TowardsModernism
Arts and CraftsAesthetic movement:peaked in 1870sAim: to bring together good design and moderntechnology (new machinery an...
MotifsFundamentalmotifs toboth movementsa Ruskinesquereverence for nature:-sunflowers-lilies-peacocks
ColourColour palette:-soft browns-terra-cottas-moss greens-yellows
Industrial RevolutionThe Second Industrial Revolution (1871–1914) involvedsignificant developments for society and the wor...
The role of the worker:  Craftsman         Artist
The role of the worker: -It was William Morriss desire to unite the craftsman and the artist many of the designs were prod...
Patterns  What are they?  Sequences and arrangments of images and shapes  Industrial Revolution:  For a pattern to find a ...
‘Look Books’  What are they?  A seasonal record of a textile mill’s production
Why?These can embodythe elements of wishfulfilment.1810-1820 from a studio of an Alsatiantextile mill, Alsace, France
Why?You can choose yourfantasy from almost anypoint in history.Cloth can be printedcheaply and affordably.Mid 19th Century...
Taste:What is it?How can it be described?-vernacular and street (punk)-educated and refined (Art Nouveau)What is bad taste?
Art Nouveau:                       Art Deco:-lasted from 1880s to about        -A dominant design1910                     ...
ArtStyleNouveau:-distortions of motifs-complexity of interwining shapes-sophisticated colour palette
MotifsFundamentalmotifs toboth movementsa Ruskinesquereverence for nature:-sunflowers-lilies-peacocks
ArtStyleNouveau:Produced using rich, luxuriousmaterials for the upper end of themarket and so never becamepopular with the...
Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism                              Picasso’s                             ...
Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism-Futurisms celebration of speedand machine techhology               ...
Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism-Futurisms celebration of speedand machine techhology-Constructivist...
Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism-Futurisms celebration of speedand machine techhology-Constructivist...
FloralGeometricConversational
Floral                 Geometric               ConversationalWhy called?            Why called?             Why called?Mod...
FloralWhy called?Modern livingcaused the gardenbegan to disappearfrom people’s lives.So sensual pleasureswere brought into...
All over 2 directional
All over non-directional
All over set
All over tossed
All over One-direction
GeometricWhy called?A shape that is not apicture of somethingfrom the ‘real’world.
Abstract
All over
Bull’s-Eye
Confetti
Crescents
Dots
Squares
ConversationalWhy called?Depicts some realcreature or object(excluding flowers).Can be a landscapeor cityscape.Attention g...
American West:Cowboys, Heroes, Comics, TV shows1940s and 1950s
Camouflage:Cloth could be used by middle andupper classes to distinguishthemselves from their employees.Household help wer...
Celestial: 20th CenturyLunar Rocket - 1969 designed byEddie Squires for Warner Fabrics.With the launch of Sputnik 1 in1959...
Photoprints:New York and BrooklynWould have been madeinto men’s shirts
Photoprints:World’s Fair 1939Would have been madeinto men’s shirts
Other MovementsGraffitiMost made tags (pictorialversions of their signatures)
Other MovementsGraffitiKeith Haring made actualpictures of people, dogs,babies and mutating TV setsIt was graffiti that ga...
Riley        Bridget Riley High Sky 2, 1992        Style: Optical
FloralsFlowerbedsWhat parallels tocomputer gamescan you think of?
Sims
Sims
Sims
Designers who us pattern and repetition in their work   TEMDEM FILMS
Designers who us pattern and repetition in their work   HR Geiger
Designers who us pattern and repetition in their work                                                        Piet Mondrian...
QuickTime™ and a     H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
The birth of Graphic Design
Industrial RevolutionThe Second Industrial Revolution (1871–1914) involvedsignificant developments for society and the wor...
The role of the worker:  Craftsman         Artist
Advances in printing technology
1796 - lithographic process inventedIt became possible to print over 1,000 sheetsper hour.Development of ratating cylinder...
Status of the posterJules Cheret’s work elevatedthe status of the posters andadvertising art.Making work for theatre andbu...
BonnardParis DesignerDesigned advertising forFrance-Champagne(top-right)SteinlenProfessional illustratorAn advert for milk...
ColourColour palette:-soft browns-terra-cottas-moss greens-yellows
QuickTime™ and aSorenson Video 3 decompressor are needed to see this picture.
[With] the tremendous growth in industrial power, aswell as … politics and culture … the world of businessand commerce and...
