <br> <br> <I--end right ceilpadding table--> <I--end right column--> </tr></table> <I--end main table--> <br><center> <font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size='2" color="black">Copyr ight Environment News Service (ENS) 2002. All Rights Reserved.</font> </center> </body> </html> -- --- END ATTACHMENT 1I= file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_f_8flw7003_ceq.txt 6/21/2006
  10. 10. ens Pagel1 of 4 FSave the Earth while you Surf! CLICK HERE ElESHome Home I About ENS<Ia> I Email The Editor I News Index I Events Calencar /font> Search ENS News President Bush Rejects Climate Change News You Can Use Type Search Term, Report Hit Enter Enliven your website or paper By Cat Lazaroff with ENS News. Daily headlines FREE! 101 ~WASHINGTON, DC, June 5,2002 (ENS) - The Cotc sfrdai. White House is distancing itsel f from the Bush WorldScan administration's first report to admit that humansAmrca are causing climate changes. The report from the A e~a INTERNA TIONAL Eniomna rtcinAecwieakStudies of Soot Pollution Wetlands in Th ree EvrnetlPoeto gny hl c eeFae Countries Gift to the Earth nowledging that human activities lead to global WeeFad warming, argues that it is bett er to adapt to the Greenneace Maps SOUTH A FRICA changes than to try and stop them. PotetaltrChemia Ivory Protest Postcards Ctsrpe Pile Up In "Climate Action Report 2002," the third formal Gulf Sturgeon Could Get Huge Critical JAPAN Whalemeat a Toxic U.S. communication to the Uni ted Nations under Habitat< /b> Mouthful ~~the Framework Convention on Climate Change the Diverse Plant CAMEROO N EPA wrote, "Gr eenhouse gases are accumulating Communities Resist oggng argted Illeal in Earth's atmosphere as a result of human acti Invasion CANADA< br> Toronto's vities, causing global mean surface air temperature Exotic Insect Prefers FichrstWid Trieand subsurface ocean temper ature to rise." Native Plants AUSTRALIA/KOREA ~~~~~~~~~~~~~Turtles Could Move From AUgrAL IA/ProReAtoorBs President George W. Bush called the Threatened to Endangered Aigreetong Pirotcto frBuhEPA report a product of a "bureaucracy." (Photo courtesy The White Snowmobiles Stress out House) Elk. Wolves Conservation groups hailed the Oceana Nets Comments report as representing a shift in Favoring Ocean Protection the Bush admin istration's attitude toward scientific studies showing that the burning of foss il fuels such as oil, natural gas and coal is creating a blanket of heat trappi ng gasses around the planet. But on Tuesday, a day after news agencies gave widespread coverage to the new r eport, President George W. Bush dismissed the report as having been "put out by the bureaucracy." "I do not support the Kyoto treaty," Bush said, reiterating the position he has held since his election. "The Kyoto treaty would severely damage the United St ates economy, and I don't accept that. I accept the alternative we put out, tha file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_fSflw7003 ceqOO00l.html 6/21/2006
  11. 11. ens 'Page 2of 4 t we can grow our economy and, at the same time, through technologies, improve our environment." Later the same day, 'White House press secretary Ax-i Fleischer added that the pr esident believes that there is "consijderable uncertainty relating to the scien ce of climate change." "This report submitted to the United Nations also recognizes that any 'definiti ye prediction of potential outcomes is not yet feasible' and that, 'one of the weakest links in our knowledge is the connection between global and regional pr edictions of climate change'," Fleischer added. Changing Sh snowfall~ sta Reservoir patterns could reduce the amount of runoff water from spring thaws available to fill reservoirs like Shasta Lake, behind the Shasta Dam in California. (Photo courtesy Nationali Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)) The EPA report warns that total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions are expected to i ncrease by 43 percent between 2000 and 2020, despite Bush administration progra ms to encourage voluntary reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and the use of technology to store or sequester excess carbon dioxide (C02). This rise in emissions will dismupt rain and snowfall patterns, reducing fresh water supplies in reservoirs fed by melting snow, the EPA