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Preparing for a Disaster Response:
Lessons Learned
Cory Gooch
Head of Collections
Frye Art Museum, Seattle, WA
cgooch@frye...
WMA 2015
Planning for Disaster:
a case study of
water response & recovery
Slide Title
Asset or Risk?
8:00 Friday morning,
December 19, 2008
Remember … water runs down
Take time to make decisions
and plan a course of action
Candidates for drying in-house
Drying in-house
Packing out wet books
for freezing
Logistical challenges
December 20-26, 2008
Documenting Claim
• Database to identify and track all affected
books
• Establish current values
• Consider using estimate...
Recovery continues
Demolition and Reconstruction
Triage
Persistent Evidence
What Worked
• Invest in emergency planning
• Keep manuals up-to-date
• Understand responsibilities
• Act decisively
• Asse...
What We Learned
• Communicate clearly, consistently and
frequently
• Work closely with insurance and claims
representative...
Part One: A Disaster Response
…and lessons learned
Chain of Command
Museum Example
Examples of Incident Command Systems
School
Hospital
Example of Incident Command System
Chain of Command
Museum Example
Part Two: A Disaster Response
Network
…and lessons learned
http://www.heritageemergency.org/initiatives/alliance-for-response/networks/
http://calpreservation.org/information_resources/california-preservation-and-
disaster-networks/
http://westpas.org/courses/
By-Laws
• Article I: Name
• Article II: Purpose and Function
• Article III: Membership
– Section 1: Members
– Section 2: R...
• This Mutual Aid Agreement ("Agreement") is made and entered into by and
between the undersigned libraries, archives, mus...
• The Pocket Response Plan (PReP)™ is a concise document for recording essential information needed by
staff in case of a ...
SHERN’s PReP plan
Template for Pocket Response Plan for Collections SIDE A (Communications). Use this side to collect phon...
• The Seattle Heritage Emergency Response Network
(SHERN) helps archives, historical societies, libraries,
museums, and ot...
Mission Statement - Objectives
1) To promote awareness of potential emergency and disaster
situations in Seattle and measu...
Mission Statement – More Objectives
5) To acquire, on a cooperative basis, supplies and equipment to support
the disaster ...
Objective: Workshops
• 3) To facilitate or organize workshops and
seminars to help members acquire the
expertise needed to...
Objective: First Responders
7) To facilitate partnerships between members
and local first responders and emergency
manager...
Objective: Shared Supplies
5) To acquire, on a cooperative basis, supplies
and equipment to support the disaster
preparedn...
SHERN Supply Wish List
By-Laws
• Article I: Name
• Article II: Purpose and Function
• Article III: Membership
– Section 1: Members
– Section 2: R...
• Will you be applying for grants?
• Will you be asking for vendors or other organizations to make
either financial or in-...
• Do you need to file as a corporation with your state, and
receive a UBI number?
• Do you wish to become a 503-C organiza...
http://www.heritageemergency.org/initiatives/alliance-for-response/networks/
Seattle Heritage Emergency Response Network
SHERN
 HOME
 FOUNDING DOCUMENTS
 INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS
 MEMBERSHIP LIST
 ...
Cory Gooch
Head of Collections
Frye Art Museum, Seattle
cgooch@fryemuseum.org
tel.206-432-8228
WMA 2015
Planning for Disaster:
a case study of
water response & recovery
Slide Title
Asset or Risk?
8:00 Friday morning,
December 19, 2008
Remember … water runs down
Take time to make decisions
and plan a course of action
Candidates for drying in-house
Drying in-house
Packing out wet books
for freezing
Logistical challenges
December 20-26, 2008
Documenting Claim
 Database to identify and track all
affected books
 Establish current values
 Consider using estimate...
Recovery continues
Demolition and Reconstruction
Triage
Persistent Evidence
What Worked
 Invest in emergency planning
 Keep manuals up-to-date
 Understand responsibilities
 Act decisively
 Asse...