Towards a modern view of life
Towards a modern view of life
Towards a modern view of life
Towards a modern view of life
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Towards a modern view of life

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Patterns and colours began invading our modern lives. Some craftsmen like William Morris thought to tame them. They did this by slowing down the mechnical processes that were shaped by development of favouring of highly brutal yet established industrial production processes. Design as much as the workforce became mechanised. These men and women, became became fearful about what had/or what would become of the individual. Their testimony and challenge was to make sense of the new world of industrialised design and the accompanying methods through stepping back and thinking how design and processes could be tamed and reined in to have a more humanistic scale.

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Towards a modern view of life

  1. 1. TowardsModernism
  2. 2. Arts and CraftsAesthetic movement:peaked in 1870sAim: to bring together good design and moderntechnology (new machinery and working techniques)Arts and Crafts:(Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society)founded in England, 1887Aim: to promote decorative arts
  3. 3. MotifsFundamentalmotifs toboth movementsa Ruskinesquereverence for nature:-sunflowers-lilies-peacocks
  4. 4. ColourColour palette:-soft browns-terra-cottas-moss greens-yellows
  5. 5. Industrial RevolutionThe Second Industrial Revolution (1871–1914) involvedsignificant developments for society and the world.Chemical Mass production of Mechanisation ofElectrical consumer goods manufacture (Petroleum food and drink,Steel industries clothing and transport) and even entertainment (early cinema, radio and gramophone) The 2nd Industrial Revolution served the needs of the population and also provided employment for the increasing numbers of people in the world.
  6. 6. The role of the worker: Craftsman Artist
  7. 7. The role of the worker: -It was William Morriss desire to unite the craftsman and the artist many of the designs were produced by hand (ironically making most of the designs too expensive for the ordinary worker to buy) Craftsman Artist
  8. 8. Patterns What are they? Sequences and arrangments of images and shapes Industrial Revolution: For a pattern to find a market it first must reflect the contemporary mood.
  9. 9. ‘Look Books’ What are they? A seasonal record of a textile mill’s production
  10. 10. Why?These can embodythe elements of wishfulfilment.1810-1820 from a studio of an Alsatiantextile mill, Alsace, France
  11. 11. Why?You can choose yourfantasy from almost anypoint in history.Cloth can be printedcheaply and affordably.Mid 19th Century, Paris,Swatches of the latest European fabrics
  12. 12. Taste:What is it?How can it be described?-vernacular and street (punk)-educated and refined (Art Nouveau)What is bad taste?
  13. 13. Art Nouveau: Art Deco:-lasted from 1880s to about -A dominant design1910 mode of the years between the world wars-"new art" (1920s)-showed a desire to abandon -in 1960s there was athe past and embrace the revival of its style,future previously it was called Arts Decoratifs-called Jugendstil in Germany-called Sezessionstil in Austria-called Modernista in Spain-called style moderne inFrance
  14. 14. ArtStyleNouveau:-distortions of motifs-complexity of interwining shapes-sophisticated colour palette
  15. 15. MotifsFundamentalmotifs toboth movementsa Ruskinesquereverence for nature:-sunflowers-lilies-peacocks
  16. 16. ArtStyleNouveau:Produced using rich, luxuriousmaterials for the upper end of themarket and so never becamepopular with the wider public.
  17. 17. Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907
  18. 18. Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism-Futurisms celebration of speedand machine techhology The cover of the last edition of BLAST, journal of the British Vorticist movement, a movement heavily influenced by futurism.
  19. 19. Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism-Futurisms celebration of speedand machine techhology-Constructivists love of industrialmaterials and usable objects Kazimir Malevici: Suprematism 1916 Muzeul de Art, Krasnodar
  20. 20. Art Deco:Style (influences)-geometric planes of Cubism-Futurisms celebration of speedand machine techhology-Constructivists love of industrialmaterials and usable objects-a Fauvist (Ballet Russes) feelingfor colour and simple flattenedshapes The Dessert: Harmony In Red (1908) by Henri Matisse.
  21. 21. FloralGeometricConversational
  22. 22. Floral Geometric ConversationalWhy called? Why called? Why called?Modern living A shape that is not a Depicts some realcaused the garden picture of something creature or objectbegan to disappear from the ‘real’ (excluding flowers).from people’s lives. world. Can be a landscapeSo sensual pleasures or cityscape.were brought into Attention grabing.the home in the formof printed fabrics. The designer removes the ‘motifs’ from the usual surroundings.
