Ppt Reminders

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Ppt Reminders

  1. 1. PowerPoint Etiquette What works in the world ofpresentations…color, fonts, and transitions
  2. 2. Created by Kathy SchrockAdministrator for Technology Nauset Public Schools Orleans MA Based on research in the area of visual design
  3. 3. Introduction to color…
  4. 4. Colors per slide• No more than four colors per slide• Too busy if use more• Viewers don’t know why you are using color• The viewers don’t know what is important and highlighted if you use lots of colorsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  5. 5. Colors per slide• No more than four colors per slide• Too busy if use more• Viewers don’t know why you are using color• The viewers don’t know what is important and highlighted if you use lots of colorsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  6. 6. Colors for type and background…
  7. 7. Colors to use• Light yellow on a blue background• White on a black background• Black on a light yellow background• Black on a white background may be too brightc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  8. 8. Colors to use•Light yellow on a blue background•White on a black background•Black on a light yellow background•Black on a white background may be too brightc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  9. 9. Colors to use•Light yellow on a blue background•White on a black background•Black on a light yellow background•Black on a white background may be too brightc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  10. 10. Colors to use•Light yellow on a blue background•White on a black background•Black on a light yellow background•Black on a white background may be too brightc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  11. 11. Other color information…
  12. 12. Other color information…• Don’t use red for text• It is hard to see and readc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  13. 13. Other color information…• Avoid red on a green background• Colorblind viewers will have difficultyc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  14. 14. Other color information…• For gradients, think “earth to sky”• Darker colors on bottom and lighter on topc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  15. 15. Other color information…• Red backgrounds stimulate emotion• Use burgundy insteadc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  16. 16. Other color information…• Red backgrounds stimulate emotion• Use burgundy insteadc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  17. 17. Other color information…• Green backgrounds make the viewer feel involvement with the topicc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  18. 18. Other color information…• Gray backgrounds make the viewer feel that the information shows a lack of commitment or neutralityc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  19. 19. Other color information…• Blue backgrounds indicate a calm, conservative messagec2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  20. 20. Other color information…• Yellow backgrounds indicate hope for the future and cheerfulnessc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  21. 21. Other color information…• Purple backgrounds give the feeling of fantasy or are perceived as child-like• Save purple for the “lighter” topicsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  22. 22. Other color information…• Brown backgrounds are perceived as the presentation of passive information• Viewers feel that information on brown backgrounds is less stablec2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  23. 23. Other color information…• Black backgrounds indicate power and sophistication• Ideal for presenting information that the audience has no choice but to accept – fixed budget figures – student enrollmentc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  24. 24. Information about fonts…
  25. 25. Information about fonts• Type can express moods and emotions as well as images can• Type can be serious and business-like• Type can be relaxed and open• Don’t let the typeface contradict your message• No more than 3 fonts in no more than 4 sizes during a presentationc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  26. 26. Font details: Serif fonts• Serif fonts – tiny horizontal or vertical lines at the ends of longer line strokes• The serifs help the eye move across the text• Good for large blocks of text• Examples of serif fonts: – Bookman – Garamond – Times New Romanc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  27. 27. Font details: Sans-serif fonts• Sans-serif fonts – NO tiny horizontal or vertical lines at the ends of longer line strokes• Simple strokes of equal weight and thickness• Good for headlines but not lots of text• Examples of serif fonts: – Arial – Comic Sans – Eras Mediumc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  28. 28. Fonts can express a mood• Comic sans is a gentle font• BettysHand is very relaxed• Diner makes you think of the 1950’s• Tinkertoy is a good elementary font• Schools of t en use t he Kids f ont• Century Schoolbook is a formal font• Don’t let the font become distracting!c2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  29. 29. Fonts can be congruent with the themec2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  30. 30. How much text• Use the general 6x6 rule – No more than six words across – No more than six bullet points• Words are considered markers• Text needs to include keywords onlyc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  31. 31. HOW ABOUT CAPITAL LETTERS?• Make limited use of all capital letters• Our eyes need to capture the shapes of the letters above and below the line• Words in all capital letters have nearly the same visual shape• What does this say….c2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  32. 32. IUMRING TO GQNGIUSIOQNSc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  33. 33. IUMRING TO GQNGIUSIOQNSc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  34. 34. Information on transitions…