What We Learned
 Communicate clearly, consistently
and frequently
 Work closely with insurance and
claims representative...
IT Disasters:
Recovery and Avoidance
Larry Patague
Network Administrator, Oakland Museum of California
Keep Informed
 Create and know your business continuity plan
 Know the dependencies between IT, facilities, security
and...
Communicate
 Be absolutely clear on the priority of the services you
need restored, and keep your IT team updated when
pr...
Ensure Data Integrity
 Have your important data in multiple locations. Local,
in the cloud and/or off site storage
 Make...
Logical Disasters
 Your IT team has to deal with the same threats that
affect Fortune 500 companies
 Cyber terrorism, va...
Cyber Terrorism
 What is it?
 An attack that can cause massive disruption and possibly
physical damage to equipment and ...
Vandalism
 What is it?
 Defacing of public sites or media shown on the Internet or
in galleries
 Why would our museum b...
Malware
 What is it?
 Viruses, worms and trojans
 Why would our museum be targeted?
 Malware is mostly random but a ta...
Botnets
(a.k.a. Zombie Army)
 What is it?
 Many networked computers infected with malware that
allows them to be control...
Phishing
 What is it?
 The act of trying to gain information from you through
devious acts and impersonation
 Why would...
Ransomware
 What is it?
 Newest form of malware that encrypts your files and
permanently locks you out after a set amoun...
Be Proactive
 By avoiding logical attacks you stave off disaster
 Keep your passwords strong and don’t reuse them on
oth...
Contact Info
 Larry Patague
 lpatague@museumca.org
 510-318-8552
Click to edit Master text styles
Preparing for Disasters:
Have a Plan in Place
Before You Need it
119
Click to edit Master text styles
Preparing for Disasters
Martha Sharma
Accreditation Program Officer, American Alliance of...
Click to edit Master text styles
Why a Disaster Preparedness and
Emergency Response Plan?
Safeguard your Assets
• Visitors...
Click to edit Master text styles
• Tailored to the institution
• Covers relevant threats/risks
• Addresses staff, visitors...
Click to edit Master text styles
EXAMPLES
TYPES OF THREATS
Natural Mechanical Biological Human
Tornado Power Failure Insec...
Click to edit Master text styles
FOUR STAGES OF RISK MANAGEMENT
Mitigation
How does the museum prevent disasters and emerg...
Click to edit Master text styles
Core Documents Online Resources
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It
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Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It

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Presenters:
Cory Gooch, Head of Collections, Frye Art Museum
Mary Morganti, Director of Library & Archives, California Historical Society (retired)
Larry Patague, Network Administrator, Oakland Museum of California
Moderator:
Martha Sharma, Accreditation Program Officer, American Alliance of Museums

Having a comprehensive and up-to-date emergency plan in place is basic risk management and collections stewardship, and yet 78% of museums and 92% of historical societies do not have one. Learn more about the essential components of emergency preparedness and disaster-recovery plans and how to customize them for your museum.

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Preparing for Disasters: Get a Plan in Place Before You Need It

  1. 1. Preparing for a Disaster Response: Lessons Learned Cory Gooch Head of Collections Frye Art Museum, Seattle, WA cgooch@fryemuseum.org
  2. 2. WMA 2015 Planning for Disaster: a case study of water response & recovery
  3. 3. Slide Title
  4. 4. Asset or Risk?