  23. 23. FloralWhy called?Modern livingcaused the gardenbegan to disappearfrom people’s lives.So sensual pleasureswere brought intothe home in the formof printed fabrics.
  24. 24. All over 2 directional
  25. 25. All over non-directional
  26. 26. All over set
  27. 27. All over tossed
  28. 28. All over One-direction
  29. 29. GeometricWhy called?A shape that is not apicture of somethingfrom the ‘real’world.
  30. 30. Abstract
  31. 31. All over
  32. 32. Bull’s-Eye
  33. 33. Confetti
  34. 34. Crescents
  35. 35. Dots
  36. 36. Squares
  37. 37. ConversationalWhy called?Depicts some realcreature or object(excluding flowers).Can be a landscapeor cityscape.Attention grabing.The designerremoves the ‘motifs’from the usualsurroundings.
  38. 38. American West:Cowboys, Heroes, Comics, TV shows1940s and 1950s
  39. 39. Camouflage:Cloth could be used by middle andupper classes to distinguishthemselves from their employees.Household help were dressed indark fabrics that had the effect of‘camouflaging’ the wearer from theeyes of the superiors.It also hidesdirt.1980s - it was endorsed by thefashion industry.1990s - used in warfare - operationDesert Storm.
  40. 40. Celestial: 20th CenturyLunar Rocket - 1969 designed byEddie Squires for Warner Fabrics.With the launch of Sputnik 1 in1959, the sky had a new,mechanical kind of star. Rockets,satellites, planets and galaxies.Telescopes probing into space wereallowing people to explore the nightsky through the windows of homes.
  41. 41. Photoprints:New York and BrooklynWould have been madeinto men’s shirts
  42. 42. Photoprints:World’s Fair 1939Would have been madeinto men’s shirts
  43. 43. Other MovementsGraffitiMost made tags (pictorialversions of their signatures)
  44. 44. Other MovementsGraffitiKeith Haring made actualpictures of people, dogs,babies and mutating TV setsIt was graffiti that gave him theidea of working in publicspacesIn 1980s his New York subwaychalk-drawings became sopopular that the posters hedrew on were often stolen assoon as hed finished themCheap goodsAswell as continuing his outdoormurals, he also printed oncheap goods including: t shirts,and fabrics
  45. 45. Riley Bridget Riley High Sky 2, 1992 Style: Optical
  46. 46. FloralsFlowerbedsWhat parallels tocomputer gamescan you think of?
  47. 47. Sims
  48. 48. Sims
  49. 49. Sims
  50. 50. Designers who us pattern and repetition in their work TEMDEM FILMS
  51. 51. Designers who us pattern and repetition in their work HR Geiger
  52. 52. Designers who us pattern and repetition in their work Piet Mondrian Broadway Boogie 1942-43
  53. 53. QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
  54. 54. The birth of Graphic Design
  55. 55. Industrial RevolutionThe Second Industrial Revolution (1871–1914) involvedsignificant developments for society and the world.Chemical Mass production of Mechanisation ofElectrical consumer goods manufacture (foodPetroleum and drink, clothingSteel industries and transport) and even entertainment (early cinema, radio and gramophone) The 2nd Industrial Revolution served the needs of the population and also provided employment for the increasing numbers of people in the world.
  56. 56. The role of the worker: Craftsman Artist
  57. 57. Advances in printing technology
  58. 58. 1796 - lithographic process inventedIt became possible to print over 1,000 sheetsper hour.Development of ratating cylinders.1860s Photo-relief printing.1905 - Ira Rubel invented the ‘offset’ printingprocess.
  59. 59. Status of the posterJules Cheret’s work elevatedthe status of the posters andadvertising art.Making work for theatre andbusiness.Toulouse-LautrecCreated the adverts forstageshows happening at thenotorious ‘Moulin Rouge’.
  60. 60. BonnardParis DesignerDesigned advertising forFrance-Champagne(top-right)SteinlenProfessional illustratorAn advert for milk(top-left)
  61. 61. ColourColour palette:-soft browns-terra-cottas-moss greens-yellows
  62. 62. QuickTime™ and aSorenson Video 3 decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  63. 63. [With] the tremendous growth in industrial power, aswell as … politics and culture … the world of businessand commerce and graphic arts are more closely linkedthan ever. Fritz H Ehmcke Deutsche Gebrauchsgraphik, 1927

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