  35. 35. Information about transitions• Good transitions can… – Help tie your presentation together – Make it flow smoothly between ideas – Signal important ideas to get the audience’s attentionc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  36. 36. Technical aspects of transitions• Transition effects can be used with images, tables, charts, and graphs• Can add movement to – slices of a pie chart – bars in a bar chart – rows in a table – levels in an organization chartc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  37. 37. Types of transitionsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  38. 38. Blinds• The new slide is unveiled in a series of horizontal or vertical rows, similar to the effect of opening the blinds of a windowc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  39. 39. Boxes• The new slide "grows" from the middle of the previous slide, or grows inward from the edges of the screenc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  40. 40. Checkerboards• The new slide appears over the previous slide as a series of boxesc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  41. 41. Dissolves• An advanced case of checkerboards, where the new screen is unveiled in numerous small boxes or other graphic elementsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  42. 42. Wipes• The new slide replaces the previous slide from left to right, top to bottom, or diagonallyc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  43. 43. Flash bulb• Slide title flashes to get the audience’s attentionc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  44. 44. Splits• The new slide expands horizontally or vertically from the center of the screenc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  45. 45. Fade in and dim• Points in a text chart are highlighted one point at a time• This prevents your audience from reading ahead of you• Focuses their attention on the point youre discussing• Dims previously introduced pointsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  46. 46. Using a transition in a diagram Elementary Middle High Schoolc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  47. 47. Choosing the right transition• Should be based on – your message – your audience – the computer hardware – the length of the presentationc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  48. 48. Tips for transitions• Your transitions should reflect the basic feeling of your presentation• Consider the formality of your presentation and the expectations of your audience• Remember that it takes a more powerful computer to use transitionsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  49. 49. Tips for transitions• It may be annoying when the same transitions are used over and over• It may be annoying when too many different types of transitions are used• Use transitions to chunk your informationc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  50. 50. The End
  51. 51. Background on transitions…
  52. 52. Information about transitions• Good transitions can… – Help tie your presentation together – Make it flow smoothly between ideas – Signal important ideas to get the audience’s attentionc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  53. 53. Technical aspects of transitions• Transition effects can be used with images, tables, charts, and graphs• Can add movement to – slices of a pie chart – bars in a bar chart – rows in a table – levels in an organization chartc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  54. 54. Types of transitionsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  55. 55. Blinds• The new slide is unveiled in a series of horizontal or vertical rows, similar to the effect of opening the blinds of a windowc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  56. 56. Boxes• The new slide "grows" from the middle of the previous slide, or grows inward from the edges of the screenc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  57. 57. Checkerboards• The new slide appears over the previous slide as a series of boxesc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  58. 58. Dissolves• An advanced case of checkerboards, where the new screen is unveiled in numerous small boxes or other graphic elementsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  59. 59. Wipes• The new slide replaces the previous slide from left to right, top to bottom, or diagonallyc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  60. 60. Flash bulb• Slide title flashes to get the audience’s attentionc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  61. 61. Splits• The new slide expands horizontally or vertically from the center of the screenc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  62. 62. Fade in and dim• Points in a text chart are highlighted one point at a time• This prevents your audience from reading ahead of you• Focuses their attention on the point youre discussing• Dims previously introduced pointsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  63. 63. Using a transition in a diagram Elementary Middle High Schoolc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  64. 64. Choosing the right transition• Should be based on – your message – your audience – the computer hardware – the length of the presentationc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  65. 65. Tips for transitions• Your transitions should reflect the basic feeling of your presentation• Consider the formality of your presentation and the expectations of your audience.• Remember that it takes a more powerful computer to use transitionsc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  66. 66. Tips for transitions• It may be annoying when the same transitions are used over and over• It may be annoying when too many different types of transitions are used• Use transitions to chunk your informationc2003. Kathy Schrock. kathy@kathyschrock.net
  67. 67. The End

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