  5. 5. 8:00 Friday morning, December 19, 2008
  6. 6. Remember … water runs down
  7. 7. Take time to make decisions and plan a course of action
  8. 8. Candidates for drying in-house
  9. 9. Drying in-house
  10. 10. Packing out wet books for freezing
  11. 11. Logistical challenges
  12. 12. December 20-26, 2008
  13. 13. Documenting Claim • Database to identify and track all affected books • Establish current values • Consider using estimated replacement costs
  14. 14. Recovery continues
  15. 15. Demolition and Reconstruction
  16. 16. Triage
  17. 17. Persistent Evidence
  18. 18. What Worked • Invest in emergency planning • Keep manuals up-to-date • Understand responsibilities • Act decisively • Assess and isolate damage • Establish vendor relationships • Work as a team
  19. 19. What We Learned • Communicate clearly, consistently and frequently • Work closely with insurance and claims representatives • Involve local first responders in emergency planning • Plan for recovery time
  20. 20. Part One: A Disaster Response …and lessons learned
  21. 21. Chain of Command Museum Example
  22. 22. Examples of Incident Command Systems School Hospital
  23. 23. Example of Incident Command System
  24. 24. Chain of Command Museum Example
  25. 25. Part Two: A Disaster Response Network …and lessons learned
  26. 26. http://www.heritageemergency.org/initiatives/alliance-for-response/networks/
  27. 27. http://calpreservation.org/information_resources/california-preservation-and- disaster-networks/
  28. 28. http://westpas.org/courses/
  29. 29. By-Laws • Article I: Name • Article II: Purpose and Function • Article III: Membership – Section 1: Members – Section 2: Representatives – Section 3: Term of Membership – Section 4: Service on Committees – Section 5: Term and Termination • Article IV: Committees – Section 1: Steering Committee – Section 2: Board of Directors – Section 3: Other Committees • Article V: Duties of the Board of Directors Officers – Section 1: Chairperson – Section 2: Vice-Chairperson/ Treasurer – Section 3: Secretary •Article VI: Meetings •Section 1: Frequency •Section 2: Special Meetings •Section 3: Committee Meetings •Section 4: Quorum •Section 5: Location •Section 6: Agenda •Section 7: Rules of Order •Section 8: Notice of Meeting Dates and Times •Article VII: Voting •Section 1: One Vote •Section 2: Abstentions •Section 3: Determination of Actions •Article VIII: Archives •Article IX: Ratification Provisions and Amendments •Section 1: Ratification Provisions •Section 2: Amendments
  30. 30. • This Mutual Aid Agreement ("Agreement") is made and entered into by and between the undersigned libraries, archives, museums, and related heritage organizations in Seattle and adjacent areas of King County, whose directors or chief executives have signed this Agreement ("Parties") and is effective on November 1, 2010. • The Agreement serves as a framework in which to share expertise, experience and mutual assistance efforts with the goal of mitigating damages that could occur in the face of a disaster, and thereby impact the operations of the Parties or a specific Party. Mutual Aid Agreement
  31. 31. • The Pocket Response Plan (PReP)™ is a concise document for recording essential information needed by staff in case of a disaster or other emergency. Every person having a response-related assignment should carry a PReP with them at all times. • • The Pocket Response Plan (PReP) is intended to be customized for each institution and individual staff member. It is printed on both sides of a legal-size sheet of paper, then trimmed and folded to credit card size and stored in a Tyvek™ envelope that fits easily into a wallet. • On one side is an Emergency Communication Directory, with contact information for staff, first responders, emergency services, utilities, vendors and suppliers, disaster teams, and other essential individuals and agencies. • The other side contains an Emergency Response Checklist: an organized list of those actions that each individual should take in the first 24 to 72 hours following a disaster. • The PReP is meant to complement, not replace, an agency's disaster plan. It ensures that managers and staff have the most essential information with them at all times.