report projects. Dang erous heat waves will strike with increasing frequency in urban centers, and co astal wetlands, homes and businesses may be inundated by rising sea levels. Some natural habitats could disappear completely, the report warns. "A few ecosystems, such as alpine meadows in the Rocky Mountains and some barrn er islands, are likely to disappear entirely in some areas," states the report. "Other ecosystems, such as southeastern forests, are likely to experience majo r species shifts or break up into a mosaic of grasslands, woodlands and forests . we ~~~~~Coastal wetlands like the wien Florida Everglades co uld file://D:SEARCH_7_28_03_CEQ201_f 8flw7003_ceq_0001 .html 6/21/2006
  12. 12. ens Page 3 of 4 vanish due to rising sea levels, the EPA says. (Photo courtesy Florida International University College of Engineering) Some of these changes have already begun, the EPA says, and little can be done to stop them. "Natural ecosystems appear to be the most vulnerable to climate change because generally little can be done to help them adapt,!! the report say s. "Some of the goods and services lost through the disappearance or fragmentation of natural ecosystems are likely to he costly or impossible to replace," adds the report. Despite this dire prognosis, the EPA report does not recommend that the U.S. ad opt the emissions reductions required by the Kyoto Protocol, which President Bu sh abandoned last year. In fact, the EPA argues that many of the projected effe cts of global warming in the United States could be positive. The EPA predicts that global warming will likely increase agricultural producti vity in many regions by boosting rainfall in regions that grow cott on, citrus f ruit, sorghum and soybeans. "Based on studies to date, unless there is inadequate or poorly distributed pre cipitation, the net effects of climate change on the agricultural segments of t he U.S. economy over the 21Ist century are generally projected to be positive,"~ the report concludes. Low lying areas like F- beach Jupiter Beach, Florida face floo ding as sea levels rise. (Photo by Marge Beaver, courtesy NOAA) The EPA recommends that humans work on adapting to climate changes that the rep ort calls '"inevitable,'' rather than spending money and other resources in fuatil e attempts to prevent the global warming caused by decades of greenhouse gas em issions. "Because of the momentum in the climate system and natural climate variability, adapting to a changing climate is inevitable," the EPA says. "The question is whether we adapt poorly or well." Among the suggested tactics to help humans adapt to global warming are "increas ed availability of air conditioning" to file://D:SEARCH_7_28_O3_CEQ201_fSflw7003_ceqOO0l.htm1 6/21/2006
  13. 13. ens IPage 4 of 4 reduce the health impacts of heat waves Other nations are prepared to take more proactive actions to reduce the impact of global warming. On Tuesday, Japan ratified the Kyoto Protocol, following dlo se on thie heels of Friday's ratification by the 15 members of the European Unio n. Russia has said it will ratify the pact "as soon as possible." meadow ~~~~~High meadow ~~~~~~~elevation alpine meadows like this one in Steamb oat Springs, Colorado, could disappear as the U.S. climate warms. (Photo courtesy High Meadows Ranch) The United States is the world's largest emitter of carbon dioxide (C02), the mnajor heat trapping gas released by burning fossil fuels and the main cause of g lobal warming. The European Union, Russia and Japan round out the top four C02 emitters. For the protocol to become legally binding, it must be ratified by at least 55 countries and by industrialized nations that emitted at least 55 percent of the world's C02 in 1990. If Russia ratifies the protocol, it could take effect bef ore the end of the year. The countries that ratify the Kyoto Protocol commit to reducing their emissions of carbon dioxide to an average of 5.2 percent below 1990 levels during the fi ve year period 2008 to 2012. Because President Bush has withdrawn U.S. support for the agreement, the United States would not be bound by the protocol's required emissions reductions. Copyr ight Environment News Service (ENS) 2002. All Rights Reserved. file:/D:SEARCH_7_28_O3 CEQ201_fSflw7003ccqOO00.html 6/21/2006

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