Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?
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Can Councils Lead Behaviour Change?

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Warren Hatter's slides from a workshop at the SOLACE Conference 2010. The main message is that UK local government needs to build its capacity to use known behavioural effects and behaviour change techniques. The context is carbon reduction, but the implications are broader. Slides revised to include speaker notes as callouts, for maximum effect!

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  • The famous ‘Piano Stairs’. But why does this work? It’s not just ‘fun’, is it?
  • From a broadsheet reader’s perspective …
  • It’s deep, and we shouldn’t deny it.
  • It’s deep, and we shouldn’t deny it.
  • The example (almost) cited by David Cameron in his TED talk.
  • Key point: something as simple as a smiley has a major impact, which shows that using behaviour effects can be low/no cost, but can need lots of expertise.
  • Key point: something as simple as a smiley has a major impact, which shows that using behaviour effects can be low/no cost, but can need lots of expertise.
  • This is one of many ways of categorising behavioural effects. The different models have much in common and hardly contradict each other – it’s just that there is no definitive understanding.
  • This is one of many ways of categorising behavioural effects. The different models have much in common and hardly contradict each other – it’s just that there is no definitive understanding.
  • If you want to give a non-expert a VERY quick way of thinking about whether they could use behavioural techniques/effects, here is the ultra-shortlist of the effects most likely to work!
  • In the context of reducing emisssions: the major reductions needed are in the emissions of citizens and businesses, not the state. Limited control over this means that if local authorities are to act as place shapers and reduce emissions, they need to be expert in prompting behaviour change.
  • In the context of reducing emisssions: the major reductions needed are in the emissions of citizens and businesses, not the state. Limited control over this means that if local authorities are to act as place shapers and reduce emissions, they need to be expert in prompting behaviour change.
  • Once you let people and places take responsibility for their emissions by including embedded emissions, this is how the emissions of a typical place or person in the UK break down. What does this mean in behavioural terms?
  • Once you let people and places take responsibility for their emissions by including embedded emissions, this is how the emissions of a typical place or person in the UK break down. What does this mean in behavioural terms?
  • There’s lots of knowledge we are just getting to feel our way around. One example of many is the massive difference in emissions between air-freighted and seasonal, local food.
  • Understanding the real breakdown of the emissions for which we are responsible could lead us to a behavioural checklist – a menu of things that doing more or less of will reduce our emissions. This is a very early draft from WSCC developing this idea in relation to food …
  • Understanding the real breakdown of the emissions for which we are responsible could lead us to a behavioural checklist – a menu of things that doing more or less of will reduce our emissions. This is a very early draft from WSCC developing this idea in relation to food …
  • … and in relation to transport.
  • Behaviour change debates rage in these and other areas – more developed in some than others, as is the expertise.
  • We can map our interventions, though the inclination until now has been to use idiomatic terms like ‘carrot and stick’ to help non-experts access the ideas.
  • If we look at a local authority’s behaviour change interventions, we can see examples of behaviour change techniques being used, though often unconsciously.
  • If we look at a local authority’s behaviour change interventions, we can see examples of behaviour change techniques being used, though often unconsciously.
  • What is needed is more systematic approaches. The MINDSPACE adaptation of the 4Es model was a good start.
  • What is needed is more systematic approaches. The MINDSPACE adaptation of the 4Es model was a good start.
  • This is a rhetorical question – local authorities have little deliberate capacity in behaviour change theory or practice.
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