  32. 32. SHERN’s PReP plan Template for Pocket Response Plan for Collections SIDE A (Communications). Use this side to collect phone numbers for the individuals and organizations you are most likely to need to talk to in the first minutes and hours after an emergency occurs: staff, emergency responders, facility managers, utilities, vendors, and assistance organizations. Seattle Heritage Emergency Response Network (SHERN) Pocket Response Plan for Collections Date revised: 4/22/2015 Board Members Chair Laura Phillips Burke Museum Secretary Loretta Green Providence Archives Fiscal Sponser Allied Arts Foundation Karen Kane Artist Sponsorship 4111 E. Madison St., #52 Seattle, WA 98112 W: 206-624-0432 kkane@alliedarts-foundation.org NETWORK ARCHIVES Contact Providence Archives SUPPLY CACHE LOCATION SHERN Members by type of Institution ARCHIVES Archdiocese of Seattle Seth Dalby Director W: 206-382-4352 C: 206-434-8545 seth.dalby@seattlearch.org Ben Altenhofen Records Specialist W: 206-382-4873 C: 206-226-3451 bena@seattlearch.org City of Lake Forest Park Jennifer A. Martin Records Management Specialist W: 206-957-2810 C: 425-205-1822 jmartin@cityoflfp.com JoAnne Trudel (alt) Deputy City Clerk. W: 206-957-2809 C: 206-427-8047 jtrudel@cityoflfp.com Diocese of Olympia (Seattle) Diane Wells Archivist and Records Manager W: 206-325-4200 ext. 2023 C: 253-670-0638 dwells@ecww.org King County Archives Carol Shenk County Archivist W: 206-205-1396 C: 206-200-2161 carol.shenk@kingcounty.gov Deborah Kennedy (alt) ARMMS Section Manager W: 206- 477-0288 deborah.kennedy@kingcounty.gov NARA Pacific Alaska Region Scott Roley Senior Records Analyst W: 206-336-5124 C: 206-445-4147 scott.roley@nara.gov Providence Archives Loretta Greene Archivist W: 206-923-4010 C: 206-818-8533 loretta.greene@providence.org Peter Schmid (alt) Visual Resources Archivist W: 206-923-4012 C: 206-854-3455 peter.schmid@providence.org LIBRARIES Gallagher Law Library University of Washington Jonathan Franklin Assoc. Law Librarian W: 206-543-4089 jafrank@u.washington.edu King County Law Library Rita Dermody Director W: 206-477-1305 C: 206-818-1191 rita.dermody@kingcounty.gov The Seattle Public Library Andrew Harbison Asst. Director of Collections and Access W: 206-684-9287 Andrew.Harbison@spl.orgo Jodee Fenton (alt.) Manager of Special Collections W: 206-386-4610 Jodee.Fenton@spl.org UW Libraries Stephanie Lamson Preservation Librarian W: 206-543-4890 (o) 206-459-6383 (disaster cell) C: 206-353-3346 salamson@uw.edu UW Libraries (Cont.) Kate Leonard (alt) Conservation Supervisor W: 206-543-2273 C: 206-245-9667 katel@uw.edu MUSEUMS Burke Museum, UW Laura Phillips Archaeology Collections Manager W: 206-685-3849 ext. 2 C: 206-779-8171 lphill@uw.edu Hollye M. Keister (alt) Registrar W: 206-616-7318 C: 253-732-0938 burkereg@uw.edu Frye Art Museum Cory Gooch Head of Collections W: 206-432-8228 C: 206-437-4741 cgooch@fryemuseum.org Erik Luc (alt) Manager, Security Services W: 206-432-8250 C: 315-854-6234 eluc@fryemuseum.org Henry Art Gallery, UW Susan Lewandowski Manager of Exhibitions & Registration W: 206-616-9624 susanl@henryart.org Eric Carson (alt) Operations Manager W: 206-616-8627 ericc@henryart.org MOHAI Betsy Bruemmer Collections Manager W: 206-324-1126 ext. 122 C: 206-330-5417 betsy.bruemmer@mohai.org MOHAI (Cont.) Clara Berg Textile Specialist W: 206-324-1126 ext. 144 C: 206-473-0857 clara.berg@mohai.org Nordic Heritage Museum Ariane Westin-McCaw Registrar W: 206-789-5707 C: 206-854-2930 arianewm@nordicmuseum.org Museum of Flight Allison Loveland Collections Specialist W: 206-768-7195 C: 206-303-7341 Aloveland@museumofflight.org Christine Runte Registrar W: 206-768-7120 Crunte@museumofflight.org Seattle Art Museum Julie Creahan Collections Care Manager W: 206-654-3109 C: 206-724-1543 juliec@seattleartmuseum.org Nicholas Dorman (alt) Chief Conservator W: 206-654-3253 C: nicholasd@seattleartmuseum.org CONSULTANTS Gary Menges UW Libraries, Retired H: 206-325-1131 menges@uw.edu CONSERVATORS OBJECTS Corine Landrieu Seattle 206-715-2549 art.conservation@outlook.com Linda Roundhill Woodinville 425-481-0720 artsconservation@comcast.net PAPER Gudrun Aurand Olympia, WA 98502 360- 464-7660 paper2book4you@yahoo.com Alice Bear Seattle 206- 323-5219 abear@onbcom.com Lisa Duncan Seattle 505- 710-1464 lisaduncan.artconservator@gmail.com Fraser Spafford Ricci Art & Archival Conservation Inc. South Surrey, BC 604.536.3595 sarah@fsrconservation.com Julia Thompson Seattle 206- 937-2625 jtconservation@gmail.com PAINTINGS/FINE ARTS Peter Malarkey Seattle/Port Angeles 206-841-2026 pmpc@att.net Bruce Miller Redmond 425-881-3969 bruce@bfmiller.com Richard Boerth - for FRAMES Seattle (206) 441-4062
  33. 33. • The Seattle Heritage Emergency Response Network (SHERN) helps archives, historical societies, libraries, museums, and other heritage organizations in Seattle to respond to emergencies and disasters affecting cultural resources and collections. Members help each other by providing advice, support and/or actual recovery assistance. • Membership in the Network constitutes a commitment by an organization to make disaster preparedness and staff training an administrative priority. Mission Statement
  34. 34. Mission Statement - Objectives 1) To promote awareness of potential emergency and disaster situations in Seattle and measures that members can take to prevent, prepare for, and respond to disasters; 2) To assist member organizations in the development of their disaster and collection salvage plans; 3) To facilitate or organize workshops and seminars to help members acquire the expertise needed to cope with emergencies and disasters; 4) To prepare and disseminate to any interested archive, historical society, library, museum or other heritage organization lists of local preservation and disaster services, supplies and suppliers, and resource persons, etc. to supplement state-wide and national resources;
  35. 35. Mission Statement – More Objectives 5) To acquire, on a cooperative basis, supplies and equipment to support the disaster preparedness and collection salvage programs of member organizations; 6) To set up subcommittees and task forces to deal with specific, identified problems; 7) To facilitate partnerships between members and local first responders and emergency managers before disasters in order to enhance cooperation and understanding; 8) To cooperate with other disaster response networks in Washington and encourage the development of similar networks in greater King County and other Washington counties.
  36. 36. Objective: Workshops • 3) To facilitate or organize workshops and seminars to help members acquire the expertise needed to cope with emergencies and disasters;
  37. 37. Objective: First Responders 7) To facilitate partnerships between members and local first responders and emergency managers before disasters in order to enhance cooperation and understanding;
  38. 38. Objective: Shared Supplies 5) To acquire, on a cooperative basis, supplies and equipment to support the disaster preparedness and collection salvage programs of member organizations;
  39. 39. SHERN Supply Wish List
  40. 40. By-Laws • Article I: Name • Article II: Purpose and Function • Article III: Membership – Section 1: Members – Section 2: Representatives – Section 3: Term of Membership – Section 4: Service on Committees – Section 5: Term and Termination • Article IV: Committees – Section 1: Steering Committee – Section 2: Board of Directors – Section 3: Other Committees • Article V: Duties of the Board of Directors Officers – Section 1: Chairperson – Section 2: Vice-Chairperson/ Treasurer – Section 3: Secretary •Article VI: Meetings •Section 1: Frequency •Section 2: Special Meetings •Section 3: Committee Meetings •Section 4: Quorum •Section 5: Location •Section 6: Agenda •Section 7: Rules of Order •Section 8: Notice of Meeting Dates and Times •Article VII: Voting •Section 1: One Vote •Section 2: Abstentions •Section 3: Determination of Actions •Article VIII: Archives •Article IX: Ratification Provisions and Amendments •Section 1: Ratification Provisions •Section 2: Amendments
  41. 41. • Will you be applying for grants? • Will you be asking for vendors or other organizations to make either financial or in-kind donations to your network? • Will you be collecting annual dues from your members, and if so, have you elected or appointed a treasurer, and opened a checking account (preferably interest-free) with a credit union or bank? • Will you be using another organization to act as your fiscal sponsor? Do they have a handling fee or take a percentage of any grants you receive? Questions to ask / Decisions to make:
  42. 42. • Do you need to file as a corporation with your state, and receive a UBI number? • Do you wish to become a 503-C organization and obtain a Federal tax identification number? • What kind of sub-committees might you need to form to deal with all of these issues? Questions to ask / Decisions to make:
  43. 43. http://www.heritageemergency.org/initiatives/alliance-for-response/networks/
  44. 44. Seattle Heritage Emergency Response Network SHERN  HOME  FOUNDING DOCUMENTS  INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS  MEMBERSHIP LIST  PAST MEETING MINUTES  PAST MEETING SUMMARIES  PAST WORKSHOPS  RESOURCES  SHERN EMERGENCY HUB Founding Documents SHERN Mutual Aid Agreement SHERN Mission Statement SHERN By-Laws
  45. 45. Cory Gooch Head of Collections Frye Art Museum, Seattle cgooch@fryemuseum.org tel.206-432-8228
  46. 46. WMA 2015 Planning for Disaster: a case study of water response & recovery
  47. 47. Slide Title
  48. 48. Asset or Risk?
  49. 49. 8:00 Friday morning, December 19, 2008
  50. 50. Remember … water runs down
  51. 51. Take time to make decisions and plan a course of action
  52. 52. Candidates for drying in-house
  53. 53. Drying in-house
  54. 54. Packing out wet books for freezing
  55. 55. Logistical challenges
  56. 56. December 20-26, 2008
  57. 57. Documenting Claim  Database to identify and track all affected books  Establish current values  Consider using estimated replacement costs
  58. 58. Recovery continues
  59. 59. Demolition and Reconstruction
  60. 60. Triage
  61. 61. Persistent Evidence
  62. 62. What Worked  Invest in emergency planning  Keep manuals up-to-date  Understand responsibilities  Act decisively  Assess and isolate damage  Establish vendor relationships  Work as a team
  63. 63. What We Learned  Communicate clearly, consistently and frequently  Work closely with insurance and claims representatives  Involve local first responders in emergency planning  Plan for recovery time
  64. 64. IT Disasters: Recovery and Avoidance Larry Patague Network Administrator, Oakland Museum of California
  65. 65. Keep Informed  Create and know your business continuity plan  Know the dependencies between IT, facilities, security and environmental controls  Continuously update your plan to account for changes and shifts in priorities
  66. 66. Communicate  Be absolutely clear on the priority of the services you need restored, and keep your IT team updated when priorities shift  Have a clear understanding on what it will take to restore those services  Create service level agreements with your IT team to have an estimated time frame to restore various services so that there are no surprises
  67. 67. Ensure Data Integrity  Have your important data in multiple locations. Local, in the cloud and/or off site storage  Make sure your data is tested thoroughly
  68. 68. Logical Disasters  Your IT team has to deal with the same threats that affect Fortune 500 companies  Cyber terrorism, vandalism, malware, botnets, phishing and ransomware  Attacks can come from not only the Internet, but through WiFi you provide, the environmental system you maintain and even the media in galleries
  69. 69. Cyber Terrorism  What is it?  An attack that can cause massive disruption and possibly physical damage to equipment and people  Why would our museum be a target?  Possibly the least likely to happen due to the targeted nature of the attacks  How do I avoid this attack?  You can’t. Once they target you all you can do is deal with it.
  70. 70. Vandalism  What is it?  Defacing of public sites or media shown on the Internet or in galleries  Why would our museum be a target?  Like graffiti this can be random or it can be someone who for some reason does not like your museum  How do I avoid this attack?  Like cyber terrorism, this is a targeted attack so it cannot be avoided
  71. 71. Malware  What is it?  Viruses, worms and trojans  Why would our museum be targeted?  Malware is mostly random but a targeted attack would be for information gathering or botnets  How can I avoid malware?  Be safe and mindful of what you open and where you go. Have virus scanners and other tools to help you.
  72. 72. Botnets (a.k.a. Zombie Army)  What is it?  Many networked computers infected with malware that allows them to be controlled as a group  Why would our museum be a target?  Possible lack of security would make a museum an inviting target  How can I avoid this attack?  Botnets are created through malware so the same strategies apply here
  73. 73. Phishing  What is it?  The act of trying to gain information from you through devious acts and impersonation  Why would our museum be targeted?  An attack vector to get access to your computer or museum financial information  How can I avoid this attack?  Never give your password out and never give personal/business information to unverified sources
  74. 74. Ransomware  What is it?  Newest form of malware that encrypts your files and permanently locks you out after a set amount of time if you do not pay the ransom  Why would our museum be a target?  Since it is malware it can be random but since a museum takes grants and sells goods it may be seen as a target to coerce money from  How can I avoid this attack?  This is a malware variant so same rules apply here
  75. 75. Be Proactive  By avoiding logical attacks you stave off disaster  Keep your passwords strong and don’t reuse them on other sites  Ensure your IT team subscribes to the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) advisories or something similar
  76. 76. Contact Info  Larry Patague  lpatague@museumca.org  510-318-8552
  77. 77. Click to edit Master text styles Preparing for Disasters: Have a Plan in Place Before You Need it 119
  78. 78. Click to edit Master text styles Preparing for Disasters Martha Sharma Accreditation Program Officer, American Alliance of Museums Cory Gooch Head of Collections, Frye Art Museum Larry Patague Network Administrator, Oakland Museum of California Mary Morganti Director of Library & Archives (retired), California Historical Society 120
  79. 79. Click to edit Master text styles Why a Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Response Plan? Safeguard your Assets • Visitors • Staff • Facilities • Collections
  80. 80. Click to edit Master text styles • Tailored to the institution • Covers relevant threats/risks • Addresses staff, visitors, structures, and collections • Includes evacuation plans for people & collections • Delegates responsibility for implementation The Required Elements August 2004 FLMNH Elise V. LeCompte
  81. 81. Click to edit Master text styles EXAMPLES TYPES OF THREATS Natural Mechanical Biological Human Tornado Power Failure Insects Terrorism Flood Explosion Rodents/Animals Bomb Threats Earthquake Chemical Spill Disease Vandalism Hurricane Gas Leak Poison Theft
  82. 82. Click to edit Master text styles FOUR STAGES OF RISK MANAGEMENT Mitigation How does the museum prevent disasters and emergencies from impacting collections, occupants and operations? » Examples:Integrated Pest Management, Facility Assessments, Housekeeping, etc. Preparedness How does the museum prepare staff and visitors to effectively respond to and recover from the disasters or emergencies the museum may experience? » Examples:Training, Drills and Exercises, Emergency Kits, Salvage Priorities, etc. Response What should staff and visitors do in the event of specific disasters or emergencies the museum may experience? » Examples:Emergency Systems, Evacuation Routes, CPR/First Aid, Salvage Procedures, etc. Recovery What measures are in place for the museum to recover from the types of disasters and emergencies that it may experience? » Examples:Media Relations, Collections Triage, Facilities Assessments, Clean-up, etc.
  83. 83. Click to edit Master text styles Core Documents Online Resources

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